• Account Settings
  • The Disney Bundle
  • Parks & Travel
  • Walt Disney World
  • Disney Cruise Line
  • All Parks & Travel
  • Movies Anywhere
  • Disney Movie Insiders
  • 20th Century Studios
  • Accessories
  • Disney News
  • Disney on Broadway
  • Disney on Ice
  • Disney Live!
  • Walt Disney World Resort
  • Disneyland Resort
  • Aulani - A Disney Resort and Spa
  • Adventures by Disney
  • Disney Vacation Club
  • D23: The Official Disney Fan Club

Disney

EARN POINTS AND UNLOCK REWARDS FOR MOVIE PURCHASES WITH DISNEY MOVIE INSIDERS

Luca - Featured Content Banner

June 18, 2021

Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar’s original feature film “Luca” is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, Alberto (voice of Jack Dylan Grazer), but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water’s surface. “Luca” is directed by Academy Award® nominee Enrico Casarosa (“La Luna”) and produced by Andrea Warren (“Lava,” “Cars 3”).

Rated: PG Runtime: 1h 35min Release Date: June 18, 2021

Directed By

Produced by.

rated PG

  • motionpictures.org
  • filmratings.com

Soul, Luca, and Turning Red Back in Theaters

Soul, Luca, and Turning Red Back in Theaters

Disney and Pixar’s LUCA | Friendship | Own On Blu-ray & New On Digital

Disney and Pixar’s LUCA | Friendship | Own On Blu-ray & New On Digital

Luca-Inspired Gelato Art | Pixar

Luca-Inspired Gelato Art | Pixar

How to Draw Guilia from Luca | Draw With Pixar | Pixar

How to Draw Guilia from Luca | Draw With Pixar | Pixar

Learn Italian with Luca! | Pixar

Learn Italian with Luca! | Pixar

Out of Towners | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Out of Towners | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Three Plates of Pasta We Want to Eat (and Two We Don't) | Disney+

Three Plates of Pasta We Want to Eat (and Two We Don't) | Disney+

Ciao, Chow | Learning About Gelato with the Cast of Luca | Pixar

Ciao, Chow | Learning About Gelato with the Cast of Luca | Pixar

Greetings from Portorosso | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Greetings from Portorosso | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

No Goofing Around | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

No Goofing Around | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

The Ultimate Luca Challenge | Disney

The Ultimate Luca Challenge | Disney

Now Streaming | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Now Streaming | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Italy in 30 Seconds | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+”

Italy in 30 Seconds | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+”

Sea Monsters | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Sea Monsters | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Believe | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Believe | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Evolution of a World | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Evolution of a World | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Beyond the Surface | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Beyond the Surface | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Friendship Featurette | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Friendship Featurette | Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Disney+

Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Official Trailer | Disney+

Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Official Trailer | Disney+

Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Teaser Trailer

Disney and Pixar’s Luca | Teaser Trailer

Related articles, news pixar jun 24, the animation and effects behind pixar’s luca , now streaming.

June 24, 2021

News Pixar May 25

Enter the world of portorosso with a deep dive on the art and character designs in luca .

May 25, 2021

News Pixar Apr 28

Exploring friendship, acceptance, and overcoming fear in pixar's luca.

April 28, 2021

Discover Luca Products at DisneyStore.com

Luca Sketchbook Ear Hat Ornament

Luca Sketchbook Ear Hat Ornament

Luca Cooler Tote

Luca Cooler Tote

Luca Acacia Pizza Peel Serving Paddle

Luca Acacia Pizza Peel Serving Paddle

Luca Charm Necklace

Luca Charm Necklace

Luca Bike Bracelet Set

Luca Bike Bracelet Set

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish OtterBox iPhone Case – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish OtterBox iPhone Case – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' OtterBox iPhone Case – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' OtterBox iPhone Case – Customized

Luca: Portorosso Vintage Illustration T-Shirt for Women – Customized

Luca: Portorosso Vintage Illustration T-Shirt for Women – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Stainless Steel Water Bottle – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Stainless Steel Water Bottle – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Canvas Print – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Canvas Print – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' Throw Pillow – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' Throw Pillow – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' Luggage Tag – Customized

Luca: ''Hang On!'' Luggage Tag – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' T-Shirt for Adults – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' T-Shirt for Adults – Customized

Luca: ''To the Victory'' Throw Pillow – Customized

Luca: ''To the Victory'' Throw Pillow – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Mug – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Mug – Customized

Luca: ''To the Victory'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: ''To the Victory'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: ''Big Cat in Town'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: ''Big Cat in Town'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare T-Shirt for Men – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare T-Shirt for Men – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Tote Bag – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Tote Bag – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' T-Shirt for Kids – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Luggage Tag – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Luggage Tag – Customized

Luca: Portorosso Vintage Illustration Mouse Pad – Customized

Luca: Portorosso Vintage Illustration Mouse Pad – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Mouse Pad – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swim by Isola Del Mare Mouse Pad – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish Three Ring Binder – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish Three Ring Binder – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Trifold Wallet – Customized

Luca ''Wild&Free'' Trifold Wallet – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' Three Ring Binder – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' Three Ring Binder – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' Stainless Steel Water Bottle – Customized

Luca ''Here We Go'' Stainless Steel Water Bottle – Customized

Luca: ''Big Cat in Town'' Mug – Customized

Luca: ''Big Cat in Town'' Mug – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish Mug – Customized

Luca: Alberto&Luca Swimming with Fish Mug – Customized

Luca: Silenzio, Bruno!: When in Doubt, Shout It Out! Book

Luca: Silenzio, Bruno!: When in Doubt, Shout It Out! Book

Recommended movies.

Concept art poster image of Elio standing in front of creatures from the Disney•Pixar movie, "Elio".

Inside Out 2

Disney • Pixar | Elemental | Rated PG | Now streaming | Disney+ | movie poster

Turning Red

Disney•Pixar | Lightyear

Toy Story 4

Incredibles 2 poster

Incredibles 2

Pixar Short Films Collection, Vol. 3 poster

Pixar Short Films Collection, Vol. 3

Coco movie poster

Finding Dory

Inside Out Poster

The Good Dinosaur

Disney•Pixar | Party Central movie poster

Party Central

Monsters University movie poster

Monsters University

Brave poster

Pixar Short Films Collection, Vol. 2

Cars 2 Movie poster

Log in or sign up for Rotten Tomatoes

Trouble logging in?

By continuing, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes.

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes.

Email not verified

Let's keep in touch.

Rotten Tomatoes Newsletter

Sign up for the Rotten Tomatoes newsletter to get weekly updates on:

  • Upcoming Movies and TV shows
  • Trivia & Rotten Tomatoes Podcast
  • Media News + More

By clicking "Sign Me Up," you are agreeing to receive occasional emails and communications from Fandango Media (Fandango, Vudu, and Rotten Tomatoes) and consenting to Fandango's Privacy Policy and Terms and Policies . Please allow 10 business days for your account to reflect your preferences.

OK, got it!

Movies / TV

No results found.

  • What's the Tomatometer®?
  • Login/signup

luca movie information

Movies in theaters

  • Opening this week
  • Top box office
  • Coming soon to theaters
  • Certified fresh movies

Movies at home

  • Netflix streaming
  • Amazon prime
  • Most popular streaming movies
  • What to Watch New

Certified fresh picks

  • Dune: Part Two Link to Dune: Part Two
  • Fitting In Link to Fitting In
  • Orion and the Dark Link to Orion and the Dark

New TV Tonight

  • Avatar: The Last Airbender: Season 1
  • Constellation: Season 1
  • Star Wars: The Bad Batch: Season 3
  • The Second Best Hospital in The Galaxy: Season 1
  • Last Week Tonight With John Oliver: Season 11
  • James Brown: Say It Loud: Season 1
  • Can I Tell You A Secret?: Season 1

Most Popular TV on RT

  • Shōgun: Season 1
  • True Detective: Season 4
  • One Day: Season 1
  • House of Ninjas: Season 1
  • A Killer Paradox: Season 1
  • Resident Alien: Season 3
  • The Tourist: Season 2
  • Halo: Season 2
  • Best TV Shows
  • Most Popular TV
  • TV & Streaming News
  • Prime Video

Certified fresh pick

  • Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 12 Link to Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 12
  • All-Time Lists
  • Binge Guide
  • Comics on TV
  • Five Favorite Films
  • Video Interviews
  • Weekend Box Office
  • Weekly Ketchup
  • What to Watch

Best Movies of 2024: Best New Movies to Watch Now

Berlin Film Festival 2024: Movie Scorecard

Black Heritage

Golden Tomato Awards: Best Movies & TV of 2023

10 Iconic Shows That Made the ’90s A Revolutionary Decade for Black Television

Air , Barbie , and Oppenheimer earn WGA screenplay nominations

  • Trending on RT
  • Play Movie Trivia
  • Dune: Part Two
  • Borderlands

2021, Kids & family/Comedy, 1h 40m

What to know

Critics Consensus

Slight but suffused with infectious joy, the beguiling Luca proves Pixar can play it safe while still charming audiences of all ages. Read critic reviews

Audience Says

It isn't as creative as Pixar's best movies, but Luca lives up to the studio's standards for beautiful animation while telling a sweet fish-out-of-water story the whole family will enjoy. Read audience reviews

You might also like

Where to watch luca.

Watch Luca with a subscription on Disney+, or buy it on Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV.

Rate And Review

Super Reviewer

Rate this movie

Oof, that was Rotten.

Meh, it passed the time.

It’s good – I’d recommend it.

So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

What did you think of the movie? (optional)

You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

Step 2 of 2

How did you buy your ticket?

Let's get your review verified..

AMCTheatres.com or AMC App New

Cinemark Coming Soon

We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

Regal Coming Soon

Theater box office or somewhere else

By opting to have your ticket verified for this movie, you are allowing us to check the email address associated with your Rotten Tomatoes account against an email address associated with a Fandango ticket purchase for the same movie.

You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

Luca videos, luca   photos.

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, Alberto (voice of Jack Dylan Grazer), but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water's surface.

Rating: PG (Language|Brief Violence|Rude Humor|Some Thematic Elements)

Genre: Kids & family, Comedy, Fantasy, Animation

Original Language: English

Director: Enrico Casarosa

Producer: Andrea Warren

Writer: Jesse Andrews , Mike Jones

Release Date (Theaters): Mar 22, 2024  wide

Release Date (Streaming): Jun 18, 2021

Runtime: 1h 40m

Distributor: Disney/Pixar

Production Co: Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Pictures

Sound Mix: Dolby Atmos, Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio: Flat (1.85:1)

View the collection: Pixar

Cast & Crew

Jacob Tremblay

Luca Paguro Voice

Jack Dylan Grazer

Alberto Scorfano Voice

Emma Berman

Giulia Voice

Maya Rudolph

Daniela Voice

Giacomo Gianniotti

Giacomo Voice

Jim Gaffigan

Lorenzo Voice

Sandy Martin

Grandma Voice

Francesca Fanti

Maggiore Voice

Gino D'Acampo

Eugenio Voice

Marco Barricelli

Massimo Voice

Saverio Raimondo

Ercole Visconti Voice

Enrico Casarosa

Jesse Andrews

Screenwriter

Andrea Warren

Pete Docter

Executive Producer

David Juan Bianchi

Cinematographer

Catherine Apple

Film Editing

Jason Hudak

Original Music

Daniela Strijleva

Production Design

News & Interviews for Luca

All Upcoming Disney Movies: New Disney Live-Action, Animation, Pixar, Marvel, 20th Century, And Searchlight

Where to Watch the 2022 Oscar Nominees

Oscar Nominations 2022: Full List of Nominated Films, Actors, Directors, and Filmmakers

Critic Reviews for Luca

Audience reviews for luca.

There are no featured reviews for Luca because the movie has not released yet (Mar 22, 2024).

