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This site lets you find the exact gun used in any movie, ever

Plenty of movies feature guns, and this website will let you know exactly which gun is in every scene.

Joe Allen

There are few things that modern movies love more than guns. They’re everywhere, and that’s largely true whether you’re watching an action movie  or an Oscar-baity drama. A gun ramps up the tension of basically any genre, so it’s no wonder that they’ve become a fixture of our big-screen entertainment.

The proliferation of guns in big movies has naturally led some to wonder what specific guns are used in which movies. Sometimes, in movies like  John Wick , a lot of emphasis is placed on precisely which weapons are being used by the movie’s many assassins. In other movies, though, you don’t get as much attention to detail about exactly which weapons the main characters are using to shoot one another.

Thankfully, there’s a helpful resource that shows you which firearms are being handled in every movie you can think of that features a gun. The Internet Movie Firearms Database is a repository of posts that focuses on the handguns that central characters use in a wide variety of popular movies.

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If, for example, you want details on all of the guns used in Fight Club , this site has a breakdown of every firearm used in the film, and that breakdown is accompanied by helpful pictures of the scenes when each weapon is used. The site, which is set up in a Wikipedia-style template, is fairly encyclopedic, and that knowledge extends past movies and into other art forms like TV shows and video games.

Of course, the site is limited to weapons that actually exist in the real world. If you look for the guns used in something like  Alien , you’ll see that while there’s a page on the film, the information about the firearms being used is much more general. It describes the flamethrower used in the film, for example, but because the film is set in the future, it doesn’t offer specifics on the brand, etc.

Because the site is so comprehensive, it can be difficult to know where to start when looking through all of the thousands of titles that have been assembled. Fortunately, the site does allow you to organize its entry not just by the title of the movie, but also by the type of weapon used in it, and by the actors who star in the project.

The site also has a discussion tab and a separate discord where regular users can communicate with one another. Like Wikipedia, the Internet Movie Firearms Database seems to be built out in large part with help from individual users who watch movies and track which weapons are being used in each scene. The result is a site for those that are curious about weaponry, or are already experienced lovers of both movies and guns and are looking for an outlet. While the site is pretty comprehensive, you may also notice some missing movies on there that you can add yourself. Thankfully, the site’s interface gives you the power to do just that, as long as you know your gun facts. To start making edits yourself, all you need to do is request an account .

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Although it's just one type of martial arts, Kung Fu has always commanded a uniquely powerful position in the imaginations of movie makers around the world. Dating all the way back to the 1920s, Kung Fu fighting movies have been an elemental aspect of filmmaking. You can see the way the fighting style has inspired filmmakers both in Asia and in other parts of the world, and eventually in Hollywood. The best Kung Fu movies use the best of what this fighting form has to offer to create uniquely thrilling action sequences that may still surprise, even decades after their original release. Even more crucially, they take the philosophical concept behind kung fu, which can apply to any skill that requires energy and patience to master.

Whether they were homegrown in Asia or heavily inspired by Kung Fu films of the best, these are the 10 best Kung Fu movies of all time that you can watch online.

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Deciding if you want to try CBD is a personal decision, and the reasons you might be interested in the product vary wildly from person to person. Some people want to use CBD to relieve pain, while others use it to destress or to feel more relaxed.

Whatever your reasons for wanting to dabble in CBD, you're likely curious about what it feels like to take it, whether you should try smoking CBD, or if taking it as an oil is the best option for you. What does CBD oil feel like? Like all legal drugs, your decision to take CBD is up to you, but this guide may prove helpful as you weigh your options.

There's a reason action movies are so popular. The best action movies can thrill you with a dazzling combination of car chases, fight scenes, and special effects. The best action movies can also, and this is important, be wonderfully dumb. Indeed, the plot of an action movie is typically fairly unimportant, as long as the set pieces that get you from sequence to sequence are compelling enough.

