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ratings of new james bond movie

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No Time to Die

2021, Action/Adventure, 2h 43m

What to know

Critics Consensus

It isn't the sleekest or most daring 007 adventure, but No Time to Die concludes Daniel Craig's franchise tenure in satisfying style. Read critic reviews

Audience Says

It's very long and packed with plot, but No Time to Die says goodbye to Daniel Craig's Bond with all the action and excitement franchise fans expect. Read audience reviews

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Where to watch no time to die.

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No time to die videos, no time to die   photos.

In No Time To Die, Bond has left active service and is enjoying a tranquil life in Jamaica. His peace is short-lived when his old friend Felix Leiter from the CIA turns up asking for help. The mission to rescue a kidnapped scientist turns out to be far more treacherous than expected, leading Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain armed with dangerous new technology.

Rating: PG-13 (Sequences of Violence & Action|Brief Strong Language|Some Disturbing Images|Some Suggestive Material)

Genre: Action, Adventure, Mystery & thriller

Original Language: English

Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga

Producer: Michael G. Wilson , Barbara Broccoli

Writer: Neal Purvis , Robert Wade , Cary Joji Fukunaga , Phoebe Waller-Bridge , Scott Z. Burns

Release Date (Theaters): Oct 8, 2021  wide

Release Date (Streaming): Nov 9, 2021

Box Office (Gross USA): $160.8M

Runtime: 2h 43m

Distributor: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Production Co: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Eon Productions Ltd.

Sound Mix: Dolby Digital, Dolby Atmos

Aspect Ratio: Scope (2.35:1)

View the collection: James Bond 007

Cast & Crew

Daniel Craig

Lyutsifer Safin

Léa Seydoux

Madeleine Swann

Lashana Lynch

Ben Whishaw

Naomie Harris

Eve Moneypenny

Jeffrey Wright

Felix Leiter

Christoph Waltz

Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Ralph Fiennes

Rory Kinnear

David Dencik

Valdo Obruchev

Ana de Armas

Billy Magnussen

Dali Benssalah

Cary Joji Fukunaga

Neal Purvis

Screenwriter

Robert Wade

Phoebe Waller-Bridge

Michael G. Wilson

Barbara Broccoli

Chris Brigham

Executive Producer

Linus Sandgren

Cinematographer

Elliot Graham

Film Editor

Hans Zimmer

Original Music

Mark Tildesley

Production Design

Neal Callow

Art Director

Véronique Melery

Set Decoration

Suttirat Anne Larlarb

Costume Designer

Debbie McWilliams

Scott Z. Burns

News & Interviews for No Time to Die

Awards Leaderboard: Top Movies of 2021

Where to Watch the 2022 Oscar Nominees

Oscar Nominations 2022: Full List of Nominated Films, Actors, Directors, and Filmmakers

Critic Reviews for No Time to Die

Audience reviews for no time to die.

A bold and beautiful and ending to the Daniel Craig era and one of the best Bond entries I've seen. While the villain is good, he's not exactly the strongest, but where the films strengths lie are in its heroes. Bond and crew are better than ever here. The new 007 is good, Q is great, M is good, everyone is at their best to make this a great ending to the Craig era of films and a full circle film that wraps up everything that this era has done. That said, you may be at your best if you've watched all this films in rapid succession, as there are a lot of callbacks. If you have though, it's a lot of fun, and great for people who have been through the Craig era all the way. It makes a lot of bold choices, and for me anyway they all pay off in an emotional way in a great action spy thriller.

ratings of new james bond movie

One cannot talk about No Time to Die without talking about finality. I'll try and dance around significant spoilers but the movie by design is meant to serve as the capper to the Daniel Craig era filling out the world's favorite martini-drinking British secret agent. I thought that 2015's Spectre was the swan song for Craig as it brought back a famous franchise villain Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) made the man Bond's secret half-brother, and it tried to explain how every bad thing that seemed to befall Bond was the machinations of an evil conspiracy, and then it literally ends with Bond driving into the sunset in his classic car with his girl (Lea Seydoux) by his side. It felt like the end, and it felt very much like everyone was just done and tired. And then the Bond producers wanted one more shot, or more likely one more lucrative franchise entry, to send an even older, battle-tested Craig on his way. I was wary of another Spectre-like entry, one that was tying back to the elements of decades-old for empty homage. Does anyone really care that the villain is meant to be Blofeld who means next to nothing to audiences in this era? After watching all 160 minutes of the longest Bond on record, for an actor who has portrayed 007 for 15 years, I have to say that No Time to Die is a terrific action movie and a welcomed second chance at a sendoff for the modern era of Bond that has gone through great artistic rebirth. Bond's cozy retirement is short-lived. Spectre agents have found him and Madeleine (Seydoux) and now Bond is forced to ship off his love for her safety. Years later, Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek) is determined to take down the last vestiges of the Spectre organization, the same group responsible for murdering his family. Bond is recruited by the newest 007 agent, Nomi (Lashana Lynch), to help MI-6 locate a kidnapped scientist with a powerful nanobot poison that can be genetically targeted to a specific person. Bond agrees especially once he realizes that Safn and his dangerous organization are targeting Madeleine, who has a big surprise of her own. As an action movie, I will argue that No Time to Die is better than 2012's Skyfall, the Bond film that is widely seen as the high point of Craig's tenure but one I find overrated. Director and co-screenwriter Cary Fukunaga, the second director ever given a writing credit for a Bond film, has crafted a beautiful movie with a real sense on how to showcase the majesty and suspense. Nothing will likely rival the superb cinematography by the legendary Roger Deakins on Skyfall, but this movie gets as close as you can get. It's a remarkably beautiful looking movie. I mean that not just in the exotic locales and scenic vistas but simply in its depiction of action. The visual arrangements are noticeably several levels higher in quality, elegantly composed and lit to make each scene so pleasing to the eyes even before the information of the scene translates. Fukunaga (True Detective) frames the action in clear shots and clean edits so the audience is oriented with every shot and each patient edit point. For an era that began by trying to adopt the Paul Greengrass-style of docu-drama edits popularized with the Bourne sequels, it's quite a welcomed change. I appreciate that action directors have creatively gone more in a direction of longer takes, wider shots, and a conscious effort to showcase the ingenuity and skills of its action choreography. Let us enjoy watching the masters of action operate at their highest level. Fukunaga understands this, and while the action might not be the best in the series, it is lovingly orchestrated and displayed. There is a delightful mid-movie set piece that deserves its own attention mainly because of how actress Ana de Armas (Knives Out, Blade Runner 2049) steals the show. She plays Paloma, a CIA agent working in coordination with Bond, and the two of them wreak havoc across a Cuban neighborhood while wearing their finest evening wear. She immediately leaves a favorable impression and struts her stuff while operating heavy machinery with confidence. This part feels the most aided by co-screenwriter Phoebe Waller-Bridge's contributions. Craig personally requested that Waller-Bridge, best known for award-winning TV like Fleabag and the first season of Killing Eve, come aboard and help polish the script, including characterization and dialogue. This sequence feels the most in keeping with her past spy thriller work and penchant for strong female characters who are meant to take the lead. de Armas is so memorable, and her segment so self-contained, that it feels like a backdoor spinoff to set up her own character's franchise, and one that I wouldn't hesitate to watch. If you thought Spectre was getting convoluted with how it tried to bend over backwards to explain how one man and one villainous conspiracy were manipulating all of Bond's many miseries and setbacks, well then things are going to get even worse for you to keep up with. I'll credit returning screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, who have been with the storied franchise even before Craig's 2006 debut, with attempting to make the continuity matter for a franchise that often throws up its hands at continued emotional stakes. By stretching backwards with ret-cons and added flashbacks, every new Bond movie tries to better evaluate the previous ones including the poorer movies, like Spectre and 2008's Quantum of Solace. It's like saying, "Hey, you didn't like those bad guys in that movie? Well, these are the real bad guys," or, "Well, maybe you didn't like them, but their heinous actions gave rise to these new bad guys." However, a consequence of continuing to add further and further clandestine machinations, and spiraling consequence from those machinations, is that Bond has now become a tangled web that is more convoluted without offering much in the way of payoff. I don't think much more is gained introducing a new villain saying, "It was me all along," when we don't have an established relationship or interest with these new villains. Imagine introducing the Emperor back in Episode 9 of Star Wars and saying he was secretly behind everything… oh wait. There are also benefits to this approach and No Time to Die crafts a sendoff unlike any other final entry for a Bond actor. This is a franchise going back sixty years, but the 007 brand has endured because no one actor is bigger than the brand. The franchise is regularly resetting with each new addition. The hyperbolic bombast and tongue-in-cheek frivolity of the Pierce Brosnan years (1995-2002) was replaced with a more grounded, gritty, and psychologically wounded Bond, made even more so by giving him personal attachments and then taking them away. I would argue this decade-plus with Craig (2006-2021) has involved the most mature and personal movies of the franchise;s history. It's fitting then for the final film to pay service to that elevated take on the character. If you're treating the secret spy as more of a person than a suit and a gun and a wisecrack, then that character deserves an ending that stays true to prioritizing more human elements of the character. To that end, No Time to Die works as a final sendoff, and I feel pretty confidant saying Craig is officially done now. After a year and a half of delays from COVID, as well as its parent company, MGM, being bought for billions by Amazon, we finally have the final Bond movie in Daniel Craig's successful run, and it's a worthy finale for an era of the franchise becoming relevant again. I don't know if that many people are emotionally attached to the character, likely more so just the nostalgia and the franchise, but if ever you were going to tear up from a James Bond thriller, this would be the one. It's an exceptionally strong visual caper, with smooth and steady direction from Fukunaga, and while overly long and convoluted and a dull villain, it comes together for a worthy and celebratory conclusion that stands with the best of Bond. I'll still cite 2006's Casino Royale as the best Craig Bond, and one of the best ever, but No Time to Die is a solid second-place entry, and it does what few other Bonds ever could: fitting finality. Until, naturally, the popular series inevitably reboots with the next handsome leading man sipping a signature vodka martini (shaken, not stirred). Nate's Grade: B+

A neatly packaged and entertaining exit for Daniel Craig's Bond that ties closely with 2015's Spectre. The movie has the usual hallmarks of espionage, gadgets and fancy cars but they all feel like uninspired ingredients that are expected of the franchise at this point. Thematically there's a lot of concise narrative choices that reinforce ideas of "legacy" and how one wants to be remembered for their "time". Often it feels all the effort almost excessive but at least it drives the point home. A lot of focus is made crafting Bond's personal and romantic narrative for emotional resonance but this makes the "big bad" antagonist feel somewhat like an afterthought, with much of his backstory and development coming from exposition. All intentions to make him come off as a parallel or antithesis to Bond feels forced, if not for Rami Malek's intense on screen presence he would've been rather forgettable. The supporting cast is quite fun with their own entertaining quirks. The greenhorn CIA agent, (Ana de Armas who feels oddly wasted to only have one act in the film) the new contentious 007's (Lashana Lynch) rivalry with Bond, Q being Q etc. No Time to Die finishes Craig's run beautifully, despite a relatively dull espionage plot Bond's personal narratives are fittingly what matters most as the end credits roll and they do wrap up quite nicely.