Movie & TV guides

Play Daily Tomato Movie Trivia

Awards Tour

Discover What to Watch

Rotten Tomatoes Podcasts

  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

Luca

  • On the Italian Riviera, an unlikely but strong friendship grows between a human being and a sea monster disguised as a human.
  • A young boy experiences an unforgettable seaside summer on the Italian Riviera filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: he is a sea monster from another world just below the ocean's surface.
  • Young Luca and his best friend, Alberto, summon up the courage to visit the picturesque fishing village of Portorosso. However, the boys share and hide a great secret: they are not ordinary children but harmless sea monsters who live underwater, eager to find out what lies above the sea's surface. Before long, adventure after adventure and experience after experience, the two wide-eyed explorers will discover the true meaning of freedom, the importance of family, and the catalytic power of acceptance. — Nick Riganas
  • Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, the original animated feature is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: he is a sea monster from another world just below the water's surface. — Pixar
  • Luca Paguro is a pre-teen sea monster living off the coast of the Italian city of Portorosso who spends his days herding a school of fish. His parents, Daniela and Lorenzo, restrict him from going to the surface out of fear, but doing the same thing day after day ends up making Luca bored. One day, while feeling conflicted about whether or not to go to the surface, Luca meets another young sea monster named Alberto Scorfano. Alberto has been on land many times and has a hideout on an island near Portorosso where he claims he lives with his father. He begs Luca to follow him there. Reluctantly, Luca follows, and they transform into humans on the dry land and make their way to Alberto's hideout. Luca finds a poster in the hideout showing a Vespa, an Italian scooter, and they soon decide to make their own from scratch. All the while, Luca tries to keep his now double-life a secret from his parents with only his grandmother being clued in and keeping it a secret. Lorenzo and Daniela soon discover what Luca has been doing and decide that to keep Luca safe, he should be sent deeper into the ocean to live with Lorenzo's brother Ugo. Distraught, Luca runs away to the city of Portorosso with Alberto. There, they learn of the local bully and repeat champion of the Portorosso Cup Race, Ercole Visconti. Just as Ercole is about to dunk Luca's head into a fountain which would expose his identity as a sea monster, he is saved by a young girl named Giulia Marcovaldo. Giulia takes Luca and Alberto to her house where she lives for the summers with her one-handed father Massimo, an expert fish hunter seeking to kill a sea monster. Meanwhile, Daniela and Lorenzo are unable to find Luca anywhere, so they decide to go up to the surface to locate him. They begin splashing water on all of the boys there in an attempt to find Luca. Luca, Alberto and Giulia decide to enter the Portorosso Cup Triathlon together in hopes of winning money to buy a Vespa. The triathlon consists of three races: swimming laps, eating pasta, and riding a bike through the town. Each child decides to take up an individual task: Giulia takes up swimming, Alberto takes up eating pasta, and Luca takes up riding a bike after learning how. Over time, Ercole starts to become suspicious of the boys, and Luca and Giulia start to become closer to each other. When Giulia talks about going to school in another part of Italy where she spends the rest of the year, Luca develops an interest in it. Alberto becomes jealous of Luca and Giulia's growing friendship. After an argument, Alberto reveals his identity as a sea monster to Giulia. Luca does not do the same and instead acts afraid of Alberto, leaving Alberto to retreat to his hideout feeling betrayed. Back at Giulia's house, Giulia spills water on Luca, exposing him as a sea monster. Giulia sends him away, worrying that someone could hurt Luca if his true identity was discovered. Luca finds Alberto in his hideout sulking. After Luca questions Alberto about tally marks on the wall, Alberto reveals that he made the marks counting the days since his father left him there alone. Alberto is still mad at Luca and no longer wants to be a part of the triathlon, but Luca decides to enter with Giulia anyway. On the day of the triathlon, Luca and Giulia arrive without Alberto. After completing the first two challenges successfully, they enter the cycling stage. It begins to rain and Luca tries to avoid being turned back into a sea monster by stopping his bike under an awning. Alberto arrives at the scene with an umbrella to help Luca, but he gets wet and is transformed back into a sea monster. Ercole throws a net, trapping him. Risking his secret being exposed, Luca runs into the rain to save his friend. He frees Alberto but also gets transformed. Giulia tries to stop Ercole from hurting them but she ends up getting hurt herself. Luca and Alberto carry her back to town. When they get there, Ercole tries to kill Luca with a spear, but Luca puts the bully in his place. Everyone in the town of Portorosso sees that the sea monsters are not actually bad, especially Massimo, who thanks the boys for helping his daughter. Luca is reunited with his parents and they celebrate at Giulia's house. Later, Alberto reveals that he sold the Vespa they bought with the prize money to buy a train ticket for Luca to go to school with Giulia. Luca's family, Massimo, and Alberto (who has decided to stay in Portorosso) all see Luca and Giulia off at the train station. Luca waves goodbye to them and becomes a sea monster once again as the train travels away into the rain.

Contribute to this page

  • IMDb Answers: Help fill gaps in our data
  • Learn more about contributing

More from this title

More to explore.

Production art

Recently viewed

  • Update My Account
  • Find out more
  • Introducing Disney+

Inside Out 2

  • Lucasfilm Movies
  • Marvel Movies
  • Pixar Movies

Disney

* Minimum age requirements, Terms and Conditions Apply

 alt=

June 17, 2021

Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar’s original feature film “Luca” is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, Alberto (voice of Jack Dylan Grazer), but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water’s surface. “Luca” is directed by Academy Award® nominee Enrico Casarosa (“La Luna”) and produced by Andrea Warren (“Lava,” “Cars 3”).

Rated: G Runtime: 1h 35min Release Date: June 17, 2021

Directed By

Produced by.

Luca - Trailer 1

Luca - Trailer 1

Luca - Teaser Trailer 1

Luca - Teaser Trailer 1

More movies.

Inside Out 2

The Marvels

Elio

Haunted Mansion

Elemental

The Little Mermaid (2023)

Encanto

Raya And The Last Dragon

Ron’s Gone Wrong

Ron’s Gone Wrong

Turning Red

Turning Red

Onward

  • Update My Account
  • Find out more
  • Introducing Disney+
  • What to watch on Disney+
  • Marvel on Disney+
  • National Geographic on Disney+

Inside Out 2

  • Lucasfilm Movies
  • Marvel Movies
  • Pixar Movies
  • What's On
  • Frozen the Musical
  • The Lion King - London
  • Aladdin the Musical
  • Disney100: The Exhibition
  • Disney On Ice - Dream Big
  • Disneyland® Paris
  • Walt Disney World in Florida
  • Disney Cruise Line

Disney

* Terms and Conditions Apply | Plans start from just £4.99 a month

* Terms and Conditions Apply | €10.99 a month or €109.90 a year.

 alt=

Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar’s original feature film “Luca” is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, Alberto (voice of Jack Dylan Grazer), but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water’s surface. “Luca” is directed by Academy Award® nominee Enrico Casarosa (“La Luna”) and produced by Andrea Warren (“Lava,” “Cars 3”).

Rated: U Runtime: 1h 35min

Directed By

Produced by.

Luca - Trailer 1

Luca - Trailer 1

Luca - Teaser Trailer 1

Luca - Teaser Trailer 1

More movies.

Inside Out 2

The Marvels

Elio

Haunted Mansion

Elemental

The Little Mermaid (2023)

Encanto

Raya and the Last Dragon

Strange World

Strange World

Lightyear

Ron’s Gone Wrong

Turning Red

Turning Red

Onward

Disney+ Logo

Sorry, Disney+ is not available in your region.

  • Account Settings
  • The Disney Bundle
  • Parks & Travel
  • Walt Disney World
  • Disney Cruise Line
  • All Parks & Travel
  • Movies Anywhere
  • Disney Movie Insiders
  • 20th Century Studios
  • Accessories
  • Disney News
  • Disney on Broadway
  • Disney on Ice
  • Disney Live!
  • Walt Disney World Resort
  • Disneyland Resort
  • Aulani - A Disney Resort and Spa
  • Adventures by Disney
  • Disney Vacation Club
  • D23: The Official Disney Fan Club

Disney

The Animation and Effects Behind Pixar’s Luca , Now Streaming

Camille Jefferson

We’ve been eagerly awaiting the release of Pixar’s new animated film Luca , and it’s finally here! Directed by Enrico Casarosa (“La Luna”), produced by Andrea Warren (“Lava,” Cars 3 ), and starring Jacob Tremblay as Luca and Jack Dylan Grazer as Alberto, Luca is now streaming exclusively on Disney+ . 

The movie tells the story of Luca, a young, inquisitive sea monster who lives with his family under the sea, and has been warned to stay hidden from the dangerous humans above the surface in the nearby Italian village. He’s done so all his life, until one day he meets Alberto, another sea monster, who lives by his own set of rules, dreams, and aspirations. They quickly form a friendship that introduces Luca to a whole new world, aided by the discovery that the two can turn into humans outside of the water! Besides discovering new friends, new people, and a new way of life, Luca also learns how to move past his fears, to see people for more than what they first appear, and to believe in himself.

The film is a nod to director Enrico’s childhood in Italy, as well as his own friend named Alberto and what their friendship meant to him. The team wanted to honor the look and feel of that time, as well as the Italian village and its culture. “This is a period film,” explains producer Andrea Warren. “We wanted to capture an honesty to the era, no matter how stylized we were making it. [Enrico] drove home the simplicity of the time and place — basic clothing, kids running barefoot, [etc].” Daniela Strijleva, the film’s production designer, shares more background: “We visited the places Enrico went as a child. We watched him climb a 30-foot rock and dive in — realizing after the shock of it that he’d been doing it since he was a child. That extra layer of experiencing his memories and nostalgia really underscores his love of the place. And of course meeting people from the region — fishermen, locals — it gave us so much to work with.”

Luca and Alberto in the hideout

luca movie information

Now streaming on:

Pixar’s “Luca,” an Italian-set animated fairy tale concerning two young sea monsters exploring an unknown human world, offers the studio's hallmark visual splendor, yet fails to venture outside of safe waters. After story artist credits on big-time Pixar titles like “ Ratatouille ” and “ Coco ,” “Luca” serves as Enrico Casarosa ’s first time in the director’s chair. Borrowing elements from “ Finding Nemo ” and “ The Little Mermaid ,” Casarosa’s film follows two young Italian sea “monsters,” Luca ( Jacob Tremblay ) and Alberto ( Jack Dylan Grazer ). The former spends his days shepherding the little fish populating his seabed village away from fishing boats. But at night, as he lies awake in his seaweed bed, he dreams of living on the surface. 

Looming against his desires are his mother ( Maya Rudolph ) and father’s ( Jim Gaffigan ) fear from living by a human, sea-monster-hunting oceanfront village. Nevertheless, dry world affectations fall to the ocean floor: an alarm clock, a playing card, and a wrench. These items draw Luca closer to the surface. As does Alberto, an older, confident amphibian boy who now lives alone in a crumbling castle tower by the beach, and claims his father is temporarily traveling. 

If you’re wondering how these creatures with fins, scales, and tails can could live on among humans without being discovered, writers Jesse Andrews (“ Me and Earl and the Dying Girl ”) and Mike Jones (“ Soul ”) have a tidy solution for that. Rather than an evil witch granting him a human appearance, a la “The Little Mermaid,” the sea monsters here can naturally, magically turn mortal. Their ability isn’t controllable, however, as touching water reverts their skin back to their real scaly exterior. But for Luca, such power dangles greater temptation over him.  

Once on dry land, Alberto and Luca form a quick bond. They dream of buying a vespa and traveling the globe together. Their plans nearly come to a halt, however, when Luca’s frightful parents threaten to make him live his oddball Uncle Ugo ( Sacha Baron Cohen , essentially using his Borat voice in a fish) in the trenches. Instead, Luca runs away with Alberto to the town of Portorosso. There, they come across Giulia ( Emma Berman ), a red-headed, independently minded tomboy with dreams of winning the Portorosso cup—a traditional Italian triathlon consisting of swimming, cycling, and eating pasta—and her one-armed, burly father Massimo ( Marco Barricelli ). In a bid to earn enough money to buy a Vespa, the boys pair with Giulia to win the cup away from the evil five-time champion Ercole Visconti ( Saverio Raimondo ) and his goons while an entire town lays a bounty for sea monsters on their heads.  

The most distinct current coursing through “Luca” is freedom: that’s certainly what the Vespa represents, the ability to be unrestricted not just by sea, but by land too. The other thread winding around the folklorish narrative, however, is identity, or the people who truly are behind our public faces. The villainous Ercole is initially and seemingly well-loved, as though ripped from an Italian magazine. We soon discover that his love, somewhat like Gaston in “Beauty and the Beast” (another Disney flick attuned to true identities) actually rules through intimidation. The measured eroding of his care-free, buoyant persona into the narrative's real monster is predictable yet satisfying. 