If you're looking for some great action, you don't need to look much further than these, which are some of the best action movies on Amazon Prime. Whether your goal is to find something gritty and realistic or something completely silly but joyous nonetheless, Prime has plenty of great movies to choose from.

About: Internet Movie Firearms Database

The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in films, television shows, video games, and anime. A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function (although unaffiliated) to the Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry. It includes articles relating to actors, and some characters, such as James Bond, listing the particular firearms they have been associated with in their movies. Integrated into the website is an image hosting section similar to Wikimedia Commons that includes firearm photos, manufacturer logos, screenshots and related art. The site has been cited in magazines such as the NRA's American Rifleman and True West Magazine and magazine format television shows such as Shooting USA on the Outdoor Chann

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Internet Movie Firearms Database

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The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in movies , television shows , video games , and anime . A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function to the (unaffiliated) Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry. It includes articles relating to actors , and even some famous characters , such as James Bond , listing the particular firearms they have been associated with in their movies. Integrated into the website is an image hosting section similar to Wikimedia Commons that includes firearm photos, manufacturer logos, screenshots and related art. [3] [ not in citation given ] The site has been cited in magazines such as the NRA's American Rifleman and True West Magazine and magazine format television shows such as Shooting USA on the Outdoor Channel .

  • 2.2 Television shows
  • 2.3 Video games
  • 3.1 Exclusions
  • 3.2 Exceptions
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

Launched in May 2007 [4] by "Bunni", The Internet Movie Firearm Database (IMFDb) was originally set up to help identify the use of firearms in Hollywood films . For the first few months of its existence, it listed only a dozen films including The Matrix , Platoon (film) and Pulp Fiction . As the site grew, so did its content. In June 2007, the site began to list television shows as well as films. [5] The site has since been expanded to include pages for video games and anime .

Today the data base has grown to list over 4,445 films, [6] over 1,000 television shows, [7] over 510 video games [8] and 236 Anime films and series. [9]

The site has been used as a reference source by the owners of several shooting ranges located in Las Vegas , Nevada. After hearing customers ask to rent certain types of firearms used in movies and video games, the owners of the range used IMFDb to research the weapons in question. [10]

Structure and content

The database is set up to help curious moviegoers find out what firearms are used in various films. The site features many images of actual weapons used in films. IMFDb is able to get these images because many of its largest contributors are weapons masters working in Hollywood. [11]

Movie articles on the site typically include a list of the firearms in chronological order of their appearance. As part of each entry there is a text description of the firearm. Text sections also describe its use and/or significance to the scene or movie if integral to the storyline and which characters used the firearm. The provenance of the firearm may also be described to include other movies that had similar firearms or this particular firearm. One example of this is the 1887 Winchester Lever Action Shotgun which was featured prominently in the 1991 movie Terminator 2: Judgment Day (as can be seen in the movie's poster) and then made an appearance in the 1999 movie Wild Wild West .

Following the text are one or more stills showing the firearm in action /and/or which characters used it. The photos will often show original forms of the firearm along with variant versions.

Television shows

Television show article are typically quite lengthy as the shows often had numerous episodes over several seasons such as Gunsmoke that ran for twenty years. These articles are generally organized in one of several ways. One is to list all of the firearms (alphabetically) used in the series and then credit in each description the episodes it appeared. Another is to list the firearms chronologically by episode or season if they appear in a consistent manner. Another is to group the firearms by type (i.e. pistols, rifles, sub-machine gun, etc.) then describe their story and character use and episode credits.

Video games

Video game articles are much like the ones for movies and television shows with regard to the information included. There is no consistent format as they appear to follow the conventions used in the movie as well as the television show articles. Firearm provenances provided are for other games in a single series such as the James bond themed 007 or Resident Evil game series.

Anime (Japanese animation) articles are formatted much like the other categories of articles, but present a unique circumstance in the identification of firearms used. Anime, unlike live action media, is drawn and as such may draw upon a variety of sources. Generally speaking any firearm, from any era, in any variant (actual or possible), with any accessory, capacity, or configuration is fair game for inclusion. This assumes that due sometimes to the crude or unrefined drawing style of the animators that identification of the firearms is possible.