The James Bond franchise wasn't something I got into until Casino Royale hit theatres back in 2006. It was after that film that I decided to go back and give the entire franchise a watch. For me, there is an equal number of good and bad Bond films. I've never loved this franchise for that exact reason, but have always appreciated its legacy. Daniel Craig and Sean Connery are definitely my two favourite portrayals of the character, but I do believe that with Casino Royale, Skyfall, and now No Time to Die, Craig was a part of more good Bond films than any other actor. Here's why I believe No Time to Die is a very fitting final film for Daniel Craig. Unlike the rest of the franchise, the Daniel Craig films are all connected to each other, and therefore No Time to Die picks up after the events of Spectre, which have large ramifications here. More than any others, I would say Casino Royale and Spectre are the most referenced throughout the course of this movie. Now retired and wishing to retire, isolated, James Bond is brought back into the field one last time when the organization known as Spectre is brought back into the forefront. Now headed by mastermind Safin (Rami Malek), his mission is to hunt him down to end this organization. With the addition of other subplots and dealing with the fact that the 007 moniker is now in use by someone else, it makes it difficult for Bond to have an easy way out.  The character of Safin is only in the film for a handful of scenes, but Rami Malek made them quite memorable for me. I was actually okay with the fact that the main villain had so little screen time because I didn't see that as the main point of the film. Léa Seydoux as Madeleine makes her return here as well and her storyline with Bond is really what made this film work for me as much as it did. This is the most different James Bond film in a very long time, in that it doesn't focus heavily on the villain storyline, but more of an aged Bond who just wants out of the game. Even though the notion of retirement has been in other Bond films, this one actually ran with it and I enjoyed that quite a lot.  My only complaint with this film is that there is quite a lot of fan service and there are times where it may be too much for certain viewers. I loved almost every moment of it though, even if there are one or two moments that really had me rolling my eyes. Other than a few moments that feel slightly forced in comparison with the rest of the movie, they ended up being very minor issues to me. All in all, this Bond film tries to cover all the bases that a classic James Bond film would have and I believe that it immensely worked well.  In the end, No Time to Die isn't going to be remembered for being the greatest James Bond film of all time or anything like that, but certain things that happen throughout the course of this film will absolutely be talked about for years to come. Daniel Craig is giving it his all here once again and returning characters also have more than a moment or two to shine. With some stellar Cinematography by Linus Sandgren and some very solid direction by Cary Joji Fukunaga, the look and feel of this film feels grand, even for this franchise. I have nothing but praise considering how much I enjoyed myself with this one, but I will say that a much more satisfying experience will come if you have seen the previous four Bond films. Now pleaying in theatres, absolutely check this one out.

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'No Time to Die' isn't perfect, but it's a solid swan song for Daniel Craig, critics say

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  • The 25th Bond film isn't perfect, but explosive stunt sequences and a magnetic performance from Daniel Craig are enough to overcome a complicated plot and and long run time, critics say.

"No Time to Die" currently holds an 83% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes from 138 reviews.

  • "No Time to Die" debuts in the U.K. on Friday before opening domestically Oct. 8.

After 18 months of waiting, the latest installment in the James Bond saga is finally arriving the in theaters.

A swan song for actor Daniel Craig, who has portrayed 007 since 2006's "Casino Royale," "No Time to Die" debuts in the U.K. on Friday before opening domestically Oct. 8.

The 25th Bond film isn't perfect, but explosive stunt sequences and a magnetic performance from Craig are enough to overcome a complicated plot and long run time, critics say.

Years after apprehending Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz), the main antagonist of 2015's "Spectre," James Bond has retired and is living a quiet life in Jamaica. When an old CIA agent contact asks for help with one last job, Bond finds himself confronting the sinister Safin (Rami Malek) as well as the woman he once loved Madeleine Swann (Lea Seydoux).

Here's what critics thought of Craig's final James Bond film ahead of its U.K. opening:

A.O. Scott, The New York Times

It's clear throughout "No Time to Die" that the film's producers and writers were keenly aware that this was Craig's final turn as the iconic 007.

A.O. Scott of The New York Times said the film "is uncommonly preoccupied with memory and leave-taking," in his review of the film.

"Mortality looms over the quips and car chases — not only the expected slaughter of anonymous minions, but an inky cloud of grief, loss and weariness," he wrote.

Bond refers to himself as "an old wreck" and Craig, 53, plays the part of a man who's survived battle, but has not been left unscathed.

"[Director Cary] Fukunaga has a crisp, stylish way with action, and some of the set pieces have the flair and inventiveness of musical numbers, most notably a party in Havana where Ana de Armas shows up to play Cyd Charisse to Craig's Gene Kelly," Scott said. "That sequence feels like a throwback and an update, reprising the Bond tradition of elegance, charm and high silliness."

Read the full review from The New York Times.

Nicholas Barber, BBC

"No Time to Die" feels long, but "it packs in so much that you can hardly complain," wrote Nicholas Barber in his review of the film for the BBC.

The film clocks in at two hours and 43 minutes, the longest of any James Bond flick to date.

"It piles on the grief and raises the emotional stakes, with the help of Hans Zimmer's operatic music and Linus Sandgren's warm cinematography," said Barber. "But it also keeps the jokes and the silliness coming: it's been decades since Bond had this many groan-worthy one-liners, and he's never had this many Oliver Hardy-style exasperated glances."

Barber said the latest James Bond film "does exactly what it was intended to do," give Craig a proper send-off.

"Beyond that, it somehow succeeds in taking something from every single other Bond film, and sticking them all together," he said.

Read the full review from the BBC.

John Nugent, Empire

John Nugent, a writer for Empire, also praised Fukunaga's directing in his review of "No Time to Die."

"Fukunaga, it seems, was an ideal choice of director, skillfully balancing the contradictions of the character and the franchise, and while he doesn't quite escape the usual pitfalls — a middle third bogged down by plotting and exposition doesn't justify that heaving runtime — he has always been an intuitive filmmaker, deeply interested in the humanity of his characters," Nugent wrote.

He compared Fukunaga's action sequences to that of John Wick, noting the emphasis on sharp and savage gunfights and intense chases.

"This is a Bond film that dutifully ticks all the boxes — but brilliantly, often doesn't feel like a Bond film at all," Nugent wrote. "For a 007 who strived to bring humanity to larger-than-life hero, it's a fitting end to the Craig era."

Read the full review from Empire.

Brian Tallerico, Roger Ebert

For Brian Tallerico of RogerEbert.com, "No Time to Die" director Fukunaga "plays it too safe and too familiar."

"Even as it's closing character arcs that started years ago, it feels like a film with too little at stake, a movie produced by a machine that was fed the previous 24 flicks and programmed to spit out a greatest hits package," he wrote in his review of the film.

Tallerico was particularly critical of how the film used its supporting cast, noting that returning actors like Ralph Fiennes, Naomie Harris and Ben Whishaw are given little to do except "push the plot forward to its inevitable ending."

Lashana Lynch, a new addition to the film as Bond's 007 replacement, "feels like a self-aware nod to controversy around the casting of Bond, which is cool enough, but then she's not given much of a character to make her interesting on her own," he said.

And Ana de Armas, who appears as a fellow spy during a mission to Cuba, "pops up to give the film a completely different and welcome new energy in an action sequence set in Cuba, only to leave the movie ten minutes later."

Read the full review from RogerEbert.com.

Jason Solomons, The Wrap

"'No Time to Die' will be remembered for its emotional impact above all," wrote Jason Solomons in his review of the film for The Wrap. "And, to cap it all, Craig may well have delivered the most complex and layered Bond performance of them all."

Many critics have agreed that Craig's performance is one of the most emotional of any previous James Bond actor. Since "Casino Royale," the character of Bond has been given more depth than any other portrayal of the iconic character.

"Suffice to say, then, that 'No Time To Die' is Daniel Craig's best incarnation of an iconic role, an iteration that sees Bond travel to emotional spaces the character has never been to before, at least not since 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service' or in certain passages of Ian Fleming's books," Solomons wrote.

"You feel all the wear and tear on Craig's body and face, all the strain on Bond of having to save the world one last time (again) yet also all the tantalizing freedom of someone approaching the end of a long run," he said.

Read the full review from The Wrap. Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal and CNBC. Universal is releasing "No Time To Die" internationally while MGM handles the domestic release. Rotten Tomatoes is owned by NBCUniversal.

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Movie Reviews

Tv/streaming, collections, great movies, chaz's journal, contributors, no time to die.

ratings of new james bond movie

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After months of delays, the 25 th official James Bond film is finally here in “No Time to Die,” an epic (163 minutes!) action film that presents 007 with one of his toughest missions: End the era that most people agree gave new life to one of the most iconic film characters of all time. Everyone knows that this is Daniel Craig ’s last film as Bond, and so “No Time to Die” needs to entertain on its own terms, provide a sense of finality for this chapter of the character, and even hint at the future of the spy with a license to kill. It would also help a bit to clean up some of the mess left by “ Spectre ,” a film widely considered a disappointment. All of the boxes that need to be checked seem to drag down “No Time to Die,” which comes to life in fits and starts, usually through some robust direction of quick action beats from director Cary Joji Fukunaga , but ultimately plays it too safe and too familiar from first frame to last. Even as it’s closing character arcs that started years ago, it feels like a film with too little at stake, a movie produced by a machine that was fed the previous 24 flicks and programmed to spit out a greatest hits package.

Long gone are the days when a new Bond movie felt like it restarted the character and his universe as a standalone action film. “No Time to Die” seems cut more from the Marvel Cinematic Universe model of pulling from previous entries to create the impression that everything that happens here was planned all along. You don’t really have to have seen the previous four films, but it will be almost impossible to appreciate this one if you haven’t (especially “Spectre,” to which this is a very direct sequel).

And so, of course, we start with Vesper, the love of Bond’s life from “Casino Royale.” After a very clever and taut opening flashback scene for Madeleine Swann ( Léa Seydoux ), the film catches up with James and Madeleine in Italy, where he’s finally been convinced to go see the grave of the woman who continues to haunt him. It explodes. Is this a hint that the creators of “No Time to Die” are going to blow up their foundation and give Bond new definition? Not really, although the extended chase/shoot-out sequence that follows is one of the film’s best. (It totally had me pre-credits.)