The premise of the film also literally disguises Luca and Alberto as humans amongst the fish hunting Portorosso community. But in a deeper sense, many secrets lurk within Alberto, from the whereabouts of his dad to his general knowledge. He portrays himself to Luca as a world-weary traveler, the kind of friend who swears they’ve been to a place a million times, but has only walked past it. He also tells the impressionable Luca how the stars are actually fish swimming in a vast black ocean, that school is unnecessary, and to ignore his “Bruno” (or the tiny scared voice inside your head). His outsized confidence papers over his clear insecurities, especially as Luca first grows closer to Giulia and later thinks for himself. 

Similar to Ercole’s unsurprising turn to villainy, Alberto’s bubbling insecurities imbue the film's second half with an air of fait accompli and drag the initial animated delight to the deep depths of boredom. Why do another narrative about a girl stuck in the middle of two best friends? Why cast Giulia’s rich arc, a competitive girl pitched as an outsider, to the back seat? Without exploring her narrative, the primary story flows through the motions. And the ending, meant to recover some of her spark, only serves to tether her importance to the two boys. That is, the guys win, but really, we all win.  

“Luca” certainly isn’t without its charms. A visual splendor of blue and orange lighting blankets over the seaside setting, giving the sense that if I were to merely hug the screen it would warm me for days. Minute bits also land, like the fish that make sheep sounds, and the hilarious ways Luca’s mother and father careen through the town trying to find their son, throwing random children in the water. And Dan Rohmer’s propulsive, waltzy score recalls the fairytale vibes he breathed in “ Beasts of the Southern Wild ” on tracks like “ Once There Was A Hushpuppy .” But “Luca” retreads too much well-cultivated ground and reworks so many achingly familiar tropes as its best qualities sink to a murky bottom. While some material may hit with younger audiences, “Luca” makes for Pixar’s least enchanting, least special film yet.    

Available on June 18 on Disney+. 

Robert Daniels

Robert Daniels

Robert Daniels is an Associate Editor at RogerEbert.com. Based in Chicago, he is a member of the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA) and Critics Choice Association (CCA) and regularly contributes to the  New York Times ,  IndieWire , and  Screen Daily . He has covered film festivals ranging from Cannes to Sundance to Toronto. He has also written for the Criterion Collection, the  Los Angeles Times , and  Rolling Stone  about Black American pop culture and issues of representation.

Now playing

luca movie information

Glenn Kenny

luca movie information

The Space Race

Monica castillo.

luca movie information

The Book of Clarence

luca movie information

Brian Tallerico

luca movie information

Apolonia, Apolonia

Tomris laffly.

luca movie information

Bob Marley: One Love

Film credits.

Luca movie poster

Luca (2021)

Rated PG for rude humor, language, some thematic elements and brief violence.

Jacob Tremblay as Luca Paguro (voice)

Jack Dylan Grazer as Alberto Scorfano (voice)

Emma Berman as Giulia Marcovaldo (voice)

Maya Rudolph as Daniela Paguro (voice)

Jim Gaffigan as Lorenzo Paguro (voice)

Marco Barricelli as Massimo Marcovaldo (voice)

Saverio Raimondo as Ercole Visconti (voice)

Sandy Martin as Grandma Paguro (voice)

  • Enrico Casarosa
  • Jesse Andrews

Cinematographer

  • David Juan Bianchi
  • Jason Hudak
  • Catherine Apple

Latest blog posts

luca movie information

The People Who Never Stopped Loving Tenet

luca movie information

Berlin Film Festival 2024: Abiding Nowhere, Pepe, No Other Land

luca movie information

Movies Starring Real-Life Fathers and Daughters, Ranked

luca movie information

I Used to Hate The Phantom Menace, but I Didn’t Know How Good I Had It

Disney Wiki

  • Pixar films
  • Animated films
  • PG-rated films
  • Academy Award nominated films
  • Português do Brasil
  • View history

Luca is an American computer animated coming-of-age fantasy-comedy drama film produced by Pixar released on June 18 , 2021 . The film is directed by Enrico Casarosa , and produced by Andrea Warren as Pixar's 24th feature film. Originally intended to be shown in theaters, the film released on Disney+ on that date as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. [4] The film will be released in theaters nationwide on March 22 , 2024 .

  • 6 Reception
  • 10 Easter eggs
  • 11 Possible sequel or spin-off
  • 12 References
  • 13 External links

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera (Liguria), Disney and Pixar's original feature film Luca is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta, and endless scooter rides. Luca shares these adventures with his newfound best friend , but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water's surface. [5]

Two fishermen, Giacomo and Tommaso, are out at night trying to catch fish when a strange creature suddenly begins swiping things from their boat. Upon seeing it, they recognize it as a sea monster and try to catch it, but it escapes, much to their dismay.

Luca Paguro is a sea monster who farms goatfish for his family in a hidden area of the ocean. Luca, bored with his simple life, takes notice of a clock and a joker card that he found on the ocean floor. His mother, Daniela, is highly protective of him and warns him of being caught by anyone from the surface, while his father, Lorenzo, is slightly inattentive and distracted. On the other hand, his grandmother openly discusses her adventures on the surface in the past and seems supportive of Luca wanting to get out.

The next day, Luca follows a trail of more human objects until he is cornered by what looks like a deep-sea diver. The diver turns out to be another sea monster named Alberto Scorfano, who had been collecting the items to begin with and taking them back to his hideout on the surface. He forces Luca up to show him what it is like and discovers that he transforms into a human when he hits dry land. Scared but amazed, Luca returns to the ocean. He is confronted by Daniela for being gone for a long time, but Grandma protects Luca by claiming that she sent him out to get sea cucumbers.

Luca soon becomes attracted to going back to the surface, and Alberto eggs him to come up. Luca is mystified at having legs to stand on, and Alberto gives him a quick lesson on walking. Next, Alberto takes him to his hideout, a tall abandoned tower, and shows him all the things he has collected, including a poster for a Vespa, an Italian scooter. Alberto explains that it is a vehicle that can take you anywhere; Luca becomes entranced with the idea of owning one and traveling the world and suggests that they take the junk that he has collected to build one. They spend a couple of hours perfecting it before Luca realizes he needs to return home.

The next day, Luca and Alberto try out their scrap scooter by riding down the island's hill. Luca is forced to hold the ramp while Alberto rides it. Unfortunately, the scooter falls apart, but Alberto is more determined to build a better one, and he and Luca spend the next couple of days collecting and rebuilding Vespas. Meanwhile, Daniela and Lorenzo put together that Luca has been swimming off somewhere and become concerned for him. Eventually, Alberto convinces Luca to ride the hill down with him, but he is too scared. Alberto then informs him that he needs to declare "Silenzio, Bruno!" to encourage himself, and they ride down the hill and off the ramp before crashing into the water. However, the experience livens Luca, and later at night, he witnesses stars for the first time, though Alberto informs him that they are glowing fish that fill the sky. Luca has a wonderful dream of riding his Vespa with Alberto and flying into the sky to see the fish, but it ends with it raining and Luca turning back into a sea monster.

Luca awakens to realize he overstayed his welcome and rushes back home. His parents catch him and reveal that they have found the human objects he has accrued. To teach him a lesson, they plan to send him away to live with Uncle Ugo, Lorenzo's brother, in the deepest depths of the ocean and keep him away from the surface. Ugo, an Angler-like sea monster, is off-putting to Luca, and he runs away from his house. He meets back up with Alberto and suggests they get an actual Vespa so that they can run away together. They notice the town of Portorosso nearby towards the shore, and Alberto agrees to take him there to see Signore Vespa and ask for one, despite the abundance of humans there.

Luca and Alberto sneak into town and take in their new surroundings, though it is quickly apparent that they do not know their way around. When a child beckons that they kick a ball back to them, Luca accidentally kicks it at a shiny red Vespa owned by Ercole Visconti, a self-entitled teenager. Ercole rudely insults the two "out-of-towners" and mocks them before trying to shove Luca into the fountain. Luca and Alberto are rescued by a fish delivery girl named Giulia Marcovaldo, who views Ercole as her arch-nemesis. After Ercole is distracted by news of a reward for catching a sea monster, she rides off with them into town and excitedly tells them that as "underdogs," they need to stick together. She explains that she wants to enter the local Portorosso Cup Triathlon to end Ercole's "reign of terror" (she had lost the previous years due to her vomiting during the competition). While Alberto is uninterested in working with her, Luca is intrigued, especially when she mentions that they can win money to potentially buy a cheap Vespa. Luca manages to coerce Alberto into teaming up with Giulia, and she agrees.

Meanwhile, Daniela and Lorenzo, learning that Luca has run away, head to the surface to find him. They immediately run into an issue when they cannot identify where Luca might be, and begin getting all the children wet in an effort to reveal him. The Triathlon segments are swimming, eating, and bike riding. Giulia agrees to do the swimming segment while Alberto does the eating and Luca rides the bike. Giulia helps Luca ride one when it is apparent that he has never ridden before. Afterward, Luca and Alberto claim that they are runaways and simply want to travel the world. Sympathizing with them, Giulia takes them to her home, where they meet her father, Massimo, a giant, one-armed fisherman. Luca and Alberto are frightened of Massimo due to his claim of hunting fish, though his lost arm actually came from birth. While Luca and Alberto hide their fish appearances, the cat Machiavelli catches their true form. Finally, Giulia convinces Massimo to give her the money to enter the competition and allows Luca and Alberto to stay in her treehouse.

In the morning, the kids enter the competition, where they are once again accosted by Ercole and his peons Ciccio and Guido. When Luca gives Giulia words to insult Ercole with, he buckles and encourages them to enter so that he can beat them. Giulia trains to swim while Luca and Alberto watch her. However, Ercole arrives to mess with them and nearly discovers their secret. Luckily, Giulia distracts them enough for them to hide. Alberto is forced to eat various types of pasta to prepare himself. Massimo takes an interest in Alberto and takes him on various fish outings, forming a father-like bond with him. Luca learns to ride the bike better, but he becomes frightened of riding it down upon reaching the top of a hill in town. During this time, Daniela and Lorenzo find Luca, and he becomes paranoid about them catching and bringing him home.

Soon, Luca begins to enjoy hanging out with Giulia, much to Alberto's consternation. As Massimo takes Alberto out for a job, Giulia tells Luca that she only lives with her father during the summer but that for the rest of the year, she goes to live with her mother in Genova and attend school. Upon hearing Luca believing that the stars are fish, she takes him to a telescope, and he sees the stars up close and Saturn, which is Giulia's favorite. Luca begins to read her books and takes an interest in school and learning new things, and Giulia allows Luca to keep her astronomy book. Alberto returns and hears about what Luca learned, which he is unimpressed by. He shows him the Vespa they spotted earlier to remind them of their goal, and tells him that it is difficult for them to fit in as sea monsters. Ercole and his boys attempt to terrorize them, but they manage to outwit them and head back to Giulia's.

After getting to the top of the hill in Portorosso again, Alberto takes control of Luca's bike, and the two of them ride down the hill and crash into the ocean again. Luca chastises Alberto for disrupting their chance at winning and adds that he is thinking of going to school with Giulia. Alberto tells Luca that no one will accept them because of their sea monster origin. When Giulia finds them, Alberto angrily reveals his true self to her. Giulia's screams alert Ercole and his boys, who attempt to capture him. Luca, unwilling to show his true self, pretends to be shocked, as a heartbroken Alberto flees back into the ocean. Massimo, hearing that Alberto is gone, looks for him while Luca tries to convince Giulia to carry on with the Triathlon without him. Giulia tosses water at Luca and learns that he, too, is a sea monster. Scared about what might happen to him, she tells him that he needs to leave for his own good, even though she does not want him to.

Luca swims back to the island to find that Alberto had wrecked the place. Upon seeing etches in the wall, he asks him what they are for, to which Alberto reveals to him that his father had abandoned him long ago and never returned. Since then, he had convinced himself that he does not need anyone and tells him to leave him alone. Luca instead tells Alberto that he has inspired him to embrace life and that he will enter the Triathlon by himself and win them the money to buy the Vespa.