Prohibitions

  • ↑ Lua error in package.lua at line 80: module 'strict' not found.
  • ↑ imfdb:Sterling SMG
  • ↑ imfdb: Star Wars

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This sturdy Austrian had supporting roles in the recent action movies “Skyfall” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” the TV western “Justified” and the military video game “Medal of Honor: Warfighter.”

The ubiquitous performer — actually a semiautomatic pistol — is the Glock-17. A kind of Kevin Bacon of firearms, the Glock-17 appears without ceremony in movies and TV shows year after year, largely because it’s also popular with the law enforcement officers being depicted.

There is one place, however, where the Glock-17 is treated like a star – along with the dainty Walther PPK/S handgun that is James Bond’s sidearm of choice, the long-barreled Winchester rifles the Prohibition agents tote on the 1920s-set HBO show “Boardwalk Empire” and the oversized Desert Eagle pistols used in the “Modern Warfare” and “Far Cry” series of video games. That’s the Internet Movie Firearms Database, a surprisingly thorough, fan-built catalog of weapons used in movies, TV shows, video games and anime, maintained by a freelance Web developer in Glendora.

PHOTOS: Guns in Movies

Relying on the same wisdom-of-the-crowd model as Wikipedia, Christopher Serrano, 29, and a stable of about 300 regular volunteers have meticulously cataloged the weapons, along with screen shots, in more than 11,500 articles, including entries on underwater firearms, missile launchers and flame throwers. The site is laid out in a simple, schematic style, with pictures, quotes and trivia. But it’s the searchable database — similar to the Amazon-owned Internet Movie Database (IMDB) — that has made IMFDB.org a resource for Hollywood prop masters, casual gun collectors and anyone looking to settle a bar bet about what kind of rifles Jamie Foxx is carrying in “Django Unchained” (a variant of a Sharps rifle and a Remington 1858 “Cattleman’s Carbine”).

Most visitors are drawn to the site after searching for information about the guns in a movie they just saw or a game they just played — lately “Skyfall” and the video game “Far Cry 3” are popular, according to Serrano.

Some stick around to discuss and debate the guns they see on screen — a user named Charon68, for instance, found James Bond carrying the small PPK anachronistic for a movie set in 2012, commenting, “As cool as the thing looks, the cartridge is woefully underpowered and would barely make a scratch with modern body armor.” Another user, Excalibur01 also weighed in:”I really wish we’d see other Walthers. Nothing wrong with ‘tradition’ but how about the newer P99 or the PPQ or the PPS?”

Pop culture and guns have been linked since the beginnings of cinema — the groundbreaking, 1903 western short “The Great Train Robbery” features multiple revolvers and rifles, all of them cataloged on IMFDB — and through the years entertainers have relied on guns to help them tell all manner of stories, from westerns and gangster films to war dramas and police procedurals. In video games, guns even have their own genre, the first-person shooter.

And though recent shootings have reignited a cacophonous national debate about violence in entertainment, the events have made little impact on IMFDB’s steady traffic of about 1.5 million visitors a month, about half of them from outside the U.S.

PHOTOS: Jason Statham’s tough guy hall of fame

“The firearms are a tool used in the telling of a story,” Serrano said. “It’s the modern version of a samurai sword. It’s part of the art. I don’t feel there’s a glorification of firearms.”

Serrano, a reserved computer wonk who studied political science at UC Santa Barbara, said he created IMFDB in 2007 out of fannish curiosity — he was looking for information about the variety of futuristic-looking weapons in “The Matrix” movies online and couldn’t find much. A gun owner himself, he said he spends three to four hours a day working on the website and is planning a redesign this year to make it easier for users to add content. The site has a modest amount of advertising — on a recent day it had ads for a gun-advocacy group, a company that makes military patches and a snorkeling trip to Catalina.