Bond blames Swann for what happened in Italy, convinced she betrayed him, and it leads to a repeat of the “ Skyfall ” arc with James off the grid five years after the prologue. The deadly theft of a weaponized virus that can target a specific person’s DNA brings Bond back to the fold, although he’s first aligned with the CIA via Felix Leiter (a wonderfully laid-back Jeffrey Wright ) and a new face named Logan Ash ( Billy Magnussen ). He’s been replaced at MI6 by a new 007 named Nomi ( Lashana Lynch ) and James doesn’t really trust M ( Ralph Fiennes ). He’s convinced M knows more about the new threat than he’s letting on (of course, he does), but at least Bond’s still got Q ( Ben Whishaw ) and Moneypenny ( Naomie Harris ) helping him behind the scenes.

It’s definitely a crowded crew of espionage experts from around the world, but these talented supporting performers are given surprisingly little to do other than push the plot forward to its inevitable ending. Lynch feels like a self-aware nod to controversy around the casting of Bond, which is cool enough, but then she’s not given much of a character to make her interesting on her own. Seydoux and Craig have shockingly little chemistry, which was a problem in the final act of “Spectre” that's deadlier here because of what’s missing from the final act, and a character is added into their dynamic in a way that feels cheap and manipulative. Ana de Armas pops up to give the film a completely different and welcome new energy in an action sequence set in Cuba, only to leave the movie ten minutes later. (I truly felt the MCU-ness here in that I expect her to reappear in Bond 26 or 27.)

As for villains, Christoph Waltz returns as the slow-talking Blofeld, but his big scene doesn’t have the tension it needs, ending with a shrug. And then there’s Rami Malek as the superbly named villain Lyutsifer Safin, another heavily-accented, scarred, monologuing Bond baddie who wants to watch the world burn. The polite thing to say is that Malek and the filmmakers purposefully lean into a legacy of Bond bad guys, but Safin is such a clear echo of other villains it’s as if the next Avengers movie had another big purple guy named Chanos. Craig's Bond deserved a better final foe, one who’s not really even introduced into the narrative here until halfway through.

What keeps “No Time to Die” watchable (outside of a typically committed turn from Craig) is the robust visual sense that Fukunaga often creates when he doesn’t have to focus on plot. The opening sequence is tightly framed and almost poetic—even just the first shot of a hooded figure coming over a snowy hill has a grace that Bond often lacks. The shoot-out in Cuba moves like a dance scene with Craig and de Armas finding each other’s rhythms. There’s a riveting encounter in a foggy forest and a single shot climb in a tower of enemies that recalls that one-shot bravura take from “True Detective.” In an era with fewer blockbusters, these quick visceral thrills may be enough.

When “Casino Royale” burst on the scene in 2006, it really changed the action landscape. The Bond mythology had grown stale—it was your father or even your grandfather’s franchise—and Daniel Craig gave it adrenaline. For something that once felt like it so deftly balanced the old of a timeless character with a new, richer style, perhaps the biggest knock against “No Time to Die” is that there’s nothing here that hasn’t been done better in one of the other Craig movies. That’s fine if you’re such a fan of Bond that reheated leftovers still taste delicious—and even more so after waiting so long for this particular meal—but it’s not something anyone will remember in a few years as films like “Casino Royale” and “Skyfall” define the era. Maybe it all should have ended a couple movies ago. Then we all would have had time for something new. 

Only in theaters on October 8th .

Brian Tallerico

Brian Tallerico

Brian Tallerico is the Managing Editor of RogerEbert.com, and also covers television, film, Blu-ray, and video games. He is also a writer for Vulture, The Playlist, The New York Times, and GQ, and the President of the Chicago Film Critics Association.

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Film Credits

No Time to Die movie poster

No Time to Die (2021)

Rated PG-13 for sequences of violence and action, some disturbing images, brief strong language and some suggestive material.

163 minutes

Daniel Craig as James Bond

Léa Seydoux as Dr. Madeleine Swann

Lashana Lynch as Nomi

Ralph Fiennes as M / Gareth Mallory

Christoph Waltz as Ernst Stavro Blofeld

Ben Whishaw as Q

Naomie Harris as Eve Moneypenny

Rami Malek as Lyutsifer Safin

Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter

Ana de Armas as Paloma

Billy Magnussen as Logan Ash

Rory Kinnear as Bill Tanner

David Dencik as Valdo Obruchev

  • Cary Joji Fukunaga

Writer (characters)

  • Ian Fleming

Writer (story)

  • Neal Purvis
  • Robert Wade
  • Phoebe Waller-Bridge

Cinematographer

  • Linus Sandgren
  • Elliot Graham
  • Hans Zimmer

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Daniel craig outshines 'no time to die' in his final turn as james bond.

Justin Chang

ratings of new james bond movie

Bond (Daniel Craig) teams up with secret agent Paloma (Ana de Armas) in Havana in No Time to Die. Nicola Dove /Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios hide caption

Bond (Daniel Craig) teams up with secret agent Paloma (Ana de Armas) in Havana in No Time to Die.

It's been more than a year since No Time to Die was supposed to open in theaters, and while the pandemic is far from over, the movie's long-overdue release feels like a good omen for an industry that could use it .

Never mind if James Bond can save the world — can he save the movies in the era of COVID and streaming-service domination? I have no idea. I can only say that it's a poignant pleasure to see Daniel Craig as Bond on the big screen one last time, even if the movie around him is seldom as good as he is.

Daniel Craig is the bookend Bond, giving 007's story a beginning — and an end

Daniel Craig is the bookend Bond, giving 007's story a beginning — and an end

But then that's always been the case with the Craig Bond movies, with the sole exception of Casino Royale , the first and still the best of the five. Craig put his imprint on the character from the get-go: Like any good 007, he showed he could rock a tuxedo and toss off double-entendres with ease.

Bond With A Broken Heart: Defending Daniel Craig

Bond With A Broken Heart: Defending Daniel Craig

But he was also a colder, broodier James Bond — closer to Sean Connery than Roger Moore , but with an aching vulnerability all his own. With this Bond, it was personal: We saw just how anguished he could be when he lost the love of his life, Vesper Lynd, a tragedy that haunted him over the next few movies and continues to haunt him in this one.

As No Time to Die begins, Bond has been retired from active MI6 duty for some time and started a new life with Madeleine Swann, played by Léa Seydoux. But he can't shake the memory of Vesper, and before long tragedy tears Bond and Madeleine apart, setting a somber tone that's beautifully captured by Billie Eilish 's opening theme song.

New 007 Release Delayed For 3rd Time As Pandemic Continues To Batter Film Industry

Coronavirus Updates

New 007 release delayed for 3rd time as pandemic continues to batter film industry.

Five years later, Bond is bumming around Jamaica when a fresh criminal conspiracy convinces him to end his retirement. The plot is too busy and complicated to summarize at length: Let's just say it involves a deadly plague of DNA-targeting nanobots that could wipe out millions of people worldwide, which feels just close enough to our real-life pandemic to suggest why the studio might have opted to hold the picture back a year.

That said, nothing about No Time to Die feels especially timely or urgent. It's the usual assembly of Bond movie clichés, which is nothing to complain about, of course, since clichés — the gadgets, the one-liners, the martinis, the sex — are the lifeblood of this series.

Bond Gadgets Stand Test Of Time (But Not Physics)

Movie Interviews

Bond gadgets stand test of time (but not physics).

But more than once during No Time to Die , I found myself wondering if those familiar beats couldn't have been hit with a bit more panache. Did it really take four screenwriters — including the great Phoebe Waller-Bridge , the comic genius behind Fleabag — to come up with a script this workmanlike? And between Christoph Waltz as returning villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld and Rami Malek as new villain Lyutsifer Safin, did the movie really need two scheming megalomaniacs, both of whom have facial disfigurements to conveniently signal how evil they are?

Back at MI6, Lashana Lynch plays a highly competent new spy who's been assigned Bond's 007 code number. But their professional rivalry never really takes off. The movie is on more solid footing with Bond's old colleagues: Ralph Fiennes ' M, Naomie Harris ' Moneypenny and Ben Whishaw's Q are as delightful company as ever. And a terrific if under-used Ana de Armas nearly steals the picture as an agent who teams up with Bond during a mission in Havana. It's a witty, suspenseful sequence, with enough flirtatious fun and outlandish stuntwork to recapture some of that escapist Bond-movie pleasure.

Picking The Best Bond: Connery And Craig Rise To The Top

James Bond At 50

Picking the best bond: connery and craig rise to the top.

For the most part, that pleasure returns only fitfully over the movie's two-hour-and-43-minute running time. The director, Cary Joji Fukunaga , whose credits include the African war drama Beasts of No Nation and the first season of True Detective , is a skilled filmmaker with a snazzy way with action. But this is a twilight Bond movie, and the mood is overwhelmingly somber. There are continual reminders of Bond's advancing age, of his past regrets and losses. The final showdown feels less like a climax than a benediction.

Craig has been a terrific James Bond, maybe even the best, and his departure certainly deserves a little fanfare. But I admired the impulse behind this very long goodbye without feeling as moved as I wanted to be. There's something a little too strained and self-conscious about the tragic emotional arc the filmmakers have saddled Bond with over the past several movies, and it feels like more than the character can withstand. Will Bond ever be allowed to be Bond again, a dashing rogue leaping deftly from caper to caper? Not this time — but maybe the next.

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‘This gigantic piece of ridiculously watchable entertainment which feels like half its actual running time’ … Daniel Craig in No Time to Die.

No Time to Die review – Daniel Craig dispatches James Bond with panache, rage – and cuddles

The long-awaited 25th outing for Ian Fleming’s superspy is a weird and self-aware epic with audacious surprises up its sleeve

T he standard bearer of British soft power is back, in a film yanked from cinemas back in the time of the toilet roll shortage, based on a literary character conceived when sugar and meat rationing was still in force, and now released as Britons are fighting for petrol on the forecourts.

Bond, like Norma Desmond, is once again ready for his closeup – and Daniel Craig once again shows us his handsome-Shrek face and the lovable bat ears, flecked with the scars of yesterday’s punch-up, the lips as ever pursed in determination or disgust.

Lashana Lynch and Lea Seydoux in No Time to Die.

And Craig’s final film as the diva of British intelligence is an epic barnstormer, with the script from Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Phoebe Waller-Bridge delivering pathos, drama, camp comedy (Bond will call M “darling” in moments of tetchiness), heartbreak, macabre horror, and outrageously silly old-fashioned action in a movie which calls to mind the world of Dr No on his island.

Director Cary Fukunaga delivers it with terrific panache, and the film also shows us a romantic Bond, a uxorious Bond, a Bond who is unafraid of showing his feelings, like the old softie he’s turned out to be.

A queasy and dreamlike prelude hints at a terrible formative trauma in the childhood of Dr Madeleine Swann (a gorgeously reserved Léa Seydoux), that enigmatic figure we saw in the last movie who is now enjoying a romantic getaway with James. But a shocking act of violence destroys their idyll, as we knew it must, and Bond has some spectacular stunts as he hurls himself from a bridge.

It all has a lot to do with a sinister biowarfare plan called “Heracles” being developed by M (Ralph Fiennes) using a renegade scientist Obruchev (David Dencik) – but both creepy boffin and weapon are stolen in a sequence of preposterous action comedy, incidentally involving a sullen, bickering functionary played in cameo by Hugh Dennis.