On the day of the Triathlon, Luca shows up separately, in a diving suit, for the first challenge, with Giulia representing herself. They swim out into the ocean and manage to make it back. They then enter the eating section, where Giulia quickly teaches Luca to eat with a fork. Both manage to finish and get on their bikes as Ercole rushes to his. Lorenzo and Daniela try to stop Luca, but he avoids them to finish the race. Finally, he makes it to the top of the hill, but it begins to rain, and he hides under an awning. At that moment, Alberto suddenly arrives with an umbrella to help Luca, but Ercole trips him up, revealing his sea monster form. As everyone proceeds to net him, with Ercole grabbing his harpoon, Luca surmises the courage to ride into the rain and rescues Alberto as they ride down the hill.

Ercole chases after the two of them while Giulia catches up to them. As they near the end of the finish line, Giulia crashes her bike into Ercole as Luca and Alberto stop and rush over to help her up. The townsfolk and Ercole surround Luca and Alberto to kill them, but Massimo stops them. Seeing that they were trying to help Giulia, he tells everyone that the "monsters" are Luca and Alberto and defends them. He further points out that they won the race (their bikes made it across the finish line) and thus finally defeated Ercole. A majority of the town gives up hunting the monsters and accepts them, and Ciccio and Guido, fed up with his abuse, turns on Ercole and toss him (and his wool sweater) into the fountain.

Daniela and Lorenzo reveal themselves and happily reunite with Luca, while two elderly women, whom Luca and Alberto had a brief interaction with, also reveal themselves as sea monsters. Finally, Luca, Alberto, and Giulia win the cup and prize money to purchase the Vespa. Everyone gathers at the Marcovaldo house to celebrate, where Grandma Paguro also joins them (she admits to coming to the surface on the weekends). As Luca and Giulia run off together, Alberto begins to rethink his dream of the Vespa.

Giulia prepares to go to Genova now that the summer is over and gets on the train. Alberto shows up to reveal that he sold the Vespa to get Luca a ticket to go as well. He tells him that he has decided to stay in Portorosso and live with Massimo, and that Lorenzo and Daniela made plans for Luca to attend school with Giulia. While saddened that this means he will be separated from his friend, he thanks him and gets on the train just as it rains, once again revealing their true forms. Luca looks out at the ocean and sees the clouds clearing up over the island where he met Alberto, knowing that he will always remember their time together no matter where he is.

During the credits, Luca meets Giulia's mother, an artist who accepts his fish origin. He attends school with her and shows off to the class, much to their astonishment. Alberto has accepted Massimo as a father figure and has quickly befriended the other kids in town while working numerous jobs. Lorenzo, Daniela, and Grandma Paguro have accepted Massimo and Alberto into their family, and vice versa, and are accepted as neighbors in Portorosso. Luca and Giulia use a phone to stay connected to the people in Portorosso.

In a post-credits scene, Uncle Ugo is down in the deep talking to a goatfish about how much he will like it down there with him, apparently unaware that he is not talking to Luca.

  • Jacob Tremblay as Luca Paguro
  • Jack Dylan Grazer as Alberto Scorfano
  • Emma Berman as Giulia Marcovaldo
  • Saverio Raimondo as Ercole Visconti
  • Maya Rudolph as Daniela Paguro
  • Marco Barricelli as Massimo Marcovaldo
  • Jim Gaffigan as Lorenzo Paguro
  • Peter Sohn as Ciccio
  • Lorenzo Crisci as Guido
  • Marina Massironi as Mrs. Marsigliese
  • Sandy Martin as Grandma Paguro
  • Sacha Baron Cohen as Uncle Ugo
  • Elisa Gabrielli as Concetta Aragosta
  • Mimi Maynard as Pinuccia Aragosta
  • Giacomo Gianniotti as Giacomo
  • Gino La Monica as Tommaso
  • Jonathan Nichols as Don Eugenio
  • Francesca Fanti as a cop
  • Jim Pirri as Mr. Branzino
  • Enrico Casarosa (also director) as an angry fisherman and a Scopa player

Originally, Italian musician Ennio Morricone was considered to compose the soundtrack, but died before he was asked to do so. However, Dan Romer was instead revealed to be the film's composer on April 1 , 2021 . The soundtrack includes songs by Mina, Edoardo Bennato, Gianni Morandi, Rita Pavone, and Quartetto Cetra in addition to operas by Giacomo Puccini and Gioachino Rossini.

Casarosa stated that the movie is a celebration of friendship, and "a love letter to the summers of our youth - those formative years when you're finding yourself", [6] inspired by his childhood in Genoa, with Luca based on himself and Alberto on his best friend of the same name, Alberto Surace. [7] Casarosa stated: "My best friend Alberto was a bit of a troublemaker, [while] I was very timid and had a bit of a sheltered life — we couldn't have been more different ... Alberto pushed me out of my comfort zone, and pushed me off many cliffs, metaphorically and not. I probably would not be here if I didn't learn to chase my dreams from him. It's these types of deep friendships that I wanted to talk about in Luca , and that is what's at the heart of this film." [6]

The sea monsters, based on old Italian myths and regional folklore, were defined by Casarosa as a "metaphor for feeling different", [8] explaining: "We were also a bit of 'outsiders', so it felt right to use sea monsters to express the idea that we felt a little different and not cool as kids". [6] Producer Andrea Warren expanded: "We always liked the idea that the metaphor of being a sea monster can apply to so many different things. There is a theme of openness, showing oneself and self-acceptance, as well as community acceptance. Confronting the idea that there's more to sea monsters than they realized. You know that they've only seen it through one perspective, one lens, and so I think that that's a wonderful theme in the film, which is that those ideas weren't right and that there's more to learn." [6] Casarosa agreed: "We hope that 'sea monster' could be a metaphor for all [manners] of feeling different — like being a teen or even pre-teen — any moment where you feel odd. It felt like a wonderful way to talk about that and having to accept ourselves first, whatever way we feel different." [6]

Some have seen Luca and Alberto hiding their true sea monster identities as an allegory for people who are members of the LGBTQ+ community, feeling as though they need to hide their true selves in order to be accepted. [9] Similarities and parallels to director Luca Guadagnino's film Call Me by Your Name , which centers on a romantic relationship between a grown man and teenage boy in Italy, were also pointed out. [10] These prompted the question whether Luca and Alberto are gay; [11] however, Casarosa said that the characters were just friends and that the parallels to Guadagnino's film were only a coincidence, stating: "I love Luca's movies and he's such a talent, but it truly goes without saying that we really willfully went for a pre-pubescent story ... This is all about platonic friendships." [12]

Casarosa has stated that some people have interpreted the story as being a metaphor for refugees and immigrants as well, however just like those who have made comparisons to the LGBTQ+ community, he admitted that this was unintentional, but that he was welcome to all interpretations. [13] He later admitted that the film was intended to be a metaphor for race and while romance between the leads was only briefly discussed, it was never meant to be a focal point to the story, "some people seem to get mad that I'm not saying yes or no, but I feel like, well, this is a movie about being open to any difference." He added that he intended for the film's message to be about "being different" and felt that he had achieved doing so by getting such a broad response, "some people seem to get mad that I'm not saying yes or no, but I feel like, well, this is a movie about being open to any difference." [14]

On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 90% based on 260 reviews, with an average rating of 7.30/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Slight but suffused with infectious joy, the beguiling Luca proves Pixar can play it safe while still charming audiences of all ages." [15] According to Metacritic, which assigned a weighted average score of 71 out of 100 based on 52 critics, the film received "generally favorable reviews". [16]

Alonso Duralde of the TheWrap wrote: " Luca is sweet and affecting, capturing the bond that strangers can build over a summer, and how that friendship can endure. And like its shape-shifting protagonists, it's got plenty going on beneath the surface." [17] From The Hollywood Reporter , David Rooney said that "the real magic of Luca is its visuals. The character designs are appealing both in the marine world and on land, and the richness of the settings in both realms is a constant source of pleasure. The play of light on the gloriously blue water's surface is almost photorealistic at times, while a sunset spreading its orange glow over rocks on the shoreline makes you yearn to be there." [18]

Charlie Ridgely from ComicBook.com praised the film for its uniqueness, feeling that it highly deviated from Pixar's usual narrative formula and clichés, but it didn't make it "lesser" than other of the company's classics like Toy Story and Up , highlighting the animation, the design of the Italian Riviera, the score, and the story. [19]

However, Philip Desemlyn, writing for Time Out, branded the film a "letdown", writing "Charming but slight, Luca definitely isn't Pixar firing on all cylinders. The studio's trademark daring, pin sharp sight gags, and big ideas are missing from a fishy coming-of-age yarn that's a little damp around the edges." [20]

Wiki

  • However, it is the third Disney+ film to eventually receive a theatrical release after Soul and Turning Red .
  • Thus, it is also the sixth animated film to be released straight to digital instead of having a theatrical release in the United States following the COVID-19 pandemic; the first being Warner Animation Group 's Scoob! (which would eventually get a theatrical release one year later), Pixar's own Soul , Paramount Animation / Nickelodeon Movies ' The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run (which had a theatrical release in Canada, though, and was already released on Netflix internationally as the second animated film to do so in international countries), and Sony Pictures Animation 's The Mitchells vs. The Machines and Wish Dragon .
  • Due to Disney+ being limited in most of Europe and Asia , the following countries are where Luca got a theatrical release: Albania, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, Greece , Hong Kong , Hungary , Israel , Kenya, Latvia , Lebanon, Lithuania, Maldives, Nepal , Pakistan, Poland , Qatar, Romania , Russia , Serbia , Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea , Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam.
  • This is Enrico Casarosa's first Pixar film. He previously directed the short La Luna .
  • The third Disney animated film to be released on June 18, after Tarzan ( 1999 ) and Toy Story 3 ( 2010 ).
  • According to Enrico Casarosa, he describes the film as an "homage to Fellini and other classic Italian filmmakers, with a dash of Miyazaki in the mix too." [22]
  • In the original version of the film, Luca and Alberto had a third friend named Ciccio, and was originally going to be about them using magical tokens in an attempt to permanently become human, with the climax being Alberto transforming into a giant kraken and Luca defending him and keeping him safe. During an interview with Casarosa, he revealed that Ciccio was converted into one of Ercole's goons so that the film could have more focus on the friendship between Luca and Alberto, and the climax of Alberto turning into a giant kraken was abandoned so that the story can be told on a smaller, simpler scale. [23]
  • The film is meant to be a tribute to Casarosa's childhood; more specifically, the movie is about "friendship in that pre-puberty world." When the film's first trailer was released, viewers compared the film to Call Me By Your Name , a film that centered on a romantic relationship between two men in Italy. This had led many to believe that the characters of Luca and Alberto were intended to be a gay couple, but Casarosa denied this; stating that the film is simply about a platonic friendship between three children, Giulia included. [24]
  • Multiple locations in Luca are inspired by real Italian sights.
  • Alberto Surace, who inspired the character of Alberto Scorfano, voices a fisherman in the Italian dub version. [26]
  • According to Casarosa, this film is set around 1959 . [27]
  • Pixar's 13th film to have a June release following Cars , Ratatouille , WALL-E , Toy Story 3 , Cars 2 , Brave , Monsters University , Inside Out , Finding Dory , Cars 3 , Incredibles 2 , and Toy Story 4 .
  • This is Pixar's fourth film to release on the same day as a previous film with this film releasing on June 18th; 11 years apart from Toy Story 3 , the first was The Good Dinosaur , which released on November 25th; 17 years apart from A Bug's Life , the second was Coco which released on November 22nd; 22 years apart from Toy Story , and the third was Toy Story 4 which released on June 21st; 6 years apart from Monsters University .
  • Luca is rated PG for "rude humor, language, some thematic elements and brief violence".
  • The film celebrates Pixar's 35th anniversary.
  • This is the first Pixar film to be produced in 1.85:1 widescreen aspect ratio since Finding Dory .
  • This is the second Pixar movie not to feature John Ratzenberger in a voice role after Soul , the movie before it, implying that they most likely retired this gimmick. Casarosa suggested having Peter Sohn replace him as the voice to appear in every Pixar film. [28]
  • This is the third Pixar film to have a music score composed by a non-recurring composer after Brave (which had its music score composed by Patrick Doyle ) and Soul (which had its music score composed by Trent Raznor, Atticus Ross, and Jon Batiste).
  • The headline on the newspaper that Giulia gives to her father Massimo in the film reads "Mostro Avvistato All'isola", which translates to "Monster Spotted on the Island" in English.
  • The phrase that Alberto says, "Piacere, Girolamo Trombetta", is an Italian play-on-words, in which the first name Girolamo sounds a bit like "giro la mano" ("I twist my hand") whereas the surname Trombetta means "trumpet", and while pronouncing the name there's a handshake that involves twisting the hands and pulling back like playing a trumpet. It roughly translates to "Nice to meet you. My name is Twisty Trumpet."
  • This is the second Pixar film to feature live-action footage, the first being WALL-E .
  • As with La Luna , the design and animation were inspired by hand-drawn and stop motion works and Hayao Miyazaki 's style.
  • This is the second Pixar film that was originally going to be released in theaters, but delayed to Disney+ after Soul .
  • This is the third Disney+ original movie to get a home video release, being Mulan and Soul .
  • This is the seventh Pixar film to have a post credits scene after Finding Nemo , Cars , Brave , Monsters University , Finding Dory , and Cars 3 .
  • The eleventh Disney film to feature the full 2011 Disney logo as a closing logo, after Finding Dory , Moana , Cars 3 , Coco , Incredibles 2 , Toy Story 4 , The Lion King , Frozen II , Soul , and Raya and the Last Dragon .
  • The 6th Pixar film to include the words "The End" at the end of the film, after A Bug's Life , Finding Nemo , Ratatouille , Finding Dory , and Coco .
  • Most of this movie was made at home during COVID-19.
  • This is the second Pixar film to include the Reveille call with the first being Cars .