Over the years Serrano’s creation has acquired a professional audience among the small group of Hollywood prop masters — or “armorers” — who supply firearms to film sets. Gregg Bilson Jr., chief executive of Independent Studio Services, the Hollywood prop house that provided the vintage guns used in “Django Unchained” and “Lincoln,” met with Serrano last month at Shot Show, a firearms trade convention attended by more than 62,000 people in Las Vegas.

“I was a bit of a skeptic at first, but I was surprised to find out how accurate this site is,” Bilson said. “There is a gun culture, a group of gearheads you could say, who are very interested in this kind of stuff.”

Bilson learned of the site from one of his company’s armorers, Larry Zanoff, who discovered it while doing research for a movie. Now Zanoff occasionally weighs in on the site via one of its regular contributors to correct or clarify information about films he’s worked on.

For IMFBD’s movie-industry audience, the appeal of the site is not only the database of information it contains but the attention it brings to their otherwise mostly anonymous work.

“The prop department, which is what handles the weapons, is an integral part of any film, but we don’t get much attention,” said Zanoff. “This website seems to be a good outlet for that, since we’re not gonna get an Academy Award anytime soon.”

Some of the site’s users are more casual gun aficionados, such as Patrick Byrne Foster, 21, who co-owns West Coast Corvair in Gardena. “I’m one of those people who likes mechanical things,” Foster said. “I’m interested in older guns, the history behind them, the design behind them. And I do find it cool when a gun I’ve used is in a movie. Especially if it’s a period piece, it’s interesting to see if they use the gun right.”

A favorite scene of Foster’s is in the 2008 movie “Gran Torino,” when Clint Eastwood’s character, Walt Kowalski, wields his Korean War rifle — an M1 Garand of a type Foster also owns — against a neighborhood gang. In another scene, a Hmong boy whom Walt has befriended picks up the gun.

“It’s interesting to see Clint break up a fight with a service arm he used in a war,” Foster said. “Now there’s a war in his own home, and the gun’s in completely different hands for completely different reasons. That gun is a story on its own.”

Other regular visitors use guns in their professions, like Robert Daniels, 47, a security guard at a casino in Las Vegas who works part time at a gun store and occasionally contributes to the site’s write-ups. When it comes to entertainment, for Daniels, guns are a vital part of many of the stories he wants to see.

“From a guy standpoint, I don’t really want to go see a hearts-and-flowers movie,” Daniels said. “I want to go see an action movie. Would somebody really want to go see a ‘Bourne’ movie and not see Jeremy Renner or Matt Damon using a firearm? To see a ‘Rambo’ movie without him using a gun?”

Daniels said he takes umbrage when Hollywood actors decry guns on the one hand — as many did in a recent public service announcement for the group Mayors Against Illegal Guns — while continuing to use them for TV and movie roles.

“You get some of these actors, ‘Oh, you shouldn’t use guns, blah blah blah,’ and they’ve got 20 movies where they’ve used firearms,” Daniels said. “It’s hypocritical. You can’t talk about firearms and not talk about politics, but they’re going about it the wrong way. People try to demonize the guns. How can an inanimate object be good or evil?”

[email protected]

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Angel is released from prison and is reunited with his friend Rich who helps him smuggle weapons in a gun-running ring. But Detroit police and the FBI have declared war on arms smuggling. Angel is released from prison and is reunited with his friend Rich who helps him smuggle weapons in a gun-running ring. But Detroit police and the FBI have declared war on arms smuggling. Angel is released from prison and is reunited with his friend Rich who helps him smuggle weapons in a gun-running ring. But Detroit police and the FBI have declared war on arms smuggling.

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Famous Guns in Movies — Cinema s Most Creative Movie Guns Featured

Famous Guns in Movies — Cinema’s Most Creative Movie Guns

F ew props are as inherently cinematic as firearms. For decades, creative filmmakers have been pushing past the bounds of reality to craft truly inventive and unique movie guns. Whether in the action, thriller, or sci-fi genres, there are many examples of writers and directors injecting an added dose of creativity into their shootouts by inventing fictional firearms. Join us in counting down the most creative guns in movies.

