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Computer Science

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  • School of Engineering

Broad and rigorous training for students interested in the science of computing.

What You'll Study

The undergraduate major in computer science offers a broad and rigorous training for students interested in the science of computing. The track structure of the CS program also allows you to pursue the area(s) of CS you find most interesting while giving you a solid overall foundation in the field. As part of the CS major, students complete a set of core courses that provide a foundation in CS theory and systems. Students also choose a track (concentration area) to gain greater depth in a particular area of computing. The track can be chosen from among the following: Artificial Intelligence, Biocomputation, Computer Engineering, Graphics, Human-Computer Interaction, Information, Systems, Theory, or Unspecialized.

Degrees Offered

  • Joint Major/BAS

More Information

  • Computer Science Department
  • Learn more about Computer Science in the Stanford Bulletin
  • See IntroSems Related to this Major

Exploratory Courses

Introduction to Computers

Related Links

Computer Science Undergraduate Program

CS-BS - Computer Science (BS)

Program overview.

The undergraduate program in Computer Science aims to develop students’ breadth of knowledge across the subject areas of computer science, including their ability to apply the defining processes of computer science theory, abstraction, design, and implementation to solve problems in the discipline. Students take a set of core courses. After learning the essential programming techniques and the mathematical foundations of computer science, students take courses in programming techniques, automata and complexity theory, systems programming, computer architecture, analysis of algorithms, artificial intelligence, and applications. The program prepares students for careers in government, law, and the corporate sector and for graduate study.

Guide to Choosing Introductory Courses

Students arriving at Stanford have widely differing backgrounds and goals, but most find that using computers effectively benefits their education. The department offers many introductory courses to meet the needs of these students.

For students whose principal interest is exposure to the fundamental ideas behind computer science and programming,  course  or  course  are the most appropriate courses. They are intended for students in nontechnical disciplines who expect to make some use of computers but do not expect to go on to more advanced courses.  course  and  course  meet the Ways of Thinking Ways of Doing breadth requirements in Formal Reasoning and include an introduction to programming and the use of modern Internet-based technologies. Students interested in computer use should consider  course , Introduction to Computing at Stanford.

Students who intend to pursue a serious course of study in computer science may enter the program at various levels, depending on their background. Students with little prior experience or those who wish to take more time to study the fundamentals of programming should take  course , followed by  course . Students in  course  need not have prior programming experience. Students with significant previous exposure to programming or those who want an intensive introduction to the field may start directly in  course .  course  uses Python as its programming language;  course  uses C++. No prior knowledge of these languages is assumed, and the previous programming experience required for  course  may be in any language. In all cases, students are encouraged to discuss their background with the instructors responsible for these courses.

After the introductory sequence, Computer Science majors and those needing a significant computer science background for related engineering majors should take  course ,  course , and  course  or  course .  course  offers an introduction to the mathematical and theoretical foundations of computer science.  course  exposes students to various programming concepts that illustrate critical strategies used in systems development;  course  and  course  build on this material, focusing on the development of larger-scale software, using systems and networking abstractions.

In summary:

Overseas Studies Courses in Computer Science

See the listings in ExploreCourses or the Bing Overseas Studies website for course descriptions and additional offerings. Students should consult their department or program’s student services office for the applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

See the  Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB) for additional information and sample programs,

  • Considering CS?
  • Senior Project
  • Program Sheets
  • Transfer Credit
  • After Stanford

Welcome, Computer Science undergraduates and prospective students! The Computer Science department has a variety of opportunities for undergrads to engage with CS, whether it be majoring, minoring, teaching, doing research, or taking a few courses here and there.

So you're considering CS?

Looking for degree requirements.

Check out the Major Requirements page for major requirements, and the Declaring page if you're looking to declare. Check out the Minor Requirements page for minor requirements and the Coterm page if you're interested in coterming. For petitions and transfers, check out the Petitions page. See our Department Signatures page to get a form signed.

Graduating?

Congratulations! We want to make sure you have all of your coursework together so there are no last minute surprises. The quarter before you graduate, check for an email from the CS Department on the bscs email list for instructions on submitting your final program sheet, making sure your petitions and transfers are approved , getting any major/minor forms signed, and ensuring that proper classes are transferred between degrees if you are a coterm. See our Department Signatures page to get a form signed.

Looking for opportunities?

Take a look at how to do research in CS on our Research page, attending CS events on our Events page, and finding internships and full-time jobs on our Recruiting page.

Not sure who to talk to?

Check our our Who To See page.

Quick Links

  • Steps to Declare CS
  • Choosing/Changing Your Advisor

Petitions & Transfer Credit

  • Requirements
  • Undergraduate Engineering Handbook
  • EE-CS Courses

Opportunities

  • Section Leading
  • Coterminal Admissions
  • Coterm Information

Considering CS

  • High School FAQ
  • Faculty List
  • Stanford Wellness Network
  • Office of Accessible Education
  • CS Courses Schedule
  • Load Balancing

Upcoming Company Tours

Flowcharts and Plans

Main navigation, 2023-24 flowcharts and 4-year plans.