Easter eggs

  • When Luca and Alberto build a Vespa from scratch, instead of the mirror, there is a photo of Italian actor Marcello Mastroianni .
  • At one point, Luca and Giulia are seen reading Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio . During an imaginary sequence, versions of Pinocchio , the Fox and the Cat can be seen.
  • One of the toys in Giulia's room resembles Donald Duck .
  • A record cover in Giulia's room has the name "Nicolo Pitera", a reference to Pixar animator Nick Pitera.
  • In Portorosso there are some posters advertising the movies La Strada and Roman Holiday ; a poster in the Portorosso plaza is also very similar to a poster for 1954 's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea .
  • A Hidden Mickey appears as three round clouds when Luca imagines himself and Alberto riding in a Vespa.
  • One of the goatfishes, over 24 to represent the films Pixar made so far, reference Mona Lisa and director Enrico.
  • The Pizza Planet Truck can be spotted during the bike chase between Luca, Alberto, Ercole and Giulia. As there are no four-wheeled vehicles in the film, the Pizza Planet Truck instead appears as a three-wheeled pickup truck.
  • The number at the front of the train is 94608, which is the zip code for Pixar's headquarters in Emeryville, California. Pixar's address (1200 Park Ave.) also appears as the number of the train carriage boarded by Luca (1200PA).
  • The Luxo Ball can be seen on a rooftop during the race.
  • One of the boats has the name "Elena" written on it, a reference to Elena Rivera from Coco .
  • The boy from La Luna appears during the film's credits.
  • When it starts raining in Portorosso, everyone brings out black umbrellas, while Alberto's umbrella is blue, most likely a reference to The Blue Umbrella .
  • The diving helmet worn by Alberto and Luca is similar to the helmet in Philip Sherman 's tank in Finding Nemo .
  • During the scene where Luca and Alberto first meet Massimo, the music playing is "Largo al factotum", a famous aria from the Rossini opera Il barbiere di Siviglia, ossia L'inutile precauzione (known in English as The Barber of Seville ), a piece notable for having been used in many cartoons featuring opera singers; including being sung by Willie the Whale in the short The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met from Make Mine Music (where it was called merely "Figaro" after the most famous part of the aria where the lead character sings "Figaro" over and over).
  • The Grape Soda cap from Up appears on a poster in Portorosso.

Possible sequel or spin-off

Enrico Casarosa joked during production about a spin-off focusing on Uncle Ugo and his life in the deep. In all seriousness, he suggested that the sequel be the equivalent of The Parent Trap and focus on Giulia trying to get her parents back together while Luca "will somehow conquer the world" now that he is not afraid to hide who he is. Emma Berman suggested that the sequel feature Luca being accepted closer to Giulia's family and show how he is treated in school. Jack Dylan Grazer wanted to see Alberto suddenly attend school and take a home economics class after somehow getting married in Portorosso. Jim Gaffigan stated that the sequel could see Lorenzo and Daniela trying to adjust to human life in Portorosso, only to end up in the bustling city. [29]

Sometime after the film's release, Disney+ sent a survey to subscribers asking about their opinion of the movie and asked "how likely would each household member [want] to watch another movie involving the characters and world of Luca if it became available," implying that the studio intends to produce a sequel at some point. [30] However, in October 2022 , Casarosa stated that a sequel is currently not in the works and he is instead working on another movie, presumably with Pixar. [31]

A short film titled Ciao Alberto was released on November 12 , 2021 and serves as a loose sequel that follows the relationship between Alberto and Massimo.

  • ↑ https://twitter.com/whereisjones/status/1288897775975817216?s=20
  • ↑ http://filmmusicreporter.com/2021/04/01/dan-romer-scoring-pixars-luca/
  • ↑ https://www.boxofficemojo.com/title/tt12801262/
  • ↑ https://deadline.com/2021/03/black-widow-cruella-disney-plus-theaters-day-and-date-release-1234720116/
  • ↑ https://www.pixar.com/upcoming
  • ↑ 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Camille Jefferson (28 April 2021). " Exploring Friendship, Acceptance, and Overcoming Fear in Pixar's Luca ". news.disney.com .
  • ↑ Perri Nemiroff (25 February 2021). " What Do Pixar Sea Monsters Look Like? 'Luca' Director Enrico Casarosa Explained ". Collider .
  • ↑ Bill Desowitz (25 February 2021). " 'Luca' First Trailer: Pixar's Italian Coming-of-Age Sea Monster Feature Is Quirky and Inclusionary ". IndieWire .
  • ↑ Abi Travis (25 February 2021). " Wait a Sec — Are the Main Characters in Pixar's 'Luca' Gay? ". Distractify .
  • ↑ Josh Kurp (30 July 2020). " Pixar's New Movie Is Inspiring Peach Jokes And Comparisons To 'Call Me By Your Name' ". Uproxx .
  • ↑ Kevin Polowy (25 February 2021). " Pixar's 'Luca' debuts trailer: Director says coming-of-age adventure influenced by Miyazaki, Fellini and 'Stand by Me' ". Yahoo .
  • ↑ " Is Luca Pixar’s first gay movie? How the Disney+ film’s ‘deeper story’ and animation design came together, with a little help from Renaissance maps and sea iguanas ". South China Morning Post (June 22, 2021).
  • ↑ Taylor, Drew (January 5, 2022). " ‘Luca’ Director Enrico Casarosa on the Film’s Underlying LGBTQ+ Themes ". The Wrap .
  • ↑ " Luca (2021) ".
  • ↑ " Luca Reviews ".
  • ↑ Duralde, Alsonso (June 16, 2021). " 'Luca' Film Review: Pixar's Sweet Sea Monster Tale Has a Lot Going on Beneath the Surface ". TheWrap .
  • ↑ Rooney, David (June 16, 2021). " Pixar's 'Luca': Film Review ". The Hollywood Reporter .
  • ↑ Ridgely, Charlie (June 16, 2021). " Luca Review: This Soulful Summer Spectacle Is an Instant Pixar Classic ", ComicBook.com .  
  • ↑ " Mamma Mia! Luca is a bit of a letdown " (en) . Time Out Worldwide .
  • ↑ https://thedisinsider.com/2020/08/10/luca-main-character-reportedly-pays-homage-to-a-studio-ghibli-classic/
  • ↑ https://www.empireonline.com/movies/news/luca-pixar-mythical-coming-of-age-exclusive-image/
  • ↑ https://screenrant.com/luca-original-ending-sea-monsters-kraken-pixar-movie/
  • ↑ https://www.polygon.com/22407617/luca-gay-characters-pixar-call-me-by-your-name
  • ↑ https://www.pixarpost.com/2021/02/pixar-luca-title.html
  • ↑ " I personaggi principali del film Disney Pixar “Luca” e le voci italiane " (Italian) . TeamWorld (17 June 2021).
  • ↑ https://twitter.com/sketchcrawl/status/1415332736043081730
  • ↑ " He’s not. I wanted to start a new tradition: putting Peter Sohn’s voice in every movie! (Have no idea if anyone will keep to it after us) ". Twitter (June 18, 2021).
  • ↑ Weiss, Josh (June 21, 2021). " THE 'LUCA' TEAM OFTEN JOKED ABOUT A TV SPIN-OFF FOR ONE OF THE PIXAR FILM'S MOST BIZARRE CHARACTERS ". Syfy .
  • ↑ Simmons, Jordan (June 29, 2021). " Exclusive: Disney+ Survey Hints at a Potential Luca Sequel ". The Disinsider .
  • ↑ " A sequel is not currently in the works. I love Luca and it’s characters of course … but I’m developing a new original film. ". Twitter (October 7, 2022).

External links

WikipediaListLink

  • [1] on Luca Wiki

16

  • 2 Mortimer Mouse
  • 3 Inside Out 2
  • DISNEY.COM.AU
  • Sign Up to Disney+
  • About Disney+ & Star
  • Marvel on Disney+
  • Star Wars on Disney+
  • Inside Out 2
  • 20th Century Studios
  • What's New
  • Disney Ears
  • Pin Trading
  • DESTINATIONS
  • Disney Cruise Line
  • Disneyland Resort California
  • Walt Disney World Resort Florida
  • LIVE EVENTS
  • What's On
  • Beauty and the Beast
  • Marvel Universe Live
  • The Latest News
  • National Geographic
  • SIGN UP FOR NEWS
  • Sign Up To Disney+
  • Disney News
  • Travel News
  • Star Wars News
  • Marvel News

Disney

Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy

Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar’s original feature film “Luca” is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water’s surface. Directed by Academy Award® nominee Enrico Casarosa (“La Luna”) and produced by Andrea Warren (“Lava,” “Cars 3”), “Luca” is now streaming, only on Disney+

Rated: G Runtime: 2h 0min Release Date: June 18, 2021

Directed By

Produced by.

Rated G

Disney and Pixar's Luca | Official Trailer | Disney+

Visit Portorosso. Watch the trailer for Disney and Pixar's Luca​, streaming on Disney+.

Luca teaser trailer

Luca | Teaser Trailer

Disney and Pixar’s newest adventure makes a splash this June. Meet Luca.

NEWS DISNEY+ Jun 16

Luca and alberto make a splash into our list of favourite pixar friendships.

June 16, 2021

NEWS DISNEY MOVIES Nov 22

Home is where the magic lives with disney’s encanto.

November 22, 2021

luca movie information

Movies to watch at home

Disney's Encanto movie poster

Jungle Cruise

Raya and the Last Dragon poster

Raya and the Last Dragon

luca movie information

The Lion King | 2019

Disney and Pixar's Turning Red at the Pixar Film Festival, Australia.

Aladdin | 2019

luca movie information

Dumbo | 2019

Disney and Pixar's Coco poster

Incredibles 2

luca movie information

Artemis Fowl

luca movie information

Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2

luca movie information

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

Pixar's Luca Review

The little merman..

Nicole Clark Avatar

Pixar’s newest film Luca is set in the sunbaked Italian sea town of Portorosso, and in the nearby Mediterranean waters where a shy young sea monster, Luca, lives with his family. Fans of The Little Mermaid might find this premise familiar—Luca’s parents forbid him from going to the surface, due to the threat of local fishermen. But there is one key twist: sea monsters are able to transform into humans once on land. Luca’s world changes when a new sea monster friend, Alberto, pulls him up to the surface, showing him that living as a human can be fun.