Famous guns in movies

15. puppet guns - shoot ‘em up (2007).

Shoot ‘Em Up  •  G uns on strings

Shoot ‘Em Up is chock full of creative shootouts. This action sequence finds our protagonist trapped in a gun warehouse and, as usual, severely outnumbered. To turn the tide of battle, he makes use of numerous guns he has attached to strings and planted throughout the building, puppeteering them to deadly effect. It’s a creative use of movie firearms and one that fits perfectly well with the over-the-top tone of the film.

In its essence it's nothing but a violent live action Bugs Bunny cartoon and I dug it.

Full review - Felix Vasquez, Cinema Crazed

Guns used in movies

14. golden gun - the man with the golden gun (1974).

Scaramanga assembles and uses his eponymous golden gun

The James Bond series is full of cool weaponry, but only one gun was so cool that it made its way into the title of a film. The Man With the Golden Gun isn’t one of the  best Bond films , it isn’t even the best Roger Moore Bond outing, but it does have a great villain turn from Christopher Lee. And the golden gun itself became one of the most iconic props from the entire franchise.

Roger Moore's Bond has got a rough deal over the year, but whilst this takes itself a little too lightly it has a lot going for it.

Full Review - Ian Freer, Empire Magazine

13. Motorcycle Minigun -  Machete (2013)

Machete rides a motorcycle through the air in front of a massive explosion

In a movie jam-packed with crazy, over-the-top action sequences, the motorcycle minigun still manages to stand out as a big, fist-pump moment. The cool factor is through the roof. The only downside is that Danny Trejo’s titular Machete character doesn’t use it more.

This gleefully excessive pastiche of an exploitation picture delivers everything promised by its own faux trailer.

Full Review - Nigel Floyd

12. Noisy Cricket - Men in Black (1997)

Examining the physics of the Noisy Cricket

The Noisy Cricket might not look like much but it is an extremely powerful little handgun. The small size makes the gun unassuming, but packed inside the tiny casing is quite likely the most powerful weapon in the entire MIB arsenal. Destructive and humorously contradictory, a perfect combo for a sci-fi, action, comedy film.

[Director Barry Sonnenfeld] establishes the premise in the wildly entertaining first 45 minutes and then glides along for the rest of the film on the strength of a poker-faced comic sensibility.

Full Review - Michael Ollove, Baltimore Sun

11. Holy Shotgun - Constantine (2005)

Assembling the holy shotgun

Constantine , far from being a perfect film, has some really strong elements working for it in spite of any shortcomings. Perhaps the strongest aspects of Constantine are the production design and level of general inventiveness. The holy shotgun is a sight to behold and it gets plenty of usage from Keanu Reeves’ titular character.

Constantine deserves a cult following and should be remembered for all the things it did right instead of its perceived wrongs.

Full Review - Drew Dietsch

10. Gun Leg - Planet Terror (2007)

Cherry puts her machine-gun leg to use

Planet Terror is the second Robert Rodriguez film to make our list, and not the last either. Rodriguez has a keen sense for badass, creative weaponry. Planet Terror was the first feature film in the Grindhouse double-feature presentation, with the second half being written and directed by Quentin Tarantino . Be sure to check out our ranking of the best Tarantino movies.

The film has a wonderfully fun style and the machine-gun leg is the perfect encapsulation of this movie’s goofy sensibilities.

Gloopy and outrageous, this schlock horror tribute is pure trash... in the best possible sense.

Full Review - Jamie Russell, BBC

9. Pulse Rifle - Aliens (1986)

How the pulse rifle was created

James Cameron’s Aliens was a fantastic follow-up to Ridley Scott’s original sci-fi horror masterpiece. Cameron traded some of the horror for a stronger emphasis on action, and with more action came new sci-fi weaponry. The M56 Smart Gun deserves some love too, but it is the classic colonial marine pulse rifle that gets the spot on our list.