>>PHYSICS 41E (5-unit calculus-based physics course offered in winter quarter; designed for students without sufficient preparation for Physics 41) is acceptable in EVERY engineering major as satisfying the 41-level Mechanics requirement.

  • Aero/Astro 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Architecture Design (for students matriculated 2022-23 and earlier only; others see Sustainable Architecture & Engineering): 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Atmosphere/Energy 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Bioengineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Biomechanical Engineering Flowchart
  • Biomedical Computation 4-Year Plans & Flowchart & Chart of Requirements
  • Chemical Engineering: 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Civil Engineering: 4-Year Plans & Flowchart & Abroad 4-Year Plans
  • Computer Science: 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Design: 4-Year Plans  
  • Electrical Engineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Engineering Physics 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Environmental Systems Engineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart & Abroad 4-Year Plans
  • Individually Designed 4-Year Plan template
  • Management Science & Engineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Materials Science & Engineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Mechanical Engineering: 4-Year Plans & Flowchart
  • Sustainable Architecture & Engineering 4-Year Plans & Flowchart

2022-23 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro 4-Year Plan (only AP plan available) &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans  &   Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans   &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering:  Flowchart Biomedical Computation: 4-Year Plan & Flowchart & Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering Abroad : 4-Year Plans Computer Science:  4-Year Plans &  Flowchart

Design: 4-Year Plans Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  & Flowchart Engineering Physics: 4-Year Plans &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans   &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering  Abroad 4-Year Plans IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plan   Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart

2021-22 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans  &   Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans   &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering:  Flowchart Biomedical Computation: 4-Year Plans & Flowchart & Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering Abroad :  4-Year Plans Computer Science:  4-Year Plans &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  & Flowchart Engineering Physics: 4-Year Plans &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans   &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering  Abroad 4-Year Plans IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plan   Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans

2020-21 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

2020-21 documents are linked below.

Aero/Astro  4-Year & COVID Plans  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year & Flex Qtr Plans   &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering:  Flowchart Biomedical Computation: 4-Year Plans Excel & Flowchart & Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year & COVID Plans  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering Abroad:  4-Year Plans Excel Computer Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  COVID Plans  &  Flowchart Engineering Physics: 4-Year Plans &  1stYear Covid Plan  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year & FlexQtr Plans   &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering  Abroad 4-Year Plans IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plan Excel Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year & COVID Plans  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans  & Flowchart

2019-20 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

Many programs offer several 4-year and flowchart plan options. To see them all, click the links below and scroll.

Aero/Astro  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering:  Flowchart Biomedical Computation:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart  &  Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry:  4-Year Plans Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet  4-Year Plans Excel Computer Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Engineering Physics:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering Abroad  4-Year Plans Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plan Excel Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart

2018-19 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering:  Flowchart Biomedical Computation:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart  &  Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering  Abroad/Dry :  4-Year Plans  Excel Civil Engineering  Abroad/Wet   4-Year Plans  Excel Computer Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Engineering Physics:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering  Abroad  4-Year Plans Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plan Excel Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart

2017-18 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans

Many programs offer several 4-year and flowchart plan options. To see them all, link to the plan below and scroll.

Aero/Astro  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering: Check with BME advisor Biomedical Computation:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts  &  Chart

Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering  Abroad/Dry :  4-Year Plans Excel Civil Engineering  Abroad/Wet   4-Year Plans Excel Computer Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Engineering Physics:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering  Abroad   4-Year Plans Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plans Excel Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans Excel

2016-17 4-Year Plans and Flowcharts

Aero/Astro  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Architecture Design  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Atmosphere/Energy  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Bioengineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Biomechanical Engineering: Coming soon Biomedical Computation:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Chemical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowcharts Civil Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry:  4-Year Plans Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet  4-Year Plans Excel Computer Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Electrical Engineering:  4-Year plans Excel  &  Flowchart Engineering Physics:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Environmental Systems ENgineering Abroad  4-Year Plans Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  4-Year Plans Excel Management Science & Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Materials Science:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Mechanical Engineering:  4-Year Plans Excel  &  Flowchart Product Design:  4-Year Plans Excel

2015-16 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro  Excel Architecture Design  Excel Atmosphere/Energy  Excel Bioengineering:  Excel Biomechanical Engineering:  Excel Biomedical Computation:  Excel Chemical Engineering:  Excel Civil Engineering:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet  Excel Computer Science:  Excel Electrical Engineering:  Excel Engineering Physics:  Excel Environmental Systems Engineering:  Excel Environmental Systems Engineering Abroad  Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  Excel Management Science & Engineering:  Excel Materials Science:  Excel Mechanical Engineering:  Excel Product Design:  Excel

2014-15 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro  Excel Architecture Design  Excel Atmosphere/Energy  Excel Bioengineering:  Excel Biomechanical Engineering:  Excel Biomedical Computation:  Excel Chemical Engineering:  Excel Civil Engineering:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet  Excel Computer Science:  Excel Electrical Engineering:  Excel Engineering Physics:  Excel Environmental Systems Engineering:  Excel Environmental Systems Engineering Abroad  Excel IDMEN Blank Plan:  Excel Management Science & Engineering:  Excel Materials Science:  Excel Mechanical Engineering:  Excel Product Design:  Excel