Luca is a solid summer watch, and one whose uniquely stylized animation will be particularly enjoyable on a large screen. It’s a nice paring back from some of Pixar’s more ostentatious, serious films like Soul or Inside Out , which took on high-minded concepts like “what is the meaning of life” or “how do we feel things.” But Luca doesn’t quite stand up to Pixar’s stellar reputation for making smaller themes feel consequential through striking characterization and storytelling. Its themes of coming-of-age resemble too much of Pixar’s existing catalog—and without a narrative that really makes these themes feel fresh.

There’s simplicity and clarity to the smallness of Luca’s world, one that matches the film’s story of friendship and exploration as a means of coming-of-age. This really comes through in the film’s world-building details, which give it a charming, local, and lived in feel both undersea and on land. At home, Luca scythes seaweed—which reads like harvesting fields of wheat—and herds bleating fish, establishing him as part of a rural, farming family. Portorosso is similarly charming, drawn from director Enrico Casarosa’s own time spent in the Italian Riviera. The town’s piazza bustles with children playing soccer, men toting harpoons from their boats, and women gossiping over ice cream.

The Visual Development of Pixar's Luca

luca movie information

Annually, the town hosts the Portorosso Cup, a kind of triathlon (with a funny twist), which Luca and Alberto set their eyes on—the prize money would buy them a Vespa, which they see as a ticket to freedom. But Portorosso is also famous for hunting sea monsters and any time the boys are exposed to water—including small things like spilling a glass—they transform into their sea creature selves, and risk getting caught.

Though this premise offers lots of space for laughter, Luca and Alberto’s backstories are too thinly drawn for viewers to really emotionally invest in their friendship. These backstories are essential parts of any Pixar film, and without them Luca lacks a kind of deeper emotional core. So much of Up’s narrative propulsion, for example, comes from its moving opening sequence, which details the main character meeting the love of his life, and the desire to honor her memory after she dies. Marlon’s anxieties in Finding Nemo stay constant across the film, conveying just how much he must love his son in order to leave his anemone and chase him down. And, of course, Coco’s “Remember Me” is an instant tearjerker, a testament to just how affecting the film is.

Disney+ Spotlight: June 2021

Click through for a spotlight on some of the most notable June 2021 Disney+ releases.

By contrast, Alberto’s genuinely affecting origin story is also withheld until close to the end of the film. His friendship with Luca is built quickly over inside jokes, Vespa building montages, and a kind of admiration familiar to anyone who has envied a best friend. But their relationship never quite feels intimate or lived in, thanks to withholding that vulnerability. (And while Pixar fans speculated Luca might be a queer film, Casarosa stated the film’s core friendship is purely platonic ). Luca’s parents also feel dramatically overbearing when they forbid Luca to go to the surface—while the film shows the region’s threat to sea monsters, it doesn’t give Luca’s family much personal connection to that threat.

Luca’s animation style does offer a compelling argument for watching it in theaters. Casarosa’s style is distinctly warm, moving towards a more painterly feel. In Luca, Pixar’s typically photoreal techniques for environment design are swapped out for more sculptural visions of the ocean, sunsets, and rolling hills. The studio tends to create visual awe through moments of bombast—think of Coco’s incredible visual richness. Luca captures the beauty of leaving home by paring down detail, in favor of punchy framing and lighting, pulling off a kind of awe as Luca leaves the sea for the first time, gazes at the stars, or watches the sun rise.

Where environment designs trend toward the serene, Casarosa’s character designs echo the more exaggerated comedic shapes you might see in Saturday morning cartoons. This gives the film a richer comedic language to work with. Some of the character designs are particularly delightful—Luca and Alberto’s human friend Giulietta has wonderfully triangular hair that reflects the exaggerated bell bottom flare of her jeans. Her dad is designed as an intimidatingly huge, square figure. The transformation between sea monster and human is similarly primed for comedy—with Luca and Alberto scrambling to hide each other any time they’ve touched water.

The film’s visual language also has some clear influences. Hayao Miyazaki-esque dream sequences are visually striking, and surprisingly recognizable despite the film being animated in 3d. Luca imagines himself in flight with Alberto, soaring through the sky on a Vespa in sequences that are reminiscent of Casarosa’s beautiful short film La Luna. They also bring to mind Miyazaki’s Porco Rosso, a film whose title is close to the name of Luca’s Portorosso.

While pretty, these sequences are often more style than substance—especially when reflecting on Miyazaki’s usage. When Jiro Horikoshi dreams he is flying in The Wind Rises, for example, the sequence is emotionally affecting, because this man’s lifelong dream of building airplanes was achieved in the context of designing fighter planes for World War II. This isn’t to say Luca needs to be so hefty—the comparison to Miyazaki is obviously a lofty one, and Luca is a sweet summer film about self-discovery—but it does point to why Luca’s story doesn’t quite land.

Pixar is known for masterfully making smaller tensions take on broader narrative stakes. These can be goofy and still work, like Mike Wazowski and Sully risking both their health and jobs, as they hide little girl Boo, as well as risking upending the entire monster scare economy. Luca, instead, relies on well-worn coming-of-age tropes—overbearing parents, extroverted best friends—without building realistic intimacy, or explaining how Luca and Alberto fit into the broader sea monster community.

Though Luca and Alberto leave their home undersea, their story ultimately remains on the shallow end.

Director Enrico Casarosa’s debut feature-length Pixar film Luca is an enjoyable, sun-drenched summer flick about adolescence and independence. Its serene animation style defies Pixar’s typical photorealistic approach, with a few particularly striking sequences inspired by Hayao Miyazaki. But Luca is ultimately hamstrung by a lack of depth in its storytelling, and its character development, keep it from standing up to Pixar’s stellar storytelling reputation.

Nicole Clark Avatar Avatar

More Reviews by Nicole Clark

Ign recommends.

Fallout: New Vegas Returns Through Magic: The Gathering

  • Newsletters

Site search

  • Israel-Hamas war
  • 2024 election
  • Supreme Court
  • Animal welfare
  • Climate change
  • What to watch
  • All explainers
  • Future Perfect

Filed under:

Luca is a Pixar fable about sea monsters, friendship, and pasta

Now streaming on Disney+, it’s a tale about accepting others — and yourself.

Share this story

  • Share this on Facebook
  • Share this on Twitter
  • Share this on Reddit
  • Share All sharing options

Share All sharing options for: Luca is a Pixar fable about sea monsters, friendship, and pasta

A cartoon boy floating the sea. The submerged part of him has green scales.

Luca is probably the most summery movie that Pixar’s ever made — a light, gentle, sweet tale of a young boy and his best friend who go on an adventure in a tiny Italian town. (They’re also both sea monsters, but more on that later.) There is pasta and gelato, fountains and cycling, a mustache-twirling villain and starry night skies. It’s a tiny vacation with a healthy serving of imagination.

Director Enrico Casarosa says the look of his new film is inspired by everything from Renaissance maps — the kind haunted around the edges by scaly sea monsters — to Japanese woodcuts and his own childhood memories of summers in southern Italy. It has a softer, more hand-drawn feeling than some other Pixar offerings, almost as if it’s 2D in places, which gives the impression of timelessness.

Luca could take place this summer or a century ago. It’s a folk tale, or perhaps a fable. And just like those kinds of stories, there’s a buried wisdom within Luca that shifts a little depending on who’s looking at it, like the color of light refracting off a wave.

The story centers on Luca (voiced by Jacob Tremblay), a shy young sea monster who herds fish by day in a cove off the coast of the Italian Riviera. He lives with his mother Daniela (Maya Rudolph), father Lorenzo (Jim Gaffigan), and crotchety badass of a grandmother (Sandy Martin). Luca is a good kid. He watches over the fish, who are little bubbly airheads with the mannerisms of sheep, and stays away from the surface. According to his parents, it’s dangerous up there. Especially for sea monsters, who are not themselves dangerous to humans but are regarded as such and hunted with fearsome spears. Don’t go near the humans.

Yet, like the Little Mermaid before him, Luca is curious about what’s going on up above. And when he finds some random detritus scattered in his fishes’ grazing region — an alarm clock, a little picture, a wrench — he starts to daydream.

Two cartoon boys eating gelato.

One day, another young sea monster named Alberto (Jack Dylan Grazer) appears to retrieve some of the artifacts. He coaxes Luca up to land. Luca reluctantly follows, and discovers to his amazement that he’s more well-equipped to survive above water than he’d expected. Alberto and Luca are fast friends, bound together by their mutual love of Vespas and, eventually, a grand adventure they embark upon to a nearby village called Portorosso. They meet a girl named Giulia (Emma Berman), who lives with her fisherman father (Marco Barricelli) and her marshmallow-shaped cat named Machiavelli. She enlists their help in winning Portorosso’s annual race.

Luca and Alberto are constantly worried they’ll be found out as loathsome sea monsters, not “normal” boys. And so they’re always hiding their true identities.

In some ways, it’s the oldest plot in the book: Someone who is an outsider — a beast, a poor stepsister, a mermaid, a princess with a hidden power — must conceal their identity in order to avoid detection among “normal” people. The message is familiar, too, the oldest in the Disney canon: Don’t be afraid to be yourself, because nobody else can be you, and those who love you are the only ones who matter.

Luca ’s sun-drenched spin on the story locates it in a coming-of-age tale that’s also about overprotective parents (reminiscent of Finding Nemo ) and the importance of having a friend who can pull us out of our darkest moments. I thought a little of last year’s Wolfwalkers (a non-Disney film, and probably better for it), which resonates with some of the same themes.

Despite its many plot threads, Luca is not the most complex film, philosophically, that Pixar has served up, or its most well-thought-out. Characters develop without warning or much explanation, which could be irritating if you’re entranced by Luca ’s universe. Though it’s firmly rooted in an old-world Italian village, the evocation isn’t as luminous or all-encompassing as a film like Coco .

Two cartoon boys stand in a town square.

But Luca does make space for a prismatic variety of readings, a simple allegory with a few different applications. One it seems to allow, if not outright invite, is that it’s a little fable about quietly realizing a queer identity. Luca at first tells Alberto he’s a “good kid” and that “it’s bad up here.” A villain tells him that “everyone is afraid of you and disgusted by you.” Late in the film, we hear that he may never be accepted for who he is, but at least he’s learning to find people who will accept him anyway. (A quick reveal right at the end involving two elderly residents of Portorosso seems to underline the point.)

That’s not the only reading, probably because no matter who you are, you’ve probably lived through a time of feeling like the one on the outside who has to learn to blend in, to go undetected in order to save yourself. Being awkward, or artsy, or neurodivergent, or less well-off than your friends, or just not into whatever the in-crowd likes — that can feel dangerous and hazardous, especially to a child whose parents have warned them away from some other world. (There’s a special thanks in Luca ’s credits to the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding , an organization that fights religious prejudice, which gave me a whole new window into what the movie could be about.)

Does Luca follow those threads through to a meaningful ending? Not really. The film is more fairy tale than anything else; if a young viewer walks away with some affirmation of their feeling that they’re different, it won’t come with much guidance on how to cope with a society that still won’t accept them. Life rarely ties up so nicely. That’s always been a problem with Disney’s storytelling — easy answers and wishful thinking that could set up young audiences with expectations that the real world will never fulfill.

Still, what a work of art means to the audience depends on who’s looking at it. Luca has left all kinds of room for us each to walk around in its story. No matter how you read it, the film is a sparklingly rendered, inventive little comedy with nods to Italian films and Japanese art and a world that seems like it wandered out of a storybook and onto a screen. It’s a little summertime gift, a treasure from under the sea.

Luca premieres only on Disney+ on June 18.

Will you help keep Vox free for all?

At Vox, we believe that clarity is power, and that power shouldn’t only be available to those who can afford to pay. That’s why we keep our work free. Millions rely on Vox’s clear, high-quality journalism to understand the forces shaping today’s world. Support our mission and help keep Vox free for all by making a financial contribution to Vox today.

We accept credit card, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. You can also contribute via

luca movie information

Next Up In Culture

Sign up for the newsletter today, explained.

Understand the world with a daily explainer plus the most compelling stories of the day.

Thanks for signing up!

Check your inbox for a welcome email.

Oops. Something went wrong. Please enter a valid email and try again.

luca movie information

Can AI help us predict extreme weather?

An illustration of small overlapping squares of paper in the shape of a brain.

Your brain needs a really good lawyer

Two men and three women holding hands on a table implying a polyamory relationship or love triangle.