The design is iconic, and the sound design for the gunfire is creative and highly memorable. If you are a fan of the original, you can likely learn a lot by reading the Alien screenplay.

Scene to scene, encounter to encounter, its tension builds unrelentingly. So, fasten your seat belts. It`s a blast.

Full Review - Rick Kogan, Chicago Tribune

8. Guitar-Case Guns - Desperado (1995)

Guitar case guns in action

The middle film in Robert Rodriguez’s “ Mexico ” trilogy is undoubtedly the strongest. It’s a full-throttle, guns-blazing action film with a great sense of style. The previous film in the Mexico trilogy gave viewers a guitar case full of guns. Desperado takes it one step further and delivers guitar cases that were literally guns themselves. A pair of machine-gun guitar cases and a rocket-launcher guitar case form a trio of cool movie weapons.

Like an R-rated, violent Roadrunner cartoon.

Full Review - Nell Minow, Common Sense Media

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7. Deadly Codpiece - From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)

Don’t mess with Tom Savini

One last creative Robert Rodriguez weapon to round out the list. The codpiece revolver worn by Tom Savini, who dubbed it the crotch rocket, is a funny sight gag and a deadly last-resort for self-defense against vampire strippers.

This codpiece also appears in Robert Rodriguez’s earlier film, Desperado , but it doesn’t get used in that film, disappointingly. 

Luckily, From Dusk Till Dawn came along a couple of years later and put the prop to good use. Quentin Tarantino stars in and wrote From Dusk Till Dawn , meaning there is plenty of great Tarantino dialogue .

Still sizzles like a capsaicin-spiked grindhouse meatloaf baked and served just under the wire of its sell-by date.

Full review - Nick Rogers, The Film Yap

6. Gristle Gun - eXistenZ (1999)

Birth of the gristle gun

The gristle gun is a wholly unique cinematic weapon. From David Cronenberg , the master of body horror , comes a body horror firearm, and not the only one on this list either. The gristle gun makes use of Cronenberg’s penchant for stomach-churning special effects. This gun is comprised entirely of biological components and is inventive and grotesque in equal measure.

Dark, delirious fun.

Full Review - Geoff Andrew, Time Out

5. Auto 9 - RoboCop (1987)

RoboCop puts the Auto9 to use

When the futuristic Detroit police department set about creating the ultimate law-enforcement hybrid of man and machine, they, of course, had to develop a highly-effective, personalized pistol for RoboCop as well. The Auto 9 is an automatic handgun that can deal with creeps with ultimate efficiency. It even has a nifty storage slot built right into RoboCop’s metallic thigh.

A sardonic but perfectly-realised depiction of a mayhem-fuelled near future.

Full Review - Clark Collis, Empire Magazine

4. Sleeve Guns - Equilibrium (2002)

Christian Bale busts out the gun kata

Produced and released as a direct answer to The Matrix , the reception to Equilibrium has swung back and forth over the years. A new form of pseudo-martial-arts was devised for the film. It was dubbed “gun kata” and fused hand-to-hand combat with firearm usage.

One sci-fi advancement that makes the practice of gun kata possible are the high-tech sleeves that can reload your guns for you. If you are a fan, you might be interested in reading the  screenplay for the Matrix .

famous guns in movies

Violent post-nuclear sci-fi is Orwellian.

3. Flesh Gun - Videodrome (1983)

The handgun fuses with James Woods

With Videodrome , David Cronenberg makes his second appearance on our list, this time with an even more horrific and sickening body horror handgun. The special effects for this gun-hand hybrid are astonishing and the visual is unforgettable. The flesh gun plays a pivotal role in the plot as well, it is not just for shock value. 

Videodrome is bursting with creativity at every level, and the flesh gun is a great example of Cronenberg’s brilliance. Videodrome made it onto our list of the  best horror movies ever made . Find out what else made the cut.

guns in movies

It's hard to overstate how premonitory David Cronenberg's masterpiece turned out to be.