Both MI6 and the CIA want Obruchev back – but British intelligence does not care to involve Bond who is now in retirement in Jamaica, perhaps in tribute to Ian Fleming’s holiday retreat, and M has handed over his 007 status to a new agent Nomi, stylishly played by Lashana Lynch.

‘Another in the endless gallery of antagonists who have conceived a personal obsession with Bond himself’ … Rami Malek.

But the Americans, in the form of his old buddy Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright) and an uptight new state department appointee Logan Ash (Billy Magnussen) persuade Bond to take on the job as a freelance, and send him to Cuba, where he liaises with an untrained operative: Paloma – a witty and unworldly turn from Ana de Armas whose rapport with Craig recalls their chemistry in Knives Out . The Cuban nightclub scene has something genuinely bizarre about it, bringing us a henchman with a surreal glass eye.

The awful truth is that M has allowed “Heracles” to be compromised by the creepy Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) who is being kept by the Brits in Lecter-ish imprisonment, but has managed to direct this new plan from his hi-tech cell, but who is now himself under attack by the new ubervillain in town – Safin, played with pouting disdain by Rami Malek, another in the endless gallery of antagonists who have conceived a personal obsession with Bond himself.

James Bond: royal premiere for Daniel Craig's final film in the franchise No Time To Die – video

It is of course a festival of absurdity and complication, a headspinning world of giant plot mechanisms moving like a Ptolemaic universe of menace. Perhaps nothing in it measures up to the drama of Bond’s rage-filled hurt feelings at the very beginning. But it is very enjoyable and gleefully spectacular – Craig and Seydoux and Malek sell it very hard and you can see the pleasure everyone takes in this gigantic piece of ridiculously watchable entertainment which feels like half its actual running time.

And the big finish shows that the 007 franchise-template is still capable of springing a surprise on the fanbase – and it could be that the world of Bond has taken something from the Marvel and DC universes, with their own sense of cartoonish grandeur and mystery. No Time To Die is startling, exotically self-aware, funny and confident, and perhaps most of all it is big: big action, big laughs, big stunts and however digitally it may have been contrived, and however wildly far-fetched, No Time To Die looks like it is taking place in the real world, a huge wide open space that we’re all longing for.

  • No Time To Die
  • Ian Fleming
  • Daniel Craig
  • Cary Fukunaga
  • Ben Whishaw

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‘No Time to Die’: What the Critics Are Saying

After a star-studded premiere in London, this much-delayed Bond film is drawing mostly positive early reviews.

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ratings of new james bond movie

By Stephanie Goodman

The latest James Bond adventure, “No Time to Die,” was supposed to hit theaters in April 2020. The pandemic hit instead, and the film’s release was postponed more than once. But on Tuesday the 25th installment in the franchise had a splashy world premiere in London .

On hand were 007 himself, Daniel Craig ; his co-stars Léa Seydoux (as Madeleine Swann, the love interest), Ana de Armas, Lashana Lynch and Rami Malek; the filmmaker Cary Joji Fukunaga, the first American to direct a Bond film; and Billie Eilish, who wrote the title song. Also in attendance were Prince William with Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge; and Prince Charles with Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall; along with the film’s producers, Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson.

Just as important, critics finally got a look at the movie, which will reach multiplexes on Oct. 8. Here is a roundup of what they’re saying:

A Callback to Dr. No: “Craig’s final film as the diva of British intelligence is an epic barnstormer, with the script from Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, with Phoebe Waller-Bridge delivering pathos, action, drama, camp comedy (Bond will call M ‘darling’ in moments of tetchiness), heartbreak, macabre horror, and outrageously silly old-fashioned action in a movie which calls to mind the world of Dr. No on his island. Director Cary Fukunaga delivers it with terrific panache, and the film also shows us a romantic Bond, an uxorious Bond, a Bond who is unafraid of showing his feelings, like the old softie he’s turned out to be.” — Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Unafraid of Risks: Craig “invests the role with more emotion, power and style in a movie that not only marks a milestone as the 25th time around but also one not afraid to take some twists, turns and, yes, risks in a long-delayed entertainment that sees James Bond not only out to save the world from evil forces again but perhaps, in these Covid times, the theatrical exhibition business itself.” — Pete Hammond, Deadline.com

Too Much Time to Die: “In terms of Bond staples, the movie does deliver some impressive chases and action sequences, with Ana de Armas (Craig’s ‘ Knives Out ’ co-star) adding another dose of female empowerment during a mission that takes Bond to Cuba. Still, ‘ No Time to Die ’ feels as if it’s working too hard to provide Craig a send-off worthy of all the hype associated with it — an excess that might be summed up as simply, finally, by taking too much time to reach the finish.” — Brian Lowry, CNN

An Improvement Over “Spectre”: Fukunaga “gives the film a visceral immediacy that’s quite different from the previous outings — and script contributions from Phoebe Waller-Bridge have certainly beefed up the female characters, with Craig’s ‘Knives Out’ co-star Ana de Armas brilliant as a newly qualified C.I.A. agent he encounters in Cuba and Seydoux ’s character given the sort of complex arc and no-nonsense attitude that was sorely lacking in ‘Spectre.’” — Alistair Harkness, The Scotsman

The Key Is Craig: “More traditional 007 fans may wish for the action to move forward with more pace — at 163 minutes, this is the longest Bond in the canon — and each set-piece has certain hermetic quality, like a stand-alone episode, such as that pre-credit sequence in Matera, or the visit to Cuba in which Ana de Armas shines as agent Paloma. What holds it all together is Craig, given some longer speeches and passages of performance the like of which I can’t recall a Bond previously delivering.” — Jason Solomons, The Wrap

A More Emotional Bond: “Craig’s maturity shows in his emotions. He’s still confident and aggressive, but erratic and quick to anger. He’s never been more vulnerable — nor, really, has the character — than he is here. He’s also accompanied by three very different Bond girls: Alongside Madeleine, who becomes a therapist, there’s MI6 agent Nomi, Lashana Lynch, and Ana de Armas as a C.I.A. agent who’s ‘had three weeks training.’ All three are terrific and bring out varied shades in brooding Craig.” — Johnny Oleksinski, The New York Post

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Aaron Taylor-Johnson as Bond

Everything we know about ‘Bond 26’ so far

Will Aaron Taylor-Johnson be the next 007?

Phil de Semlyen

It’s that time again. One James Bond has handed in his Walter PPK, licence to kill and loyalty card at the MI6 staff caf é , and the process of replacing him is underway

It’s out with Daniel Craig and in with… well, who? That’s the question that will be preoccupying EON producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G Wilson over the coming months. 

When will the next James Bond be announced?

With Bond 26 not expected on our cinema screens until 2025 at the earliest, the film remains firmly in the pre-pre-production phase. ‘We’re working out where to go with him, we’re talking that through,’ said Barbara Broccoli in June 2022 . ‘There isn’t a script and we can’t come up with one until we decide how we’re going to approach the next film because, really, it’s a reinvention of Bond. We’re reinventing who he is and that takes time. I’d say that filming is at least two years away.’ Co-producer Michael G Wilson has also stressed that Bond 26 will be a hard reset for the franchise and for Bond himself. Don’t expect any youngsters in the running was the gist of his comments in 2022. ‘We’ve tried looking at younger people in the past,’ he told Deadline . ‘But trying to visualise it doesn’t work. Remember, Bond’s already a veteran. He’s had some experience. He’s a person who has been through the wars, so to speak. He’s probably been in the SAS or something. He isn’t some kid out of high school that you can bring in and start off. That’s why it works for a thirtysomething.’

At some point in the not-too-distance future, white smoke will come billowing out of EON’s metaphorical chimney and the identity of the new 007 will be revealed. Until that time comes, there’s a tonne of fun to be had in speculating who will commit near-on a decade to playing MI6’s finest.  

So, who might be 007 after Daniel Craig?

1. aaron taylor-johnson .

Age : 32 Odds : 2/1

Emerging from nowhere (and Nowhere Boy ) to lead the field is Taylor-Johnson, who is said to have had a ‘hugely impressive’ recent meeting with Barbara Broccoli. If you believe the bookmakers, he’s now the hot favourite to play Bond. His current odds – 2/1 – are low enough to make Le Chiffre’s eyes water. 

The British actor, who recently starred opposite Brad Pitt as a gun-toting hitman in action-thriller Bullet Train , has broody charisma and a balletic physicality – as well as serious action chops, showcased in films from Nocturnal Animals to Anna Karenina . He’s also got an in with REM in case anyone fancies opening Bond 26 with some moody Americana.

‘Aaron Taylor-Johnson is the latest star to see his name at the head of the betting after a flurry of interest from punters over the last two days,’ notes Alex Apati of UK bookmakers Ladbrokes.

2. Henry Cavill 

Age : 39 Odds : 5/2

Hot on his heels is the ex-Man of Steel, Henry Cavill. The Londoner’s recent conscious uncoupling from Superman and the DC universe – and to lesser extent, his departure from Netflix’s smash hit series The Witcher – suddenly leaves space on his schedule for the kind of heavy-lifting (and publicity duties) demanded by playing Ian Fleming’s legendary spy. 

Sure enough, bookies have Cavill at 5/2 second favourite to put those reloadable arms into service for King and Country. 

BRIDGERTON (L to R) REG�-JEAN PAGE as SIMON BASSET in episode 108 of BRIDGERTON Cr. LIAM DANIEL/NETFLIX � 2020

3. Regé-Jean Page

Age : 34 Odds : 11/2

If EON wanted to immediately convert an army of Bridgerton fans to the charms of the James Bond franchise, it would immediately cast one-time Ton heartthrob Regé-Jean Page. And aside from the seismic impact of casting an actor of colour as James Bond, Page is a fast-rising performer whose magnetism will be on show on the big screen this summer in Dungeons & Dragons: Honor Among Thieves alongside Star Trek ’s Chris Pine. Will that represent James Bond and James Kirk sharing a screen? Bookies have him at 11/2 for the Bond role. 

View this post on Instagram A post shared by James Norton (@jginorton)

4. James Norton

Age : 37 Current odds : 7/1

If he gets the role, the magnificently-haired Londoner would represent the most luxuriantly-maned Bond since Brosnan. And the rumour mill has had him firmly in the running since McMafia and War and Peace first introduced the UK’s living rooms to him. Most of his best work so far has been on the stage or small screen – he’s currently playing a proper wrong’un in the BBC’s crime series Happy Valley – although he put in an eye-catching performance in 2020’s Stalin-era journalism drama Mr Jones .  

5. Tom Hardy

Age : 45 Current odds : 7/1

The Venom and Peaky Blinders star has been linked with the role since long before it was actually available. But at 45, he doesn’t seem to fit the profile Michael G Wilson has set out of a ‘thirtysomething’ actor. Then again, a conversation around the new Bond can hardly not involve Hardy’s name. He helped turbo-charge Mad Max: Fury Road , despite having about seven words to say, and his suave spy in Inception was a stellar 007 audition. If EON is looking for a beefy badass with soulful vibes and serious acting craft, Hardy could be the guy. He might insist on wearing a mask, though .