2013-14 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro 2013-14:  Excel Architecture Design 2013-14:  Excel Atmosphere/Energy 2013-14:  Excel Bioengineering: 2013-14:  Excel Biomechanical Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Biomedical Computation: 2013-14  Excel Chemical Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Civil Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry 2013-14:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet 2013-14:  Excel Computer Science: 2013-14:  Excel Electrical Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Engineering Physics: 2013-14:  Excel Environmental Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Environmental Systems Engineering Abroad 2013-14:  Excel IDMEN Blank Plan: 2013-14:  Excel Management Science & Engineering: 2013-14  Excel Materials Science: 2013-14:  Excel Mechanical Engineering: 2013-14:  Excel Product Design: 2013-14:  Excel

2012-13 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro 2012-13:  Excel Architecture Design 2012-13:  Excel Atmosphere/Energy 2012-13:  Excel Bioengineering: 2012-13:  Excel Biomechanical Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Biomedical Computation: 2012-13  Excel Chemical Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Civil Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry 2012-13:  Excel Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet 2012-13:  Excel Computer Science: 2012-13:  Excel Electrical Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Engineering Physics: 2012-13:  Excel Environmental Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Environmental Abroad 2012-13:  Excel IDM Blank Plan: 2012-13:  Excel Management Science & Engineering: 2012-13  Excel Materials Science: 2012-13:  Excel Mechanical Engineering: 2012-13:  Excel Product Design: 2012-13:  Excel

2011-12 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro   2011-12:  Excel

Architecture Design   2011-12:  Excel

Atmosphere/Energy   2010-11:  Excel

Bioengineering:   2011-12:  Excel

Biomechanical Engineering:  2011-12:  Excel  Note that BIO 44X will no longer fulfill the BME WIM requirement after this year. See ME dept.for further details.

Biomedical Computation:   2011-12  Excel

Chemical Engineering:    2011-12:  Excel

Civil Engineering:    2011-12:  Excel

Civil Engineering Abroad/Dry    2011-12:  Excel

Civil Engineering Abroad/Wet  2011-12:  Excel

Computer Science:   2011-12:  Excel

Electrical Engineering:  2011-12:  Excel

Engineering Physics: 2011-12:  Excel

Environmental Engineering:  2011-12:  Excel

Environmental Abroad  2011-12:  Excel

IDM Blank Plan:  2011-12:  Excel

Management Science & Engineering: 2011-12  Excel

Materials Science: 2011-12:  Excel

Mechanical Engineering: 2011-12:  Excel

Product Design: 2011-12: none offered

2010-11 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro  2010-11:  Excel

Architecture Design  2010-11:  Excel

Atmosphere/Energy 2010-11:  Excel

Bioengineering: 2010-11:  Excel

Biomechanical Engineering: 2010-11:  Excel

Biomedical Computation: 2010-11:  Excel

Chemical Engineering: 2010-11:  Excel

Civil Engineering:2010-11:  Excel

Civil ENGR Abroad/Dry 2010-11:  Excel

Civil ENGR Abroad/Wet 2010-11:  Excel

Computer Science:  2010-11:  Excel

Electrical Engineering: 2010-11:  Excel

Engineering Physics: 2010-11:  Excel

Environmental Engineering: 2010-11:  Excel

Environmental Abroad 2010-11:  Excel

IDM Blank Plan: 2009-10: Excel  2010-11: Excel

Management Science & Engineering: 2010-11  Excel 

Materials Science: 2010-11:  Excel

Mechanical Engineering: 2010-11  Excel

Product Design: 2010-11:  Excel

2009-10 4-Year Plans

Aero/Astro 2009-10:  Excel Architecture Design 2009-10:  Excel Atmosphere/Energy 2009-10:  Excel Bioengineering: 2009-10:  Excel Biomechanical Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Biomedical Computation: 2009-10:  Excel  Chemical Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Civil Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel  Civil ENGR Abroad/Dry 2009-10:  Excel  Civil ENGR Abroad/Wet 2009-10:  Excel Computer Science: 2009-10:  Excel  Electrical Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Engineering Physics: 2009-10:  Excel Environmental Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Environmental Abroad 2009-10:  Excel  IDM Blank Plan: 2009-10: Excel  Management Science & Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Materials Science:2009-10:  Excel   Mechanical Engineering: 2009-10:  Excel Product Design: 2009-10:  Excel 

Computer Science

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Main navigation

The computer science department continues to lead the world in computer science research and education.

Throughout the past four decades, the department has influenced society at levels that remain without parallel among academic institutions. Its spin-offs are among the most successful corporate ventures in the world, and many of the leaders in the academic and corporate research world are our graduates.

Gates building

What are we researching?

Strong research groups exist in areas of artificial intelligence, robotics, foundations of computer science, scientific computing and systems. 

Top view of lecture hall full of students

What is it like for undergraduate students?

The CS curriculum provides knowledge that is applicable across many fields, including many areas of engineering, science, and medicine. Students receive a strong foundation in computer science as well as specialized knowledge through the student’s choice of track.