Full Review - Sean Fennessey, The Ringer

Guns in movies

2. lawgiver mk. ii - dredd (2012).

Judge on judge violence

2012’s Dredd , an alternate take on the Judge Dredd source material, was an underrated sci-fi, action flick. The Lawgiver Mk. II is the signature weapon of the judges, and it is a real beast. This high-tech handgun has a number of alternate fire modes and ammunition types, all of which get used throughout the film in the various shootouts. Fully automatic, armor-piercing, stun, incendiary, and more, it even contains a built-in miniature rocket launcher.

I may have never seen a non-horror film as relentlessly, brutally, and crowd-pleasingly violent as this skintight adaptation of the long-running British comic-book character.

Full Review - Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle

1. ZF1 - The Fifth Element (1997)

A demonstration of the ZF1

Within The Fifth Element , the ZF1 is a brand-new creation and is being pitched as the ultimate weapon to end all weapons. It is easy to see why. This thing has every conceivable option you would possibly want in a sci-fi gun: bullets, poisonous arrows, a net launcher, a rocket launcher, a flame thrower, and even a freeze-blaster.

It is truly the Swiss army knife of movie guns. The ZF1 has it all.

The Fifth Element has enough eye-appeal for two good movies.

Full Review - Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune

The Best Action Movies of All Time

Those were the most creative movie guns to ever grace the silver screen. If all of this talk of firearms got you in the mood for some exciting shootouts, then you’ll be sure to enjoy our list of the best action movies ever made. You might even see some of these inventive guns put to use.

Up Next: Best Action Movies →

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  1. Gun (2010)

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  2. TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: Movie guns

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  3. 30 of the Most Iconic Movie Guns

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  4. Gun (2010)

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  5. Top 10 Most Famous Movie Guns [Updated]

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COMMENTS

  1. Internet Movie Firearms Database

    Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games Join our Discord! If you have been locked out of your account you can request a password reset here . Main Page Welcome to imfdb, the Internet Movie Firearms Database 30,205 articles. Movies Guns Video Games Television Anime Actors Rules, Standards and Principles

  2. Internet Movie Firearms Database

    The Internet Movie Firearms Database ( IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in films, television shows, video games, and anime. A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function (although unaffiliated) to the Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry.

  3. IMFDB:About

    The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDB) is a website that allows users to find which guns were featured in certain movies, television series, video games, and anime, as well as contribute to the site in a wiki format.

  4. Internet Movie Firearms Database

    Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games If you have been locked out of your account you can request a password reset here . Main Page Welcome to imfdb, the Internet Movie Firearms Database 30,198 articles. Movies Guns Video Games Television Anime Actors Rules, Standards and Principles

  5. Category:Revolver

    1 Revolvers 2 Revolving Rifles and Carbines 3 Revolving Shotguns 4 Revolving Launchers 5 Blank-Firing Revolvers Revolvers Revolvers Adams Revolver Alfa 2330 Alfa 820 Alfa 840 Alfa Flobert Revolver Allen & Thurber Pepperbox Apache Pepperbox Revolver Arminius HW Revolver Series Arminius Model 10 Astra 357 Astra 680 Astra 960 Astra Terminator

  6. Category:Shotgun

    1 Pump-Action 2 Automatic 3 Break-Action 4 Other Pump-Action PUMP-ACTION SHOTGUNS Akkar Karatay Tactical Armscor M30 (Many Variants) Atis R.G. 700 Baikal IZh-81 (Many Variants) Baikal MP-133 Benelli M3 Super 90 Benelli Nova Benelli Supernova Tactical Beretta LTLX7000 Beretta M3P Beretta Model RS-200 Beretta Model RS-202 M2 Boito Pump Browning BPS

  7. Tracker (2024)

    From Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games. Jump to navigation Jump to search. This show is currently airing. This article or section is for a series that is Ongoing, or currently on the air and thus is a continuous work in progress.