6. Chiwetel Ejiofor

Age : 45 Odds : 9/1

Back in 2014, there were strong rumours that 12 Years a Slave actor Chiwetel Ejiofor would be playing a Bond villain in Spectre . That never came to pass, theoretically leaving the Londoner in the shake-up to play 007. Naomie Harris is in favour – and no Bond ever got anywhere without Moneypenny on board – but his age would seem to count against him.  

7. Dan Stevens

Age : 40 Odds : 14/1

Suave, charming and a big cricket lover, Dan Stevens seems like the kind of James Bond that Ian Fleming might have cast. Scratch a bit deeper, though, and there’s a darker edge to the one-time Downton Abbey actor. Check out 2014’s terrific neon-tinged action-thriller The Guest if you have any doubts he could do all the nastier stuff Bond gets up to between saving his country and annoying M. 

8. Idris Elba

Age : 50 Odds : 16/1

It’s not going to be Idris . We should all probably stop asking him about it now.

9. Aidan Turner

Age : 39 Odds : 20/1 One-time Poldark saucepot Aidan Turner would be the second Irishman to play 007 if he landed the gig. And like Pierce Brosnan, he packs a tonne of charm under a self-contained exterior. Will his relative lack of big-screen experience rule him out?

No Time to Die explained: All your James Bond plot questions answered .

The biggest and best films to see in 2023 .

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No Time to Die

Common sense media reviewers.

ratings of new james bond movie

Violent Bond adventure is flawed but still epic, emotional.

No Time to Die Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

Movie is largely about violence and how it scars u

Bond often relies on violence to accomplish his go

While Bond is (as ever) a White man, there's a fai

Guns and shooting. Many characters are shot and/or

A couple is shown kissing passionately and lying i

Infrequent language includes a use of "f--k," plus

As with other Bond movies, this one features many

Frequent drinking in bars, clubs, parties, etc. --

Parents need to know that No Time to Die is the 25th James Bond movie and the fifth with Daniel Craig in the lead role. It's more epic, tragic, and emotional than is typical for the franchise, and, despite its length (163 minutes), it's worth seeing for teen and adult fans. Expect the usual guns and shooting,…

Positive Messages

Movie is largely about violence and how it scars us. Asserts that it's our choices that make us who we are. A choice is made here that proves the point.

Positive Role Models

Bond often relies on violence to accomplish his goals, is frequently driven by revenge, has his share of vices, has been known to choose iffy ways of resolving problems. But he's loyal to the end, determined to carry out his mission. He even makes a great sacrifice to save the rest of the world. The three main characters all have violent pasts and have been shaped in various ways by those pasts.

Diverse Representations

While Bond is (as ever) a White man, there's a fairly diverse cast of supporting characters. Nomi, a Black woman, is the newest double-0 agent; Moneypenny is also now a Black woman; Poloma proves she can fight alongside Bond with no trouble; and CIA agent Felix Leiter is Black. This installment also shares the fact that Q dates men. The actor who plays the villain, Rami Malek, is of Egyptian ancestry. Unfortunately, the series continues to indulge in the damaging stereotype that people with disabilities are villainous. In this case, Malek's character has a facial difference.

Did we miss something on diversity? Suggest an update.

Violence & Scariness

Guns and shooting. Many characters are shot and/or killed. Explosions. Faces blister, characters scream and die from a deadly chemical weapon. Blood drips from a wound. Choking. Fighting, stunts. Car and motorcycle chases and crashes. Sinking boat. Children in peril. Teen who's stalked by a masked killer falls into a frozen lake; teen shoots man with pistol. Jump scare. Villain's false eye pops out, false eye fried by electromagnetic pulse. Poison plants.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

A couple is shown kissing passionately and lying in bed together. A topless woman lies face down with her bare back shown (bottom covered by sheet). Revealing clothing. Man takes a shower, shirtless, shown to his waist and hips. Background kissing at a party.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

Infrequent language includes a use of "f--k," plus "s--t," "ass," and "hell," and "Jesus Christ" and "my God" used as exclamations.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Products & Purchases

As with other Bond movies, this one features many sponsors with product placements, including Heineken beer, Omega wristwatches, and various outfits, fashion accessories, and vehicles. Advertising isn't overt.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Frequent drinking in bars, clubs, parties, etc. -- beer, scotch, vodka martinis, etc. A minor character seems to drink too much (she passes out). Another character gulps down a martini to combat her nervousness. Young girl pours her a glass from a box of wine. Smoking. Pill bottles shown.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that No Time to Die is the 25th James Bond movie and the fifth with Daniel Craig in the lead role. It's more epic, tragic, and emotional than is typical for the franchise, and, despite its length (163 minutes), it's worth seeing for teen and adult fans. Expect the usual guns and shooting, fighting, chases, crashes, and stunts. While there's little blood, characters are killed, some by gruesome, face-blistering chemical weapons. A child and a teen are in peril at different points; the teen shoots a gun and falls into an icy lake. Characters kiss passionately and lie in bed together; there's the suggestion of nudity, but nothing explicit is shown. Infrequent language includes a use of "f--k" and a use of "s--t," plus "ass," "Jesus Christ," etc. Characters drink frequently in social situations, and one minor character appears drunk. Smoking is also shown. While there are more diverse representations here than in previous Bond movies, it does still perpetuate the stereotype that people with disabilities are villainous. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

Where to Watch

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ratings of new james bond movie

Community Reviews

  • Parents say (16)
  • Kids say (42)

Based on 16 parent reviews

best bond. spoiler, he dies. sooooo sad

What's the story.

In NO TIME TO DIE, James Bond ( Daniel Craig ) and Madeleine Swann ( Léa Seydoux ) are in a loving relationship. Madeleine wants Bond to find closure for his feelings for the late Vesper Lynd, but when he visits the cemetery, her memorial explodes. He's then chased by mysterious gunmen, who nearly kill him. Bond realizes that Madeleine might have tipped someone off, and he leaves her. Years later, Bond is living alone, off the grid, when his old CIA pal Felix Leiter ( Jeffrey Wright ) approaches him, asking for help. A deadly weapon that uses nanotechnology and could destroy the world has been stolen. It could be the work of Blofeld ( Christoph Waltz ), although he's still in prison. It's up to Bond and new helpers Paloma ( Ana de Armas ) and Nomi ( Lashana Lynch ) -- the latest double-0 agent -- to find out who's behind this. But what's at stake when Madeleine re-enters the picture?

Is It Any Good?

Overlong and with some weak (and confusing) spots, this outing still has a grand, tragic arc, with spectacular action and characters -- both James Bond and the others -- who feel more human. Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga , No Time to Die certainly could have been trimmed a bit shorter than its 2 hours and 43 minutes. A comic Russian scientist (David Dencik) is a bit much; he recalls -- and pales in comparison to -- Alan Cumming's Boris Grishenko in GoldenEye (1995). And the attempt to keep the villain's identity a secret, when Rami Malek is second-billed, seems needlessly convoluted. (Malek gives a Bela Lugosi-like performance, slathered in Boris Karloff-like makeup.) But the movie's confidence in both its action and its characters is infectious.

Craig feels totally alive here, pulling off incredible stunts. Yet his quieter scenes are even more impressive. He's allowed to feel rage, regret, even caring. While No Time to Die includes the standard Bond vodka martini, tuxedo, watch, car, and "Bond, James Bond" tagline, it's not just another formulaic entry. It shares DNA (and a song) with the series' most unique entry, On Her Majesty's Secret Service , and it's thematically similar to both The Dark Knight Returns and Logan , increasing its scope but also deepening its emotional intensity. The notably (especially for Bond) diverse supporting cast gets many moments to show their own emotions and developments, rather than merely being there to serve or react to 007 (perhaps credit for that is due to co-screenwriter Phoebe Waller-Bridge ?). Ana de Armas and Lashana Lynch in particular would be most welcome back in any future movies.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about No Time to Die 's violence . How did it make you feel? Was it exciting? Shocking? What did the movie show or not show to achieve this effect? Why is that important?

Do you consider James Bond a role model ? Why, or why not?

How is drinking portrayed in the movie? Is it glamorized? Are there consequences? Why does that matter?

What is the movie's theme? Can we escape the things that happened to us by making good choices, or are we locked in to a certain destiny? How so?

Have you noticed that James Bond movies tend to have villains with disabilities or differences? What message does that send viewers? How does it perpetuate harmful stereotypes ?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : October 8, 2021
  • On DVD or streaming : December 21, 2023
  • Cast : Daniel Craig , Rami Malek , Lea Seydoux , Lashana Lynch
  • Director : Cary Joji Fukunaga
  • Inclusion Information : Middle Eastern/North African actors, Black actors
  • Studios : MGM , United Artists Releasing
  • Genre : Action/Adventure
  • Run time : 163 minutes
  • MPAA rating : PG-13
  • MPAA explanation : sequences of violence and action, some disturbing images, brief strong language and some suggestive material
  • Award : Golden Globe
  • Last updated : December 30, 2023

Did we miss something on diversity?

Research shows a connection between kids' healthy self-esteem and positive portrayals in media. That's why we've added a new "Diverse Representations" section to our reviews that will be rolling out on an ongoing basis. You can help us help kids by suggesting a diversity update.

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Review: “No Time to Die” Leaves Daniel Craig’s James Bond Legacy Unfulfilled

ratings of new james bond movie

By Richard Brody

Image may contain Clothing Apparel Human Person Suit Coat Overcoat Daniel Craig Audience Crowd and Tuxedo

For those whose cinematic consciousness predates “Star Wars,” the James Bond series may be the primordial experience of franchise films, with all the pleasures and limitations that they entail. The appealing predictability of familiar characters and the excitement of seeing variations on their themes has always gone hand in hand with a sense of overmanagement—of the strings being pulled by some puppeteer far from the set. The feeling that what’s onscreen is inseparable from the demands of the balance sheet has never been absent from the Bond market, and the five entries starring Daniel Craig have only intensified it. Together, the Craig films interconnect to form a sort of Bond cinematic universe whose parts slot all too neatly into a series, with all the dramatic engineering that it implies. The most recent and final Craig film, “No Time to Die,” directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, is in that sense a culmination of the series’ necessities, with the boardroom and the writers’ room virtually taking the place of any cinematic action.