Students studying on floor in hallway

What is it like for graduate students?

With faculty and resources that are among the strongest in the world, students have the opportunity to participate in leading-edge academic research carried out at Stanford. The main educational goal is to prepare students for research and teaching careers either in universities or in industry

Information For

  • Prospective Graduate Students
  • Current Graduate Students
  • Prospective Undergraduate Students
  • Current Undergraduate Students

Human hand with robotic hand illustration.

Mehran Sahami on AI and safeguarding society

  • Technology & Society

B.S. Planning Guide

Every student’s academic plan is unique. Yours will probably look different from the samples and/or your friend’s plan, and that does not mean one of them is wrong. It is also normal for your plan to change as you go along, so please remember to be flexible. With that being said, we provide the sample plans as models to show how a student could complete the Data Science B.S.

Sample Plans: Data Science B.S. with Mathematics and Computation Subplan

Sample plan 1: starting year 1 with math 19.

  • Math 19, 20, 21
  • CS 106A & 106B
  • DataSci 112
  • Math 51, 52, 53
  • CS 103 and choice of CS class from Math & Comp Subplan (e.g. CS 107)
  • Math 104 or 113  
  • MS&E 211X or EE 364A
  • Stats 191 (or Stats 203 during year 4)
  • Choice of CS class from Math & Comp Subplan (e.g. CS 161)
  • WIM course (before capstone)
  • Data Science Elective 1 (Math & Comp Subplan)
  • Choice of Stats class from Math & Comp Subplan (e.g. Stats 202)
  • Data Science Electives 2 & 3 (Math & Comp Subplan)
  • MS&E 221

Sample Plan 2: Starting Year 1 with Math 51

  • Math 51 & 52
  • CS 103 and choice of CS class from Math & Comp subplan (e.g. CS 107)
  • Stats 200 (after Stats 191)

Sample Plan 3: Starting Year 2 with Math 51

  • Math 52 & 53
  • Math 104 or 113
  • Choice of CS class from Math & Comp subplan (e.g. CS 107)
  • Capstone (winter & spring)

Sample Plans: Data Science B.S. with Biology and Medicine Subplan

  • Bio or HumBio class from BioMed Subplan
  • Choice of CS class from BioMed Subplan (e.g. CS 161)
  • Remaining Bio or HumBio class(es) from BioMed Subplan
  • CS 103 
  • Remaining Bio or HumBio classes (2-3) from BioMed Subplan

Helpful Hints:

  • Note that the sample plans above reflect the requirements put into place for the 2023-2024 academic year. Students who are following the 2022-2023 requirements will essentially follow the mathematics and computation subplan but are not required to take DataSci 112. 
  • Plan to take about two or three classes for the major each quarter. 
  • Take Math 52 before Stats 116.
  • Math 53 can be taken prior to Math 52.
  • Take Stats 191 before Stats 200. Some students also find it helpful to take MS&E 221 before Stats 200. 
  • MS&E 221 has a prerequisite of MS&E 120. However, Stats 116 or Math 151 will provide sufficient preparation, so you do not need to take MS&E 120.
  • Take your WIM class before your capstone, and don’t wait until your senior year to take your WIM.
  • The capstone requirement starts with the graduating class of 2025. Complete your capstone no earlier than spring of your junior year.
  • Year 3 is the ideal time for a quarter abroad, if that's something you're interested in. No Data Science courses would be required during the quarter abroad. 

How technology is reinventing education

Stanford Graduate School of Education Dean Dan Schwartz and other education scholars weigh in on what's next for some of the technology trends taking center stage in the classroom.

computer science study plan stanford

Image credit: Claire Scully

New advances in technology are upending education, from the recent debut of new artificial intelligence (AI) chatbots like ChatGPT to the growing accessibility of virtual-reality tools that expand the boundaries of the classroom. For educators, at the heart of it all is the hope that every learner gets an equal chance to develop the skills they need to succeed. But that promise is not without its pitfalls.

“Technology is a game-changer for education – it offers the prospect of universal access to high-quality learning experiences, and it creates fundamentally new ways of teaching,” said Dan Schwartz, dean of Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE), who is also a professor of educational technology at the GSE and faculty director of the Stanford Accelerator for Learning . “But there are a lot of ways we teach that aren’t great, and a big fear with AI in particular is that we just get more efficient at teaching badly. This is a moment to pay attention, to do things differently.”

For K-12 schools, this year also marks the end of the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funding program, which has provided pandemic recovery funds that many districts used to invest in educational software and systems. With these funds running out in September 2024, schools are trying to determine their best use of technology as they face the prospect of diminishing resources.

Here, Schwartz and other Stanford education scholars weigh in on some of the technology trends taking center stage in the classroom this year.

AI in the classroom

In 2023, the big story in technology and education was generative AI, following the introduction of ChatGPT and other chatbots that produce text seemingly written by a human in response to a question or prompt. Educators immediately worried that students would use the chatbot to cheat by trying to pass its writing off as their own. As schools move to adopt policies around students’ use of the tool, many are also beginning to explore potential opportunities – for example, to generate reading assignments or coach students during the writing process.