  8. This site lets you find the exact gun used in any movie, ever

    10 Sec Thankfully, there's a helpful resource that shows you which firearms are being handled in every movie you can think of that features a gun. The Internet Movie Firearms Database is a...

  9. Category:Rifle

    1 Rifles 1.1 Muzzleloaders 1.2 Breechloaders 1.3 Lever action 1.4 Pump action 1.5 Bolt action 1.6 Semi-auto 1.7 Miscellaneous Rifles This section shows the rifles that are not listed under the particular categories of Assault Rifles, Carbines, Battle Rifles, Sniper Rifles or Anti-Tank Rifles.

  10. The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDB) Needs our Help

    IMFDB.org is a searchable repository of firearms facts that centers on the who, what, when, where and why of movies, television and video games. Based on the film industry's own Internet library...

  11. 'Internet Movie Firearms Database' that thoroughly covers the firearms

    The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDB) , a database of guns that appeared in fiction works, is easy to use because it is made on the same MediaWiki as Wikipedia, and has appeared in various ...

  12. About: Internet Movie Firearms Database

    The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in films, television shows, video games, and anime. A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function (although unaffiliated) to the Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry. It includes articles relating to actors, and some characters, such as James Bond, listing the ...

  13. Know your movie guns with the Internet Movie Firearms Database

    Know your movie guns with the Internet Movie Firearms Database By Paul Tassi May 20th 2010, 2:50pm "I grew up in a tough neighborhood, and we used to say that you can get further with a kind...

  14. Internet Movie Firearms Database

    The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in movies, television shows, video games, and anime.A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function to the (unaffiliated) Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry. It includes articles relating to actors, and even some famous characters, such as James Bond, listing the ...

  15. Database catalogs movie firearms

    Database catalogs movie firearms 1 / 1 Inspector Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood) wants to know if you've kept count of how many shots he's fired from his Smith & Wesson Model 29 -- six, or only...

  16. 30 of the Most Iconic Movie Guns

    The IMDb list includes guns from movies made through the end of 2016. There are only 33 entries but 34 guns because two different ones appear in the same movie. Some of these weapons are in...

  17. Guns of Hollywood: Which Firearms Made Their Mark?

    1. Franchi SPAS-12 "Clever girl." The Franchi SPAS-12 is easily one of the most recognizable firearms in the movie and video game world, and it's an odd choice. In real life, the SPAS-12 utilized a cool design that allowed it to swap between semi-auto and pump-action…but it wasn't a great shotgun. Franchi Spas 12 (Photo: Tekogi via WikiCommons)

  18. Gun (2010)

    Gun: Directed by Jessy Terrero. With 50 Cent, Val Kilmer, AnnaLynne McCord, James Remar. Angel is released from prison and is reunited with his friend Rich who helps him smuggle weapons in a gun-running ring. But Detroit police and the FBI have declared war on arms smuggling.

  19. Top 10 Most Famous Movie Guns [Updated]

    The M-60! Presented in no real order… Most Famous Movie Guns 1. Heckler & Koch MP5 One of the classic '80s action movie guns, from its release in 1966 the MP5 was quickly the hottest thing for tactical units the world over. Die Hard From Vietnam to the war in Iraq, the MP5 hasn't gone out of style in over 50 years of service.

  20. Internet Movie Firearms Database

    Internet Movie Firearms Database - Guns in Movies, TV and Video Games If you have been locked out of your account you can request a password reset here . Main Page Welcome to imfdb, the Internet Movie Firearms Database 30,200 articles. Movies Guns Video Games Television Anime Actors Rules, Standards and Principles

  21. Famous Guns in Movies

    15. Puppet Guns - Shoot 'Em Up (2007) Shoot 'Em Up • G uns on strings Shoot 'Em Up is chock full of creative shootouts. This action sequence finds our protagonist trapped in a gun warehouse and, as usual, severely outnumbered.