On the other hand, the series’ essential virtue was always its extravagant exaggerations—it was gloriously ridiculous and gloriously lacking in self-awareness, its macho ribaldry invested with absurdly high purpose. In the Daniel Craig era, there’s no sense of unconscious or excess expression—it has been digitized out along with any intentional humor. The devices that Bond and his compatriots use are hardly a step from Maxwell Smart’s shoe phone, as are the switch-operated gizmos of his Aston Martin. Yet their depiction and use are so perfunctory that they’re presented as neither silly nor ordinary, just checked off. Craig is a great actor who brings a distinctive affect to Bond—clenched, airtight, impenetrable, abraded. He makes Bond’s social graces seem like the product of work that’s harder than the athleticized superhero business imposed upon the character. Craig’s distinctive persona suggests pathos that the series doesn’t allow; instead, he’s merely used as a Bond-piñata, a straining for an element of realism amid stunts that, in their grandiosity and their excess, preclude it. In “No Time to Die,” Bond is launched with mourning and melancholy: he and his new partner, Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), visit the Italian town of Matera, where the tomb of Vesper Lynd (from “Casino Royale”) is found. Bond visits her tomb—which explodes, as a prelude to a mighty chase and shoot-out. He survives but immediately ends the romance with Madeleine, whom he suspects of setting him up.

Five years later, Bond, retired to Jamaica, gets a visit from an old associate, Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright), of the C.I.A., along with a smarmy young State Department official named Logan Ash (Billy Magnussen). They want Bond’s help in finding a scientist named Valdo Obruchev (David Dencik), who has been kidnapped from a high-security bioweapon facility with a dreadful concoction in hand: a mortal virus-like nanobot, transmitted on contact and engineered to target specific DNA markers, whether of an individual, a family, or an ethnicity. But it takes a visit, that very night, from another M.I.6 operative, Nomi (Lashana Lynch)—who now bears Bond’s former number, 007—to persuade Bond of the urgency of the mission, and he joins in. It seems that Blofeld (Christoph Waltz), Bond’s longtime nemesis (dating back to childhood, as we now know), and Blofeld’s dastardly organization Spectre, is behind the kidnapping. But, infiltrating a Spectre gathering in Cuba, Bond and Nomi note the involvement of another evil mastermind, Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek), and the mission now involves targeting him along with Obruchev.

Yet “No Time to Die” offers a new piece of the puzzle, a bit of backstory that’s of obvious and major significance (shh) and that, by its very nature, suggests what’s both right and wrong with the franchise reboot in the Craig era. In the film’s opening, pre-title sequence, Madeleine is a child of about five (played by Lisa-Dorah Sonnet), staying with her mother (Mathilde Bourbin) in an isolated house in a snowy field and yearning for the return of her father (Mr. White, introduced in “Casino Royale”). She thinks he’s a doctor; her mother reveals that he’s a killer. Moments later, a masked gunman—Safin—shows up and breaks in. When Safin was a child, he explains, Mr. White killed his entire family, leaving only Safin to survive. Now, seeking revenge, he kills Madeleine’s mother, and prepares to kill the fleeing Madeleine, yet—in a moment of pity that may also carry an element of self-recognition—lets her go. (The moment, like so many others in the film, is merely conveyed in an informative wink rather than actually unfurled at any length.) Along with imparting the trauma and grief that Madeleine bears, the sequence insures that, later in the film, when Safin intrudes into Bond’s affairs, Madeleine can’t be far behind.

This setup implies a broader question about the role and use of backstory in recent movies. In principle, the prevalence of backstory advances an overdue democratization of the cinema: it eliminates the notion of typecasting and recognizes that each individual’s background and experience are distinctive and significant. Yet, like any dramatic method, the planting of backstory can take a decadent form, as it does in “No Time to Die,” where backstory is used to reduce the characters’ motives to single factors. With the setting up of one past experience, the movie bypasses any consideration of Madeleine (let alone Safin) as a character and turns her into a dramatic mechanism—rendering her not more of an individual but less of one. Fascinatingly and dismayingly, backstories are applied only very selectively and deterministically in “No Time to Die.” The movie brings several important new characters into the franchise, starting with Nomi, the new 007, who is a Black woman, and including Paloma (Ana de Armas), a C.I.A. agent who guides Bond into the Spectre meeting in Cuba. (The closest thing to humor that the movie offers is in the contrast between Paloma’s sunny ingenuousness and her mighty skills.) What motives prompted this admirably diverse cast of characters to serve their country in dangerous missions? What range of experience contributed to their ability to do so? The film never says. The diversity here is purely pictorial.

The formulaic drama is of a piece with the movie’s action sequences, which exhaust their ingenuity from the get-go, with the Matera chase and shoot-out. The single best moment is the very first, when, on a narrow bridge, Bond dodges a speeding car with a deft dive behind a convenient lump of concrete. The action soon grows wilder—a leap while holding a cable and a rough landing, a motorcycle jaunt up staircases and over a wall—and briefly offers a moment of tension, with Bond and Madeleine together in the Aston Martin while facing a barrage of bullets that the car’s windows barely withstand. (Bond’s stoic stillness in the face of Madeleine’s panic is also Craig’s best moment.) But, despite these (very brief) clever touches, the filming does this and other set pieces scant justice. Little attention is given to staging and placing, to ensembles and their timing, to the practicalities of massive stunts, whether chase scenes or shoot-outs or trouble on the high seas. What matters isn’t spatial coherence—which is only a virtue in real estate—but coherence of ideas, of emotions, of images. The shots, whether brief and collaged together or closely following Bond in motion, do little but convey the general concept or the basic facts, the input and the outcome. The rapid cutting and rapid camera movement don’t make the action hard to understand; they make it hard to enjoy. For all the agony that the story’s violence suggests, and the sense of rueful wonder, of horrified fascination, that it depends on, the filming gives no sense of experience either onscreen or behind it—merely a sense of dutiful, approximative technique.

“No Time to Die” wants it both ways: it makes watching violent shoot-outs and colossal catastrophes pleasurable while depicting them merely functionally, a coy fusion of the sumptuous and the abstemious. Similarly, the story is built upon an emotional foundation of melancholy and regret, of the sins of the fathers and the pain of their redemption. But these aspects of the drama get neither discussed nor developed, merely signified in the sweep of the action. Moreover, the story is almost completely depoliticized; the only hint of a viewpoint is when Ash is derisively pinpointed as a “political appointee.” All that remains, besides the vapors of nostalgia, are the broad contours of the drama, which are less matters of character or history than of positioning in the movie marketplace. Daniel Craig’s tenure as Bond is defined, ultimately, by the melancholy of unimagined possibilities and missed opportunities—for the actor and the character alike.

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Review: New James Bond film ‘No Time to Die’ is OK – but it’s no ‘Casino Royale’

The film that's daniel craig's farewell to the james bond role has its moments but it's far too long and ponderous..

This image released by Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures shows Daniel Craig, left, Ana de Armas in a scene from "No Time To Die." (Nicola Dove/Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures via AP)

How many Land Rovers had to die so this movie could live?

That’s one of the many existential questions moviegoers will have time to contemplate during the nearly three-hour running time of the sometimes ponderous new James Bond film, “No Time to Die,” the last to star Daniel Craig. That’s not always a bad thing. As Bond, portrayed by Craig, has gotten older, perhaps wiser while remaining shockingly fit, it makes sense that he has become more pensive and somber. This film — directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga (“True Detective,” “Beast of No Nation”) — certainly reflects that. It’s fitting, too, then that the downcast theme is sung by Billie Eilish.

Of course, there is action. That’s where all those luxury SUVs come in, and some of them die in terrible ways, along with the people who drive them. And some of the action is spectacular, as in an early set piece through the narrow streets of an Italian town. Plus, the film — partially shot in IMAX — looks fantastic.

Yet much of “No Time to Die” also drags, spinning its wheels as it lurches to a conclusion that it could have reached a half-hour sooner. Throw in a villain who’s not particularly compelling and the result is an often dispiriting way to say goodbye to Craig’s adventures in 007 spycraft.

As the film starts, Bond is already in retirement, leading a life of endless recreation and relaxation. Back at MI6, his old workplace, there’s even a new young agent, Nomi (Lashana Lynch, “Captain Marvel”), who has taken his 007 ID. He has well and truly faded into history and lore.

Rated PG-13 : For sequences of violence and action, some disturbing images, brief strong language and some suggestive material.

Running time : 163 minutes

Where : Opens Oct. 8 throughout Houston

**1/2 (out of 5)

He grieves by the grave of Vesper Lynd (the character played by Eva Green who died in the superior “Casino Royale” in 2006) and is preparing to live his best life with Madeline Swann (Léa Seydoux, “Spectre”) when things begin to go off the rails. Can she be trusted and what’s her connection to Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek), a standard-issue evil madman who wants to take over the world? (His scheme takes on added significance for moviegoers in the age of COVID but, obviously, there’s no way the filmmakers could have counted on tapping into those feelings since “No Time to Die” originally was due to be released in April 2020.) On top of that, Bond’s old nemesis Blofeld (Christoph Waltz) is still in the picture, too.

It’s because of Safin’s machinations and imminent threat (he has kidnapped an important scientist) that Bond is dragged back to duty, though this time working for the CIA through his friend Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright). But he still gets to liaise with his old team — M (Ralph Fiennes), Moneypenny (Naomie Harris), Q (Ben Whishaw) — and even partners with Nomi, though she’s at first not all too happy to see him come out of retirement.

But the movie’s most impressive crime-fighting pairing takes place in Cuba where Bond ends up with a young spy by his side by the name of Paloma (a fun Ana de Armas) who kicks the movie’s lethargic energy level up a couple of notches. Also worth noting is Billy Magnussen as Logan, a straight-arrow associate of Leiter’s who earns the nickname “Book of Mormon.”

As directed by Fukunaga from a script he wrote with Robert Wade, Neal Purvis and “Fleabag” creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge, “No Time to Die” only occasionally reaches the level of pathos it’s going for with its more serious tone. At the same time, it pales in comparison to some previous Bond films in terms of eye-popping action and the art of being clever.

The result is that “No Time to Die” falls somewhere in an unremarkable middle between Craig’s best Bond films (“Casino Royale,” “Skyfall”) and the lesser efforts (“Spectre,” “Quantum of Solace”). It’s not an especially great way to go out, for either Craig or those Land Rovers.

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Cary Darling joined the Houston Chronicle in 2017 where he writes about arts, entertainment and pop culture, with an emphasis on film and media. Originally from Los Angeles and a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, he has been a features reporter or editor at the Orange County Register, Miami Herald, and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. In addition, he has freelanced for a number of publications including the Los Angeles Times and Dallas Morning News.

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No Time To Die Is a Disappointing Finale for Daniel Craig’s James Bond

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The new James Bond movie, No Time To Die , is so disappointing that I don’t see how the iconic franchise can be reformed simply by creating a more woke 007.

ratings of new james bond movie

In No Time To Die , Daniel Craig is, as usual, given a ton of screen time to brood alcoholically about his rotten fate, which he does well. (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Universal Pictures)

Though it’s bound to make boatloads of money by the end of its run, No Time To Die is failing to bring theater attendance back with a bang. Attendance is thinner than expected. I saw the film in an almost empty theater, and a young multiplex employee shrugged philosophically, “People who still care about James Bond are older . . .” And it seems the older demographic is the most reluctant to return to theaters.