AI can also help automate tasks like grading and lesson planning, freeing teachers to do the human work that drew them into the profession in the first place, said Victor Lee, an associate professor at the GSE and faculty lead for the AI + Education initiative at the Stanford Accelerator for Learning. “I’m heartened to see some movement toward creating AI tools that make teachers’ lives better – not to replace them, but to give them the time to do the work that only teachers are able to do,” he said. “I hope to see more on that front.”

He also emphasized the need to teach students now to begin questioning and critiquing the development and use of AI. “AI is not going away,” said Lee, who is also director of CRAFT (Classroom-Ready Resources about AI for Teaching), which provides free resources to help teach AI literacy to high school students across subject areas. “We need to teach students how to understand and think critically about this technology.”

Immersive environments

The use of immersive technologies like augmented reality, virtual reality, and mixed reality is also expected to surge in the classroom, especially as new high-profile devices integrating these realities hit the marketplace in 2024.

The educational possibilities now go beyond putting on a headset and experiencing life in a distant location. With new technologies, students can create their own local interactive 360-degree scenarios, using just a cell phone or inexpensive camera and simple online tools.

“This is an area that’s really going to explode over the next couple of years,” said Kristen Pilner Blair, director of research for the Digital Learning initiative at the Stanford Accelerator for Learning, which runs a program exploring the use of virtual field trips to promote learning. “Students can learn about the effects of climate change, say, by virtually experiencing the impact on a particular environment. But they can also become creators, documenting and sharing immersive media that shows the effects where they live.”

Integrating AI into virtual simulations could also soon take the experience to another level, Schwartz said. “If your VR experience brings me to a redwood tree, you could have a window pop up that allows me to ask questions about the tree, and AI can deliver the answers.”

Gamification

Another trend expected to intensify this year is the gamification of learning activities, often featuring dynamic videos with interactive elements to engage and hold students’ attention.

“Gamification is a good motivator, because one key aspect is reward, which is very powerful,” said Schwartz. The downside? Rewards are specific to the activity at hand, which may not extend to learning more generally. “If I get rewarded for doing math in a space-age video game, it doesn’t mean I’m going to be motivated to do math anywhere else.”

Gamification sometimes tries to make “chocolate-covered broccoli,” Schwartz said, by adding art and rewards to make speeded response tasks involving single-answer, factual questions more fun. He hopes to see more creative play patterns that give students points for rethinking an approach or adapting their strategy, rather than only rewarding them for quickly producing a correct response.

Data-gathering and analysis

The growing use of technology in schools is producing massive amounts of data on students’ activities in the classroom and online. “We’re now able to capture moment-to-moment data, every keystroke a kid makes,” said Schwartz – data that can reveal areas of struggle and different learning opportunities, from solving a math problem to approaching a writing assignment.

But outside of research settings, he said, that type of granular data – now owned by tech companies – is more likely used to refine the design of the software than to provide teachers with actionable information.

The promise of personalized learning is being able to generate content aligned with students’ interests and skill levels, and making lessons more accessible for multilingual learners and students with disabilities. Realizing that promise requires that educators can make sense of the data that’s being collected, said Schwartz – and while advances in AI are making it easier to identify patterns and findings, the data also needs to be in a system and form educators can access and analyze for decision-making. Developing a usable infrastructure for that data, Schwartz said, is an important next step.

With the accumulation of student data comes privacy concerns: How is the data being collected? Are there regulations or guidelines around its use in decision-making? What steps are being taken to prevent unauthorized access? In 2023 K-12 schools experienced a rise in cyberattacks, underscoring the need to implement strong systems to safeguard student data.

Technology is “requiring people to check their assumptions about education,” said Schwartz, noting that AI in particular is very efficient at replicating biases and automating the way things have been done in the past, including poor models of instruction. “But it’s also opening up new possibilities for students producing material, and for being able to identify children who are not average so we can customize toward them. It’s an opportunity to think of entirely new ways of teaching – this is the path I hope to see.”

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Artist’s concept of a collision between two objects in the distant Kuiper Belt

NASA’s New Horizons Detects Dusty Hints of Extended Kuiper Belt

All the major structures that will form the core stage for NASA’s SLS (Space Launch System) rocket for the agency’s Artemis III mission are structurally complete. Technicians finished welding the 51-foot liquid oxygen tank structure, left, inside the Vertical Assembly Building at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Jan. 8. The liquid hydrogen tank, right, completed internal cleaning Nov. 14.

Rocket Propellant Tanks for NASA’s Artemis III Mission Take Shape

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computer science study plan stanford

Experience the Launch of NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test Mission  

computer science study plan stanford

NASA Astronomer Sees Power in Community, Works to Build More

computer science study plan stanford

Annual Highlights of Results 2023: Introduction and Analyses

computer science study plan stanford

Teams Add Iconic NASA ‘Worm’ Logo to Artemis II Rocket, Spacecraft

Arctic Ocean

Meet NASA’s Twin Spacecraft Headed to the Ends of the Earth

What’s made in a thunderstorm and faster than lightning gamma rays.