Romantic norms are in flux. No wonder everyone’s obsessed with polyamory.

luca movie information

Why car insurance rates are soaring

Tony Evers speaks at a lectern.

Wisconsin’s new legislative maps are a win for democracy

luca movie information

The US is ready to call for a ceasefire in Gaza. Does it matter?

Review: ‘Luca’ is Pixar, Italian style — and one of the studio’s loveliest movies in years

Luca (Jacob Tremblay) and Alberto (Jack Dylan Grazer) in a scene from the Pixar movie "Luca."

  • Show more sharing options
  • Copy Link URL Copied!

The Times is committed to reviewing theatrical film releases during the COVID-19 pandemic . Because moviegoing carries risks during this time, we remind readers to follow health and safety guidelines as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health officials .

The key theme of “Luca,” Pixar’s funny and enchanting new feature, is the acquisition of knowledge — and the realization of how liberating, if painful, that knowledge can be. The charming insight of this movie, directed by Enrico Casarosa from a script by Jesse Andrews and Mike Jones, is that nearly everyone has something to learn. Luca (Jacob Tremblay), a kid who finds himself in a strange new land, must master its mystifying rules and traditions to survive. He has an impetuous friend, Alberto (Jack Dylan Grazer), whose know-it-all swagger is something of a put-on: Like Luca, he’s lonely and adrift in a world that turns out to be bigger, scarier and more wondrous than either of them could have imagined.

For their part, the animators at Pixar have imagined that world with customary ingenuity and bright-hued splendor, which makes it something of a shame that most audiences will have to watch the movie on Disney+. (It’s playing an exclusive June 18-24 engagement at the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood.) The filmmakers’ most exquisite visual creation here is Portorosso, a fictional village on the Italian Riviera presumably not far from Genoa, Casarosa’s birth city, which inspired his 2011 Pixar short, “La Luna.” In the director’s hands, Portorosso plays host to a parade of well-worn but lovingly deployed cultural clichés. The townsfolk navigate the sloped, cobblestoned streets on bicycles and Vespas and enjoy a diet of gelato, pasta and seafood. And speaking of seafood: The fishermen who trawl the surrounding waters always do so with harpoons at the ready, lest they encounter one of the fearsome sea monsters rumored to dwell just offshore.

The movie confirms and debunks those rumors in the opening minutes, plunging beneath the surface and into a neighborhood of underwater dwellers whose webbed and scaly humanoid bodies might well seem fearsome at first glance. But within seconds of meeting Luca — whose natural curiosity spurs varying degrees of protectiveness from his worried mom (Maya Rudolph), absent-minded dad (Jim Gaffigan) and slyly antiauthorian grandma (Sandy Martin) — it’s clear that there’s nothing remotely monstrous about him or the mildly cloying, sometimes hilarious family sitcom he initially seems to be inhabiting.

Alberto and Luca explore a cave in the Pixar movie "Luca."

Fortunately, “Luca” enters brighter, bolder territory at precisely the moment Luca himself does. In a scene that brings to mind Pinocchio experiencing his first moments of sentience or Ariel testing out her new legs, Luca swims to the surface and discovers a world of wonderment, including the wonderment of his own body. Outside his aquatic habitat, his scales, fins and tail magically vanish and he takes on human form. Every sea creature like him possesses these adaptive powers of disguise, including his new buddy, Alberto, who’s been living above the surface for a while and gives Luca a crash course on ambulatory movement, direct sunlight and other dry-land phenomena.

That makes “Luca” a fish-out-of-water comedy in the most literal sense, governed in the classic Pixar tradition by whimsical yet rigorously observed ground rules. A splash of water will temporarily restore Luca and Alberto (or parts of them) to their underwater forms — a shapeshifting conceit that allows for a lot of deftly timed, seamlessly visualized slapstick mischief. Early on, at least, the two friends have little to fear as they run around a deserted isle, basking in the sunshine and dreaming of future adventures on the open road. Only when their curiosity gets the better of them do they muster the courage to sneak into Portorosso, risking exposure and even death at the hands of locals who are more sea-fearing than seafaring.

Various farcical complications ensue, some of them cutely contrived but all of them deftly worked out, and enacted by a winning array of supporting players. These include a gruff but hospitable fisherman, Massimo (Marco Barricelli), and his plucky young daughter, Giulia (Emma Berman), who persuades Luca and Alberto to join her team in the local triathlon. That contest, whose events include swimming, biking and (of course) pasta eating, provides “Luca” with a conventionally sturdy narrative structure and an eminently hissable villain named Ercole (Saverio Raimondo).

Ercole’s last name is Visconti, one of countless movie allusions the filmmakers have tucked into the margins of the frame, most of which — the town’s sly nod to Hayao Miyazaki’s “Porco Rosso” aside — will prove catnip for lovers of Italian cinema in particular. There’s a boat named Gelsomina , a likeness of Marcello Mastroianni and a whole subplot devoted to fetishizing the Vespa, burnishing a vehicular-cinematic legacy that already includes “Roman Holiday” and “La Dolce Vita.” And those are just the explicit, deliberate references. When the trailer for “Luca” dropped months ago, more than a few wondered if Pixar had made a stealth PG-rated riff on “Call Me by Your Name,” Luca (!) Guadagnino’s drama about the pleasures of first love and the lush Italian countryside.

Luca and Alberto visit a town on the Italian Riviera in the movie "Luca."

They have and they haven’t. Like most kid-centric studio animation, “Luca” has little time for romance and no room for sexuality. Luca and Alberto’s bond, though full of intense feeling and subject to darker undercurrents of jealousy and betrayal, is as platonic (if not quite as memorably cheeky) as the odd-couple pairings of Buzz and Woody, Marlin and Dory. And yet the specific implications of Luca and Alberto’s journey, which forces them to hide their true identities from a world that fears and condemns any kind of otherness, are as clear as water — too clear, really, even to be classified as subtext. “Luca” is about the thrill and the difficulty of living transparently — and the consolations that friendship, kindness and decency can provide against the forces of ignorance and violence.

Liberating oneself from those forces is a matter of individual and collective responsibility, and “Luca” is nuanced enough to understand that everyone shoulders that responsibility differently. Luca’s mom and dad, voiced by Rudolph and Gaffigan as lovably bumbling helicopter parents, must let go and loosen up, but their instinctive caution is hardly misplaced. Alberto’s stubborn devil-may-care attitude offers an admirable corrective, but that fearlessness is shown to mask a deeper sort of denial, an insularity that refuses to consider the full scope of the world’s possibilities. What makes Luca this story’s namesake hero is that he’s able to absorb the best of what his friends and family pour into him; though small and lean (and sometimes blue and green), he stands at the point where their best instincts and deepest desires converge.

By the same token, “Luca” the movie may look slight or modest compared with its more extravagant Pixar forebears; certainly it lacks the grand metaphysical ambitions of the Oscar-winning “Soul” (whose director, Pete Docter, is an executive producer here). But that may explain why it ultimately feels like the defter, more surefooted film, and one whose subtle depths and lingering emotions belie the diminished platform to which it’s essentially been relegated. “Luca” is big in all the ways that count; it’s the screens that got small.

Rated: PG, for rude humor, language, some thematic elements and brief violence Running time: 1 hour, 35 minutes Playing: Starts June 18, El Capitan, Hollywood; also on Disney+

More to Read

A woman leans over her desk toward her computer

Review: A bored office worker comes to romantic life in ‘Sometimes I Think About Dying’

Jan. 26, 2024

In Hayao Miyazaki's animated "The Boy and the Heron." the titular boy sits beside a strange bird-man: the titular heron.

Animation shifting away from the clean lines of CG in favor of messier, retro styles

Nov. 15, 2023

In the top frame, a dog and robot get a hot dog. In the bottom frame, a duck family gathers, wide-eyed, in Central Park.

Personal connections loom large in the animated ‘Migration’ and ‘Robot Dreams’

Dec. 15, 2023

Only good movies

Get the Indie Focus newsletter, Mark Olsen's weekly guide to the world of cinema.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

luca movie information

Justin Chang was a film critic for the Los Angeles Times from 2016 to 2024. He is the author of the book “FilmCraft: Editing” and serves as chair of the National Society of Film Critics and secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.

More From the Los Angeles Times

(L to R) Geraldine Viswanathan as "Marian", Margaret Qualley as "Jamie" and Beanie Feldstein as "Sukie" in director Ethan Coen's DRIVE-AWAY DOLLS, a Focus Features release. Credit: Wilson Webb / Working Title / Focus Features

Review: Made by a solo Coen brother, ‘Drive-Away Dolls’ is trashy fun and exceedingly disposable

Feb. 21, 2024

WESTWOOD, CA - AUGUST 12: Nissan GT-R NISMO sports cars are seen outside the Fox Westwood Village Theatre, promoting the new 'Gran Turismo' movie, based on the Sony PlayStation video game series on August 12, 2023 in Westwood, California. (Photo by AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)

Jason Reitman and a group of directors have bought Westwood’s iconic Village Theater

Hannah Gutierrez-Reed arrives at the First Judicial District Courthouse in Santa Fe, N.M., on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2024, for the start of her trial on charges of involuntary manslaughter and tampering with evidence.

Company Town

‘Rust’ movie shooting trial begins after bumpy road to prosecution

Chalamet and Butler face off in a climactic scene from "Dune: Part Two"

Review: ‘Dune: Part Two’ stirs its sands darkly, deepening a sci-fi masterpiece in our midst

Advertisement

Supported by

Critic’s Pick

‘Luca’ Review: Calamari by Your Name

Pixar takes a trip to the Italian coast in this breezy, charming sea-monster story.

  • Share full article

luca movie information

By A.O. Scott

A lot of movies can be described as fish-out-of-water stories, but few quite as literally as “Luca.” The title character, voiced by Jacob Tremblay, is an aquatic creature who lives with his family off the Mediterranean coast of Italy. The undersea equivalent of a shepherd, tending an amusing flock of sheeplike fish, Luca has a natural curiosity that is piqued by his mother’s warnings about the dangers that await on dry land.

Like many a Disney protagonist before him — Ariel, Nemo and Moana all come to mind — he defies parental authority in the name of adventure. (His mom and dad are voiced, in perfect sitcom disharmony, by Maya Rudolph and Jim Gaffigan.) According to the film’s fantastical version of marine biology, sea monsters turn human on terra firma, though their fins and gills re-emerge quickly on contact with water. Luca is a bit like a mermaid and a little like Pinocchio, a being with folkloric roots and a modern pop-culture-friendly personality.

On a rocky island near his home, he meets Alberto (Jack Dylan Grazer), a fellow changeling and a wild, parentless Huck Finn to Luca’s more cautious Tom Sawyer. After a season of idyllic, reckless antics, mostly spent building scooters out of scraps and wrecking them in the surf, the friends make their way to a nearby Ligurian fishing village, where more serious peril — and more complicated fun — awaits.

“Luca” was directed by Enrico Casarosa, whose warm, whimsical aesthetic also infused “La Luna” (2012), his Oscar-nominated short . Unlike some other recent Pixar features, this one aims to be charming rather than mind-blowing. Instead of philosophical and cinematic ambition, there is a diverting, somewhat familiar story about friendship, loyalty and competition set against a picturesque animated backdrop.

So not a masterpiece, in other words. But also not a pandering, obnoxious bit of throwaway family entertainment. The visual craft is lovely and subtle — the orange glow of Mediterranean sunsets; the narrow streets and craggy escarpments; the evocations of Italy and Italian movies. If you look closely, you’ll catch a glimpse of Marcello Mastroianni and Giulietta Masina. The friendship between Alberto and Luca, built around the fantasy of owning a Vespa and threatened by a desperate act of betrayal, carries a faint but detectable echo of “Shoeshine,” Vittorio De Sica’s neorealist fable about two Roman street urchins who dream of buying a horse.

That’s one of the saddest movies ever. “Luca” has a few notes of gentle melancholy, but it isn’t the kind of Pixar movie that will turn adult viewers into bawling, trembling wrecks. Luca and Alberto’s bond is complemented and complicated by Giulia (Emma Berman), a fellow misfit (though not a sea monster) who brings the boys home to her fisherman father (Marco Barricelli) and recruits them to become her teammates in the town’s annual triathlon. (The three legs of the contest are swimming, cycling and pasta eating. Viva l’Italia!)