Judging by the media chatter and some of the narrative moves in this latest installment, the so-so opening numbers are probably one more factor in pushing the owners of the lucrative Bond franchise to do what it seems they were planning on anyway; that is, pivot sharply away from the traditional James Bond. Perhaps a female Agent 007? Perhaps a black female Agent 007? Lashana Lynch already plays just such a character in No Time To Die , setting up an amusing rivalry for the 007 number with Bond (Daniel Craig), who returns from an emotionally bruising five-year aborted retirement to find himself replaced. “I bet you thought they’d retire the number,” she snarks at him.

An even better contender for a new 007 would be the Cuban female agent named Paloma, played by the delightful Ana de Armas (Craig’s costar in Knives Out ). She’s getting all the rave reviews for her brief dazzling turn in the Havana sequence of No Time To Die. She plays an effervescent spy with three weeks’ training who announces her nervousness about the mission with disarming frankness and deals with it by pounding one of Bond’s shaken-not-stirred martinis in one gulp. Dolled up in the usual Bond-girl wear, a revealing knockout of an evening gown, she treats Bond with an unprecedented all-spies-together friendliness. And she handles the inevitable fight scene with such high-heeled-roundhouse-kick aplomb that he says with a bemused smile as they part, “You were excellent .”

“You too!” she enthuses cheerfully. “Next time, stay longer!”

You’ll wait through much of the rest of a very long movie hoping in vain that she’s going to come back. She’s such a breath of fresh air among usual-suspect characters such as Q (Ben Whishaw), Eve Moneypenny (Naomie Harris), Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright), and returning villain Ernst Blofeld (Christoph Waltz). Even new villain Lyutsifer Safin (Rami Malek) doesn’t make much of an impression; he’s such a recessive, talky figure, and you can’t have two talky villains once Christoph Waltz’s patented elegant yammering has been established.

But that’s what reboots are for: to expand on the potential of new characters. Though I admit I still don’t see how this franchise can be reformed merely by creating a more woke 007. The whole thing’s a Tory imperialist fantasy.

Personally, I liked the Craig Bond series, though it made for a wildly uneven five films. Casino Royale , Skyfall , and No Time To Die are clearly the best of them, in descending order of quality, but regardless of how well the individual movies came off, Craig did consistently great work with the latest take on the character. In order to update an unregenerate figure of Cold War–era masculinity, the creators of the Craig Bond did something smart — they put him into a dark, lonely rage, and returned him there every time he got too quippy and sure of himself. Plus, they made him aware that he was doomed by giving him a backstory that skirted the edge of The Bourne Identity in the way it established Bond as a glorified killer engineered by MI6, the British Secret Intelligence Service, who only gradually becomes aware of what has been done to him.

As M (Judi Dench) tells him coldly in Skyfall about why he’d been chosen for such a bleak fate, “Orphans make the best agents.”

In No Time To Die , Craig is, as usual, given a ton of screen time to brood alcoholically about his rotten fate, which he does well. He’s even better at playing action scenes now — as if he’s so personally pissed off when enemy agents attack him that he’s going to murder them even harder than he intended to in the first place. That’s a surefire favorite action-movie development, when one feels ironic pity for the innumerable, faceless enemies chasing Bond down, guns blazing: “Ooh, now they made him mad .”

In the Craig Bonds, the film-noir-izing of James Bond was an inspired choice. His uglier qualities — the callous violence, the brutal sexism, the paranoia — emerged out of the wounds of his sociopathic old-school training. I wish they’d gone further with this than they did and finally make Bond a rogue agent who stayed rogue. Right up through No Time To Die , Bond keeps rediscovering how contemptible his MI6 bosses are and calling them out on it — he dismissively asks replacement M (Ralph Fiennes), “Did this desk get larger, or did you get smaller?” — only to forgive and forget and return to “God Save the Queen” patriotism in the end.

But at least it was nicely ambitious to do a complete Bond story arc, beginning with the first film and biggest triumph of the series, Casino Royale , when young Bond is assigned his first mission as 007 and makes such a barbaric bloody mess in getting the job done that M sighs, “I knew I promoted you too soon.” One excellent result of this Bond’s bitter rage is it cuts through some of the more sickening displays of luxury consumer goods he wears, drives, and drinks — a big part of the Bond film fantasy. It’s made clear in Casino Royale that he’s overcompensating for his rootless, savage youth by out-toffing the toffs, wearing bespoke tailor suits, and driving absurdly expensive sports cars.

Mortality in No Time To Die is concentrated on Bond’s discovery of a potential way to redeem his life through love, which hadn’t seemed possible since the death of Vesper Lynd (the marvelous Eva Green) in Casino Royale . But it seems he’s betrayed again, this time around by the French love he found in Spectre , Dr. Madeleine Swann (Lea Seydoux, meh).

Can he salvage anything from the wreckage of his crushed romantic hopes and luxurious but blighted life? Well — that’s a spoiler — you have to buy a ticket to find out. Plenty of seats are available!

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This obscure Liam Neeson vs. James Bond movie is a new Netflix hit. Here’s why you should watch it

Blair Marnell

If you’ve never heard of the Western Seraphim Falls , then you’re not alone. The film barely had a limited theatrical release in 2006 before it spent the better part of two decades in cinematic purgatory. Or at least that was true before Netflix added it to its film library. Now, all of a sudden, Seraphim Falls is one of the most popular movies on Netflix .

It features two action icons facing off

Neeson and brosnan give compelling performances, seraphim falls feels like an old school western.

By itself, that’s not too surprising. Liam Neeson has proven to be very popular with Netflix subscribers, and another one of his lesser-known movies, Made In Italy , is also currently in Netflix’s top 10 movie list. But if you’re trying to decide whether this particular Western will appeal to you, we’re sharing three reasons why you should watch Neeson’s Seraphim Falls on Netflix.

At the time that Seraphim Falls was released in 2006, it had only been four years since Pierce Brosnan’s final appearance as James Bond in 2002’s Die Another Day . As for Neeson, this film came out four years before he reinvented himself as an action icon in Taken , and he’s been headlining action movies ever since.

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The combined pedigrees of Neeson and Brosnan didn’t attract a wide audience to Seraphim Falls , and the film itself only had a limited release over the course of six weeks. That’s why it’s been such an obscure title for close to two decades. However, its newfound popularity on Netflix suggests that the pairing of Neeson and Brosnan is even more enticing now than it was in 2006. That also leads into the next reason for this movie’s resurgence.

This film wouldn’t work if audiences couldn’t buy into the characters that Neeson and Brosnan play on-screen. Neeson’s Colonel Morsman Carver is a man consumed by a desire to avenge himself by killing Brosnan’s Gideon. Whatever humanity Carver had before their feud has seemingly been set aside, and he is now nothing without his revenge.

As for Gideon, he’s a broken man haunted by his guilt. And yet he doesn’t just sit back and do nothing as Carver and his posse pursue him. Gideon fights back and he even picks off many of his pursuers in intriguing ways. But long before we know what Gideon did to inspire such hatred from Carver, it’s very easy to believe these man have a history that will ultimately destroy them. Neeson and Brosnan’s collective performances elevate what could have just been dismissed as a B-movie Western.

Although Seraphim Falls is technically a revisionist Western that downplays the romanticism of the setting in favor of realism, the way that director and co-writer David Von Ancken filmed it makes this movie feel like an old-school Western. It even depicts the toll that the harsh environments take on Gideon and Carver before bringing both men to the end of their respective ropes.

There is a also bit of potential otherworldliness about Anjelica Huston’s character, Madame Louise, who gives both men part of what they need to kill each other. That may put off fans who prefer a fully traditional Western. But on the whole, this is a rare modern Western that feels like it truly belongs to the genre.

Watch Seraphim Falls on Netflix .

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Blair Marnell

Sometimes, all you need is a great crime drama after a tough day. Peacock’s library of content continues to grow, and includes plenty of shows from the NBC library, both new and old, as well as streaming originals. The streaming service introduced exciting new shows like Poker Face and Twisted Metal last year, with more coming in 2024.

If you’re looking for shows that explore the battle between good versus evil, and delve into the crimes committed and the perpetrators captured, consider these three Peacock crime dramas you should watch in February 2024. Dr. Death (2021-2023)

Alexander: The Making of a God depicts the life of the legendary Greek conqueror and his rise to power. Part documentary and part scripted series, Alexander is bound to become one of Netflix's best shows or at least one of the most talked-about, especially as it depicts the titular character as not necessarily straight — something anyone with a bare minimum of historical knowledge will know is true.

Those who enjoy Alexander: The Making of a God might leave the show longing for more Ancient Greece content. My advice to them is to play Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, a game that brings 400 BC Greece to life with stunning detail. However, if they don't want to invest 100-plus hours into the game, they'd do well to check these movies out. With similar tones, themes, and characters, these movies will scratch the itch that Alexander: The Making of a King provokes. In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great (1998)

Netflix subscribers love their thrillers. That may be why the recently released Fool Me Once is now one of the most popular shows on Netflix. In this adaptation of Harlan Coben's hit novel, Michelle Keegan stars as Maya Stern, a woman who is emotionally bereft after the death of her husband, Joe Burkett (Richard Armitage). When Maya sees proof that Joe isn't dead, it sends her down a rabbit hole as she tries to figure out why his death was faked.

Once you've finished watching Fool Me Once, you should check out these three other shows on Netflix that you should watch. All of our picks are mysteries and thrillers, but only the first show on our list, Bodies, actually adds some sci-fi elements to the mix. Bodies (2023)

Next James Bond Movie Will Be a 'Complete Reinvention' For the Series

But who will land the coveted role of 007.

Ryan Leston Avatar

007’s next outing will completely reinvent the James Bond series. According to producer Barbara Broccoli, the 26th Bond movie will reinvent who James Bond is… but they haven’t found an actor to take up the mantle just yet.

“Nobody’s in the running,” she said in a new story via Deadline . “We’re working out where to go with him, we’re talking that through. There isn’t a script, and we can’t come up with one until we decide how we’re going to approach the next film because, really, it’s a reinvention of Bond. We’re reinventing who he is and that takes time. I’d say that filming is at least two years away.”

Broccoli’s comments were made during a BFI Fellowship dinner where she and Michael G. Wilson were honored for their fellowship. The pair were awarded their fellowships by series regulars Ralph Fiennes and Naomie Harris… and it seems that Fiennes couldn’t help but quip that he’s on-hand and ready to train up the new 007.

“[You] killed Bond,” he joked, referencing Daniel Craig’s exit in No Time to Die . “Naomie and I are the people to fix it. You find him and we’ll train him.”

Of course, Broccoli previously stated that the search for the next James Bond would begin in 2022 after Craig’s dramatic exit prompted speculation about who would become the world’s greatest spy in his wake.