OpenET Study Helps Water Managers and Farmers Put NASA Data to Work

OpenET Study Helps Water Managers and Farmers Put NASA Data to Work

Ride the Wave of Radio Astronomy During the Solar Eclipse  

Ride the Wave of Radio Astronomy During the Solar Eclipse  

Eclipse 2024 Science

Eclipse 2024 Science

Discovery Alert: Glowing Cloud Points to a Cosmic Collision

Discovery Alert: Glowing Cloud Points to a Cosmic Collision

Hubble Views a Massive Star Forming

Hubble Views a Massive Star Forming

New point of contact for C.16 Laboratory Analysis of Returned Samples

New point of contact for C.16 Laboratory Analysis of Returned Samples

New point of contact for C.17 Planetary Science Enabling Facilities

New point of contact for C.17 Planetary Science Enabling Facilities

The planning start date for F.9 Citizen Science Seed Funding Program has changed.

The planning start date for F.9 Citizen Science Seed Funding Program has changed.

Five college students in a library look at a tablet as simulated screen shots float in the air.

NASA Selects University Teams to Explore Innovative Aeronautical Research

The DC-8 aircraft takes off from Palmdale, California, ascending against a cloudy gray sky

NASA Collaborates in an International Air Quality Study

This image is an illustration of NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter flying on Mars.

Special Report: Aeronautics Honors Ingenuity

Radioisotope Power Systems Resources

Radioisotope Power Systems Resources

Girl in a wheelchair with a laptop display on a mount

Seeing is Communicating

Photo of a Laser Retroreflector Array (LRA).

How NASA Uses Simple Technology to Track Lunar Missions

computer science study plan stanford

Career Journey: Building Strength as an Astronaut Fitness Trainer

The 2024 National Science Bowl regional competition hosted by JPL included 21 schools, with this team from Irvine’s University High School taking first place. From left, coach David Knight, Feodor Yevtushenko, Yufei Chen, Nathan Ouyang, Wendy Cao, and Julianne Wu.

University High School Wins Regional Science Bowl at NASA’s JPL

An external image of the Alabama A&M University Agribition Center from the front facade. The Center is a cream-colored stone building with a curved roof, floor-to-ceiling windows, and concrete steps that lead to a covered awning, framed by deep-red structural beams above. Shrubs and crepe myrtle trees frame the foreground and steps leading up to the building. Photo courtesy of AAMU Extension

NASA Taps Alabama A&M University to Host Break the Ice Lunar Challenge

computer science study plan stanford

Renee King: Ensuring Space for Everyone

Fisheye lens view of Schweickart, left, and McDivitt in the Lunar Module simulator

55 Years Ago: Five Months Until the Moon Landing

NASA astronaut Frank Rubio uses a tool in his right hand as he activates a space biology experiment that is studying how weightlessness affects genetic expression in microbes.

Ciencia destacada del año en el espacio del astronauta Frank Rubio

Frank Rubio, un hombre de pelo y ojos oscuros y con lentes, sonríe y tiene los brazos cruzados. Va vestido con un polo oscuro y pantalones khaki. Detrás suyo se ve la atmósfera de la Tierra a través de las ventanas de observación de la cúpula.

Misión récord de astronauta ayuda a planificar viajes al espacio profundo

monnikin

Pruebas de la NASA con maniquí de Artemis I aportan información para futuras misiones tripuladas

Martians wanted: nasa opens call for simulated yearlong mars mission.

The headshot image of Roxana Bardan

Roxana Bardan

Nasa headquarters, johnson space center.

computer science study plan stanford

NASA is seeking applicants to participate in its next simulated one-year Mars surface mission to help inform the agency’s plans for human exploration of the Red Planet. The second of three planned ground-based missions called CHAPEA (Crew Health and Performance Exploration Analog) is scheduled to kick off in spring 2025.

Each CHAPEA mission involves a four-person volunteer crew living and working inside a 1,700-square-foot, 3D-printed habitat based at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The habitat, called the Mars Dune Alpha, simulates the challenges of a mission on Mars, including resource limitations, equipment failures, communication delays, and other environmental stressors. Crew tasks include simulated spacewalks, robotic operations, habitat maintenance, exercise, and crop growth.

NASA is looking for healthy, motivated U.S. citizens or permanent residents who are non-smokers, 30-55 years old, and proficient in English for effective communication between crewmates and mission control. Applicants should have a strong desire for unique, rewarding adventures and interest in contributing to NASA’s work to prepare for the first human journey to Mars.

The deadline for applicants is Tuesday, April 2.

https://chapea.nasa.gov/

Crew selection will follow additional standard NASA criteria for astronaut candidate applicants. A master’s degree in a STEM field such as engineering, mathematics, or biological, physical or computer science from an accredited institution with at least two years of professional STEM experience or a minimum of one thousand hours piloting an aircraft is required. Candidates who have completed two years of work toward a doctoral program in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, completed a medical degree, or a test pilot program will also be considered. With four years of professional experience, applicants who have completed military officer training or a bachelor of science degree in a STEM field may be considered.

Compensation for participating in the mission is available. More information will be provided during the candidate screening process.