Their nemesis is Ercole (Saverio Raimondo), a preening bully with two nasty sidekicks, who threatens Luca and Alberto with humiliation and, worse, exposure to the harpoons of the sea-monster-hating townsfolk. At the same time, Luca is increasingly drawn to Giulia and the human world she represents, which makes Alberto jealous.

But the movie is too busy with its many plots — and too enchanted by its summery, touristic mood — to linger over bad feelings or grim possibilities. It’s about the sometimes risky discovery of pleasure, and it’s a pleasure to discover.

Luca Rated PG. Harpoons and hurt feelings. Running time: 1 hour 35 minutes. Watch on Disney+ .

A.O. Scott is a critic at large and the co-chief film critic. He joined The Times in 2000 and has written for the Book Review and The New York Times Magazine. He is also the author of “Better Living Through Criticism.” More about A.O. Scott

Explore More in TV and Movies

Not sure what to watch next we can help..

Andrew Lincoln and Danai Gurira, the former stars of “The Walking Dead,” reprise their roles on “The Ones Who Live,”  a six-part spinoff mini-series. Will fans of the AMC zombie horror series follow?

When Kelvin Harrison Jr. and Aaron Pierre signed on to play Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, respectively, in the new National Geographic series “Genius: MLK/X,” the actors knew their imperative was to make their iconic characters as human as possible .

How did Kingsley Ben-Adir become Bob Marley for “Bob Marley: One Love”? Despite little outward resemblance, the actor worked for months to get the reggae luminary’s look, sound and movement right .

If you are overwhelmed by the endless options, don’t despair — we put together the best offerings   on Netflix , Max , Disney+ , Amazon Prime  and Hulu  to make choosing your next binge a little easier.

Sign up for our Watching newsletter  to get recommendations on the best films and TV shows to stream and watch, delivered to your inbox.

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

Luca, a film that’ll make for a soothing home watch this summer.

Luca review – Pixar’s charming, if flimsy, tale of sea monster BFFs

One of the studio’s more minor efforts is still a sunny, likable story of two boys finding out who they are while stuck between different worlds

T here’s a cotton candy lightness to Pixar’s ebullient summer confection Luca: a sunny, nimble little story that also threatens to blow away in the sea breeze, as charming as it is minor. It’s a story of friendship and acceptance and one that many excitedly speculated might be about something more groundbreaking but, finally unveiled, it’s mostly more of the same. Another reliably slick combination of the Pixar playbook elements we’ve come to know so well, it’s a gentle, calming whisper that grows faint once it’s over.

Like many of their originals, it’s structured around an inventive, how-did-they-think-of-that conceit: sea monsters do in fact exist but when they make it to land, they briefly become human. Rather like the mogwai from Gremlins, they need to stay dry or their true form will emerge, something that would put them in extreme danger in the Italian town of Portorosso, where sea monsters are both feared and hated. For Luca (voiced by Jacob Tremblay), the world above the sea has been explained to him as an impossibility, his mother stressing the evils it contains; much safer to stay underwater, herding fish and spending time with family. But safer equals duller and when he encounters braver new friend Alberto (voiced by Jack Dylan Grazer), he follows him up to the surface and into the town …

When the first trailer hit, it was assumed that, like its leads, Luca might also be hiding its true self, that it could actually be Disney’s first real queer animation, a major milestone for representation within a genre that’s only ever shown us extreme straightness (something that adds to the toxic belief that being gay is somehow R-rated and unsuitable for a broad family audience). The signs were there – an intense male connection, code-switching, a duality of worlds, struggling to be accepted for one’s true self, a Pride month release, the title which some saw as a nod to the director of the gay Italian summer romance Call Me by Your Name, fantastic hair. But director Enrico Casarosa recently shot down such rumours, calling it a film about friendship with sexuality not part of the equation. It’s hard not to watch the film without seeing something allegorical, though, its tale of misfits, straddling two worlds, figuring out who they are and how everyone sees them bearing a close similarity to many coming out narratives. There are of course many ways to view the film’s theme of otherness, whether it be through the lens of immigration or even race, the film fitting alongside other Pixar films that have tried to broach weightier topics with a light touch.

But it’s one of their lesser, frothier attempts in this regard, a sweet but rushed caper that commits a rather familiar Pixar sin: placing an interesting idea in the middle of a rather generic story. The canny sea monster out of water set-up, and the intriguingly knotty dynamic it provides us with, teases much to be explored but the pair are lumbered with a rote tournament narrative instead as they must train and compete in a triathlon so they can win money to buy a Vespa (cue many a montage).

The world of Luca and its thematic potential are just so much more compelling than what ultimately ties it all together, a similar problem hampered parts of Up and Inside Out and more notably and consistently, Brave, thrilling, eccentric ideas that haven’t quite found plots that match them. So the film works in charming bursts, as writers Jesse Andrews and Mike Jones explore the shifting nature of early friendship, of how extreme and all-consuming it can be but also fragile when taken out of its protected bubble and into the world.

It’s string-pulling Pixar formula but done with just about enough effectiveness to work (do their films ever truly fail?). It doesn’t have that emotional kicker of an ending we might expect and hope for, it’s far too slight to evoke an ugly cry, but it’s breezily watchable, low stakes stuff, handsomely animated (on dry land, in water less so) and, like Disney’s spring adventure Raya and the Last Dragon , refreshingly free of romantic diversion, prioritising friendship and self-discovery over getting the boy, girl or sea monster. Wisely shifted from a theatrical release and on to Disney+ (it will be released in cinemas in some territories where the platform isn’t available), it’ll make for a soothing home watch this summer, like a pleasant, balmy trip to the beach you’ll enjoy at the time but struggle to remember by the time the cold returns. While its queerness isn’t specifically mentioned, thematically it’ll still provide an encouraging message about accepting who you really are, a familiar Pixar lesson perhaps but one that always bears repeating to LGBTQ youths, and hopefully one that will arrive with force in the future without needing to hide what it really is.

Luca is available on Disney+ from 18 June

  • Walt Disney Company
  • Animation in film
  • Comedy films

Most viewed

Cast & Crew

Jacob Tremblay

Luca Paguro

Jack Dylan Grazer

Alberto Scorfano

Emma Berman

Giulia Marcovaldo

Maya Rudolph

Daniela Paguro

Giacomo Gianniotti

  • KIDS & FAMILY

Sweet fish-out-of-water story about friendship, adventure.

  • Average 7.3
  • Reviews 304

Information

© 2021 Disney Enterprises, Inc. / Pixar. All Rights Reserved

Accessibility

Copyright © 2024 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.

Internet Service Terms Apple TV & Privacy Cookie Policy Support

IMAGES

  1. Fun Facts About Luca: Interview with the Cast & Filmmakers

    luca movie information

  2. Movie Review: Luca

    luca movie information

  3. Disney/Pixar's "Luca" Character Posters Released

    luca movie information

  4. 'Luca' Movie Review: An Adventure Grounded in Friendship, Forgiveness

    luca movie information

  5. Luca Movie Review: A Heartwarming Story About Friendship & Discovery

    luca movie information

  6. Luca

    luca movie information

VIDEO

  1. The luca movie part 2

  2. Luca movie part three

COMMENTS

  1. Luca (2021 film)

    Luca is a 2021 American animated coming-of-age fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Pixar Animation Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

  2. Luca (2021)

    1,348 102 Play trailer 2:26 29 Videos 99+ Photos Animation Adventure Comedy On the Italian Riviera, an unlikely but strong friendship grows between a human being and a sea monster disguised as a human. Director Enrico Casarosa Writers Enrico Casarosa Jesse Andrews Simon Stephenson Stars Jacob Tremblay Jack Dylan Grazer Emma Berman

  3. Luca

    Luca Rating: PG Runtime: 1h 35min Release Date: June 18, 2021 Genre: Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides.

  4. Luca

    Movie Info. Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable ...

  5. Luca (2021)

    Summaries On the Italian Riviera, an unlikely but strong friendship grows between a human being and a sea monster disguised as a human. A young boy experiences an unforgettable seaside summer on the Italian Riviera filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides.

  6. Pixar Animation Studios

    Luca Paguro. Luca Paguro is a bright and inventive 13-year-old sea monster with endless curiosity—especially when it comes to the mysterious world above the sea. Although he's been warned his whole life that the human world is a dangerous place, he longs for something beyond his quiet farm life where he herds goatfish day after day.

  7. Disney and Pixar's Luca

    0:00 / 2:26 Disney and Pixar's Luca | Official Trailer | Disney+ Pixar 7.75M subscribers Subscribe Subscribed 242K 26M views 2 years ago #PixarLuca This summer, you're invited to Portorosso....

  8. Luca

    1h 35min. Release Date: June 17, 2021. Genre: Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy. Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides.

  9. Luca

    1h 35min. Genre: Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy. Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these ...

  10. Exploring Friendship, Acceptance, and Overcoming Fear in Pixar's Luca

    April 28, 2021 Camille Jefferson Disney News Contributor Pixar fans, there's another reason to look forward to summer: a brand-new animated movie Luca is set to premiere on June 18, exclusively on Disney+!

  11. Watch Luca

    Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides.

  12. The Animation and Effects Behind Pixar's Luca, Now Streaming

    Disney News Contributor We've been eagerly awaiting the release of Pixar's new animated film Luca, and it's finally here! Directed by Enrico Casarosa ("La Luna"), produced by Andrea Warren ("Lava," Cars 3 ), and starring Jacob Tremblay as Luca and Jack Dylan Grazer as Alberto, Luca is now streaming exclusively on Disney+ .

  13. Luca movie review & film summary (2021)

    Reviews Luca Robert Daniels June 18, 2021 Tweet Now streaming on: Powered by JustWatch Pixar's "Luca," an Italian-set animated fairy tale concerning two young sea monsters exploring an unknown human world, offers the studio's hallmark visual splendor, yet fails to venture outside of safe waters.

  14. Luca

    Two fishermen, Giacomo and Tommaso, are out at night trying to catch fish when a strange creature suddenly begins swiping things from their boat. Upon seeing it, they recognize it as a sea monster and try to catch it, but it escapes, much to their dismay. Luca Paguro is a sea monster who farms goatfish for his family in a hidden area of the ocean.

  15. 'Luca': Everything You Need to Know about the new Pixar Movie

    Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's Luca is a coming-of-age story about a boy and his newfound best friend experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with...

  16. Luca

    Luca shares these adventures with his newfound best friend, but all the fun is threatened by a deeply-held secret: they are sea monsters from another world just below the water's surface. Directed by Academy Award® nominee Enrico Casarosa ("La Luna") and produced by Andrea Warren ("Lava," "Cars 3"), "Luca" is now streaming ...

  17. Pixar's Luca Review

    Pixar's newest film Luca is set in the sunbaked Italian sea town of Portorosso, and in the nearby Mediterranean waters where a shy young sea monster, Luca, lives with his family. Fans of The...

  18. Luca is a Pixar fable about sea monsters, friendship, and pasta

    The story centers on Luca (voiced by Jacob Tremblay), a shy young sea monster who herds fish by day in a cove off the coast of the Italian Riviera. He lives with his mother Daniela (Maya Rudolph ...

  19. 'Luca' review: Funny and enchanting

    Movies Review: 'Luca' is Pixar, Italian style — and one of the studio's loveliest movies in years Luca (Jacob Tremblay) and Alberto (Jack Dylan Grazer) in a scene from the Pixar movie...

  20. 'Luca' Review: Calamari by Your Name

    According to the film's fantastical version of marine biology, sea monsters turn human on terra firma, though their fins and gills re-emerge quickly on contact with water. Luca is a bit like a ...

  21. Luca review

    Benjamin Lee. T here's a cotton candy lightness to Pixar's ebullient summer confection Luca: a sunny, nimble little story that also threatens to blow away in the sea breeze, as charming as it ...

  22. Luca

    Luca - Apple TV. Available on Apple TV, iTunes, Disney+. Set in a beautiful seaside town on the Italian Riviera, Disney and Pixar's original feature film "Luca" is a coming-of-age story about one young boy experiencing an unforgettable summer filled with gelato, pasta and endless scooter rides. Luca (voice of Jacob Tremblay) shares these ...