As NASA works to establish a long-term presence for scientific discovery and exploration on the Moon through the Artemis campaign, CHAPEA missions provide important scientific data to validate systems and develop solutions for future missions to the Red Planet. With the first CHAPEA crew more than halfway through their yearlong mission, NASA is using research gained through the simulated missions to help inform crew health and performance support during Mars expeditions.

Under NASA’s  Artemis  campaign, the agency will establish the foundation for long-term scientific exploration at the Moon, land the first woman, first person of color, and its first international partner astronaut on the lunar surface, and prepare for human expeditions to Mars for the benefit of all.

For more about CHAPEA, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/humans-in-space/chapea/

Rachel Kraft Headquarters, Washington 202-358-1100 [email protected]

Anna Schneider/Laura Sorto Johnson Space Center, Houston 281-483-5111 [email protected] /[email protected]

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Stanford University

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Application Requirements

This is the old stanford computer science website for archival purposes, information found on this page maybe outdated and inaccurate. please visit the new stanford computer science web site for up-to-date information.

Please note: all application deadlines are final. Applications will not be accepted after the deadline.

This information is designed to facilitate your application processing and to maximize your chance for admission to our graduate programs in the Computer Science Department. Please read this material carefully BEFORE you fill out your application.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN, you must review the University's Graduate Admissions website before applying on-line. Then, carefully follow their directions as the first step for completing an application to the Computer Science Department. Detailed graduate information, financing Graduate Study and University requirements for application to Graduate Study at Stanford are available at this website.

Keep your e-mail address current by notifying CS Graduate Admissions at [email protected] . All correspondence regarding your application and notification of all admissions decisions are done via your e-mail.

Make sure your first and last names remain consistent throughout the application process, on your TOEFL and in your correspondence with the department.

Because of the large volume of applications received, submit your application early to avoid any delays in processing.

Admission to the Computer Science Department is very competitive. Each year approximately 4,000 applications are received for our graduate programs. It is recommended that all parts of the application be strong as many outstanding applications are received. In order to ensure a complete and competitive application, careful preparation and attention is required. Please plan well in advance of the application deadline and submit your application early.

Take your TOEFL tests early. You must ensure that the scores arrive at Stanford by our deadline. 

We do not keep records of application documents/materials from previous years.  You are required to re-submit all the documents/materials.

Gates Computer Science Building 353 Jane Stanford Way Stanford, CA 94305

Phone: (650) 723-2300

Admissions : [email protected]

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Cs info session | applying to graduate, event details:, this event is open to:.

Come join the Department of Computer Science (CS) team for a virtual information session that will allow Bachelors, Masters, and Coterm students to gain insight on the commencement checklist steps to complete and ask questions!

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  1. Computer Science 1 : Lecture 3

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COMMENTS

  1. Academics

    Overview Welcome, Computer Science undergraduates and prospective students! The Computer Science Department has consistently maintained the reputation of being one of the top Computer Science programs in the world. Prospective CS students do not need any prior background to study this subject!

  2. Computer Science Program

    The minimum major in computer science consists of 96 units, including 26 units of math, 11 units of science, 10 units of engineering fundamentals, one course in TIS (Technology in Society), one Writing in Major (WIM) course, and 43 units of core depth.

  3. BS

    The minimum major in computer science consists of 96 units, including 26 units of math, 11 units of science, 10 units of engineering fundamentals, one course in TIS (Technology in Society), and 43 units of core depth.

  4. Computer Science

    The undergraduate major in computer science offers a broad and rigorous training for students interested in the science of computing. The track structure of the CS program also allows you to pursue the area (s) of CS you find most interesting while giving you a solid overall foundation in the field. As part of the CS major, students complete a ...

  5. CS-BS Program

    The undergraduate program in Computer Science aims to develop students' breadth of knowledge across the subject areas of computer science, including their ability to apply the defining processes of computer science theory, abstraction, design, and implementation to solve problems in the discipline. Students take a set of core courses.

  6. Stanford University Undergraduate Major in Computer Science

    Stanford's Computer Science Department was founded in 1965 and has consistently enjoyed the reputation of being one of the top computer science programs in the world.You do not need any prior background to study CS! Many students start taking the introductory CS106 courses with no prior experience coding.

  7. The Major

    The Major. PhD Admissions. Master's Admissions. Coterminal Admissions. Joint Degree Admissions. Graduate Application Checklists. Graduate Application Deadlines. Current Stanford Students. Non-Degree Option.

  8. Stanford Computer Science

    Stanford CS is nurturing a future in science that represents all cultures and backgrounds. Our Research is in the News We're in the News TIME100 AI recognizes Prof. Fei-Fei Li Congratulations to Fei-Fei Li, Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University!

  9. MS

    Overview The central requirement for the MS CS degree is completion of at least 45 units that represent an approved academic plan. The concrete representation of that academic plan is your program sheet, which lists the courses you intend to use to satisfy the 45-unit requirement.

  10. Stanford University Undergraduate Major in Computer Science

    The core material of the computer science program has been streamlined into six classes that every CS student takes. Students then pick an area that they would like to study in more depth, which becomes their track specialization. The track typically consists of 4-5 classes. Finally, students round out their CS curriculum with 2-4 elective courses.

  11. BS

    Computer Engineering 2023-2024: Comp Eng pdf 2022-2023: Comp Eng pdf 2021-2022: Comp Eng pdf 2020-2021: Comp Eng pdf Information 2023-2024: Info pdf 2022-2023: Info pdf 2021-2022: Info pdf 2020-2021: Info pdf Theory 2023-2024: Theory pdf 2022-2023: Theory pdf 2021-2022: Theory pdf 2020-2021: Theory pdf Visual Computing (Graphics)

  12. Computer Science MS Degree

    The M.S. degree in Computer Science is intended as a terminal professional degree and does not lead to the Ph.D. degree. Most students planning to obtain the Ph.D. degree should apply directly for admission to the Ph.D. program. Some students, however, may wish to complete the master's program before deciding whether to pursue the Ph.D. To give such students a greater opportunity to become ...

  13. Undergraduate Degree Programs

    Integrates biology and clinical medicine with engineering mechanics and design. Undergraduate degrees offered: Bachelor of Science, Honors. Biomedical Computation (BMC) (link is external) Combines biology, medicine and computer science in a cutting-edge interdisciplinary degree. Undergraduate degrees offered: Bachelor of Science, Honors.

  14. Flowcharts and Plans

    2023-24 Flowcharts and 4-Year Plans. >>PHYSICS 41E (5-unit calculus-based physics course offered in winter quarter; designed for students without sufficient preparation for Physics 41) is acceptable in EVERY engineering major as satisfying the 41-level Mechanics requirement. Aero/Astro 4-Year Plans.

  15. Foundations in Computer Science Graduate Certificate

    What You'll Earn. You'll earn a Stanford Graduate Certificate in Foundations in Computer Science when you successfully earn a grade of B (3.0) or better in each course in the program.. With each successful completion of a course in this program, you'll receive a Stanford University transcript and academic credit, which may be applied to a relevant graduate degree program that accepts these ...

  16. Computer Science

    What are we researching? Strong research groups exist in areas of artificial intelligence, robotics, foundations of computer science, scientific computing and systems. What is it like for undergraduate students? The CS curriculum provides knowledge that is applicable across many fields, including many areas of engineering, science, and medicine.

  17. PhD

    A student should plan and successfully complete a coherent program of study covering the basic areas of Computer Science and related disciplines. The student's advisor has primary responsibility for the adequacy of the program. The University has two main requirements related to courses.

  18. B.S. Planning Guide

    Plan to take about two or three classes for the major each quarter. Take Math 52 before Stats 116. Math 53 can be taken prior to Math 52. Take Stats 191 before Stats 200. Some students also find it helpful to take MS&E 221 before Stats 200. MS&E 221 has a prerequisite of MS&E 120. However, Stats 116 or Math 151 will provide sufficient ...

  19. Academic Requirements

    This is the old Stanford Computer Science website for archival purposes, information found on this page maybe outdated and inaccurate. ... A student should plan and successfully complete a coherent program of study covering the basic areas of Computer Science and related disciplines. The student's advisor has primary responsibility for the ...

  20. Application Requirements

    Stanford resources; Getting to know Stanford; New Graduate Student Checklist; Incoming MS Students; Incoming PhD Students; Stanford Wellness Network; Graduate Student Preview Day; M.S. to Ph.D. Pathways Program; LINXS Summer Research Program; CS Diploma Ceremony; BS/MS Advising; Admissions . PhD. General Information; Application Requirements ...

  21. Statistics for AI, Machine Learning, and Data Science

    There have been tremendous advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning in recent years across a variety of fields ranging from autonomous driving to disease prediction and natural language processing. All of these advancements, however, are deeply rooted in the fields of statistics and computer science.

  22. How technology is reinventing K-12 education

    Six Stanford faculty among 2024 Sloan Research Fellows. The fellowship "recognizes and rewards outstanding early-career faculty who have the potential to revolutionize their fields of study."

  23. The Major

    CS Major Overview The CS curriculum provides knowledge that is applicable across many fields, including many areas of engineering, science, and medicine. The core material of the computer science program has been streamlined into six classes that every CS student takes.

  24. Strategic Plan

    With this strategic plan, the Stanford CS Department lays out its direction for the next two decades of research and education. The plan is the result of a unified vision, by which CS is becoming pervasive in all of society. This important development creates new challenges and opportunities for CS research and education. File Attachments (Public):

  25. Martians Wanted: NASA Opens Call for Simulated Yearlong Mars Mission

    A master's degree in a STEM field such as engineering, mathematics, or biological, physical or computer science from an accredited institution with at least two years of professional STEM experience or a minimum of one thousand hours piloting an aircraft is required.

  26. Application Requirements

    This information is designed to facilitate your application processing and to maximize your chance for admission to our graduate programs in the Computer Science Department. Please read this material carefully BEFORE you fill out your application.

  27. CS Info Session

    Come join the Department of Computer Science (CS) team for a virtual information session that will allow Bachelors, Masters, and Coterm students to gain insight on the commencement checklist steps to complete and ask questions!