“We're not thinking about it at all,” she said at the time. “We want Daniel [Craig] to have his time of celebration. Next year we'll start thinking about the future.”

Craig first portrayed Bond in the 2006 film Casino Royale . He reprised the role of 007 in 2008's Quantum of Solace , 2012's Skyfall , and 2015's Spectre , which have collectively grossed more than $3.1 billion at the worldwide box office.

The Next James Bonds Who Never Played 007

ratings of new james bond movie

Who will take up the role of Bond, James Bond? For now, we’ll have to wait and see.

But it looks as though the search is on for the next 007. And it sounds as though it’s going to be an exciting time to be a secret agent.

Want to find out more about 007? Check out Broccoli's comments about why 007 can never be a woman and Daniel Craig’s advice for the next British superspy.

Ryan Leston is an entertainment journalist and film critic for IGN. You can follow him on Twitter .

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Michael keaton, james marsden share a deadly bond in ‘knox goes away’ trailer.

Keaton directed the thriller that co-stars Al Pacino and is set to hit theaters next month.

By Ryan Gajewski

Ryan Gajewski

Senior Entertainment Reporter

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Knox Goes Away

Michael Keaton faces no shortage of obstacles as an aging assassin in the trailer for Knox Goes Away .

The trailer was released Wednesday for the thriller that features Keaton as director and star. The movie centers on Keaton as a hit man diagnosed with dementia who learns that his estranged son ( James Marsden ) needs help after committing a violent crime.

“I’ve never asked you for anything in my life,” Marsden says in the footage. “But I’m desperate.”

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Keaton directed the film from a script by Gregory Poirier. Marcia Gay Harden and Al Pacino co-star in the project that counts Nick Gordon, Trevor Matthews, Michael Sugar and Ashley Zalta as producers.

Knox Goes Away premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in September, and Saban Films is set to release it March 15.

In his review for The Hollywood Reporter , film critic Frank Scheck wrote that Keaton “delivers a terrific performance” but that the “convoluted storyline is too clever by far, and might have proved entertaining if the film had been intended as an absurdist black comedy.”

Keaton recently appeared in The Flash and is set to co-star in this year’s forthcoming sequel Beetlejuice Beetlejuice . Knox Goes Away marks his second feature as a director, following 2009’s The Merry Gentleman .

Marsden’s recent credits include the 2022 movie sequel Disenchanted , and he earned an Emmy nomination for his role in last year’s comedy series Jury Duty .

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The James Bond movies, ranked

Posted: January 7, 2024 | Last updated: January 8, 2024

<p>Bond. James Bond. Agent 007. License to kill. For 57 years, the deadly, debonair MI6 operative has captured our imagination with his big-screen exploits based on the novels of Ian Fleming. Under the aegis of Eon Productions, he has been officially portrayed by six actors: Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan, and Daniel Craig. The books were brisk, brutal reads (JFK was a fan), while the films gradually became big-budget extravaganzas. The movie series has lost its way several times, but to date, the producers have been able to reinvent it for younger audiences. What are the best ever James Bond films? Which ones have stood the test of time and survived the drastically shifting cultural tides? Here are the official Eon-produced Bond films ranked from worst to best.</p>

James Bond movies, ranked

Bond. James Bond. Agent 007. License to kill. For 57 years, the deadly, debonair MI6 operative has captured our imagination with his big-screen exploits based on the novels of Ian Fleming. Under the aegis of Eon Productions, he has been officially portrayed by six actors: Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan, and Daniel Craig. The books were brisk, brutal reads (JFK was a fan), while the films gradually became big-budget extravaganzas. The movie series has lost its way several times, but to date, the producers have been able to reinvent it for younger audiences. What are the best ever James Bond films? Which ones have stood the test of time and survived the drastically shifting cultural tides? Here are the official Eon-produced Bond films ranked from worst to best.

<p>Pierce Brosnan’s final Bond movie opens promisingly enough with a brutal torture sequence. An hour later, he’s skidding around a literal ice palace in an invisible car. So much for gritty reboot. The Bond producers were resignedly considering a spinoff series for Halle Berry’s Jinx at the time, and she’s certainly the only person in this film with a pulse. We’d still line up for a Halle Berry franchise, just not at the expense of James Bond.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/the_25_best_musicals_of_all_time_121723/s1__37150190'>The 25 best musicals of all time</a></p>

"Die Another Day"

Pierce Brosnan’s final Bond movie opens promisingly enough with a brutal torture sequence. An hour later, he’s skidding around a literal ice palace in an invisible car. So much for gritty reboot. The Bond producers were resignedly considering a spinoff series for Halle Berry’s Jinx at the time, and she’s certainly the only person in this film with a pulse. We’d still line up for a Halle Berry franchise, just not at the expense of James Bond.

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<p>Christopher Lee co-stars as a villain named Scaramanga with a superfluous nipple who employs Hervé Villechaize as a sabotage-happy henchman, and yet this movie is an almost total disaster. Ken Adam has fun with his production design on an upended ship that doubles as an MI6 command center, and there’s a phenomenal, completely practical corkscrew car jump that would never be allowed today for fear of getting people killed. Otherwise, this is trash.</p>

"The Man with the Golden Gun"

Christopher Lee co-stars as a villain named Scaramanga with a superfluous nipple who employs Hervé Villechaize as a sabotage-happy henchman, and yet this movie is an almost total disaster. Ken Adam has fun with his production design on an upended ship that doubles as an MI6 command center, and there’s a phenomenal, completely practical corkscrew car jump that would never be allowed today for fear of getting people killed. Otherwise, this is trash.

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<p>Sean Connery skipped out on the Bond film that would’ve cemented his legacy (“On Her Majesty’s Secret Service”), but he returned for this Las Vegas-set goofball garbage because, well, money. Bond tangles with a Howard Hughes-esque mogul’s female henchwomen (Bambi and Thumper), and commandeers a moon buggy at a space lab (playing into the lunar madness of the post-landing early ‘70s), but the film is depressingly gimmicky. It was probably a blast to shoot, but it’s a chore to sit through.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/the_40_greatest_action_stars_of_all_time_010724/s1__29640071'>The 40 greatest action stars of all time</a></p>

"Diamonds Are Forever"

Sean Connery skipped out on the Bond film that would’ve cemented his legacy (“On Her Majesty’s Secret Service”), but he returned for this Las Vegas-set goofball garbage because, well, money. Bond tangles with a Howard Hughes-esque mogul’s female henchwomen (Bambi and Thumper), and commandeers a moon buggy at a space lab (playing into the lunar madness of the post-landing early ‘70s), but the film is depressingly gimmicky. It was probably a blast to shoot, but it’s a chore to sit through.

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<p>Maud Adams returns to the franchise in the titillating titular role, Steven Berkoff turns up as a heavy, and James Bond dons a gorilla suit. Those are the highlights. This is a weirdly tentative retreat to the silliness of pre-“For Your Eyes Only” Moore; the series was directionless in the early 1980s, playing the hits while waiting for a younger, hunkier Bond. It holds together OK as a movie, but Moore was begging for the pasture.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"Octopūssy"

Maud Adams returns to the franchise in the titillating titular role, Steven Berkoff turns up as a heavy, and James Bond dons a gorilla suit. Those are the highlights. This is a weirdly tentative retreat to the silliness of pre-“For Your Eyes Only” Moore; the series was directionless in the early 1980s, playing the hits while waiting for a younger, hunkier Bond. It holds together OK as a movie, but Moore was begging for the pasture.

<p>Sophie Marceau gives an all-out performance as a psychotic oil heiress, and her scenes with Brosnan crackle, but the writers insist on Robert Carlyle’s rogue KGB agent being the main villain. It’s like making Edward G. Robinson the femme fatale of “Double Indemnity." Actually, that would be fascinating. Very little in Brosnan’s penultimate portrayal of Bond rises above somnambulant. The opening set piece is fun, and Garbage’s theme song is quite good. Denise Richards plays a nuclear physicist named Christmas Jones, which sets up a predictably filthy closing line.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/good_acoustics_the_20_greatest_mtv_unplugged_albums_010724/s1__24583690'>Good acoustics: The 20 greatest MTV 'Unplugged' albums</a></p>

"The World is Not Enough"

Sophie Marceau gives an all-out performance as a psychotic oil heiress, and her scenes with Brosnan crackle, but the writers insist on Robert Carlyle’s rogue KGB agent being the main villain. It’s like making Edward G. Robinson the femme fatale of “Double Indemnity." Actually, that would be fascinating. Very little in Brosnan’s penultimate portrayal of Bond rises above somnambulant. The opening set piece is fun, and Garbage’s theme song is quite good. Denise Richards plays a nuclear physicist named Christmas Jones, which sets up a predictably filthy closing line.

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<p>Roger Moore was pushing 60 when he returned for his final performance as James Bond, and he’s visibly out of breath at times during the film’s cruelly numerous action sequences. Released during the summer of 1985, the movie benefited from MTV’s heavy-rotation airing of Duran Duran’s excellent theme song and got a serious kink infusion from the casting of Christopher Walken and Grace Jones. It’s good, gaudy fun at times — a fine sendoff to the indefatigably cheeky Moore.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"A View to a Kill"

Roger Moore was pushing 60 when he returned for his final performance as James Bond, and he’s visibly out of breath at times during the film’s cruelly numerous action sequences. Released during the summer of 1985, the movie benefited from MTV’s heavy-rotation airing of Duran Duran’s excellent theme song and got a serious kink infusion from the casting of Christopher Walken and Grace Jones. It’s good, gaudy fun at times — a fine sendoff to the indefatigably cheeky Moore.

<p>The fourth act of “Casino Royale," Craig and the writers were presented with the opportunity to make an 80-minute revenge film (i.e. a ruthlessly streamlined version of the movie Dalton wanted to make with “Licence to Kill”) but instead padded it out with the obligatory scenes audiences expect from a Bond movie. The dispatching of Mathieu Almaric’s Dominic Greene is a nasty bit of business that’s vintage Fleming, but it doesn’t connect as viciously as it should. If you want to learn how not to edit a big-budget action sequence, “Quantum of Solace” is your “Citizen Kane."</p>

"Quantum of Solace"

The fourth act of “Casino Royale," Craig and the writers were presented with the opportunity to make an 80-minute revenge film (i.e. a ruthlessly streamlined version of the movie Dalton wanted to make with “Licence to Kill”) but instead padded it out with the obligatory scenes audiences expect from a Bond movie. The dispatching of Mathieu Almaric’s Dominic Greene is a nasty bit of business that’s vintage Fleming, but it doesn’t connect as viciously as it should. If you want to learn how not to edit a big-budget action sequence, “Quantum of Solace” is your “Citizen Kane."

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<p>This is easily the most derided Bond film since “Die Another Day," but is it really that bad? Director Sam Mendes did his best to reintroduce the cheekiness of the Moore Bond films he enjoyed as a child while serving Craig’s edict to draw the series into more thematically provocative territory. The result is a narratively schizophrenic mess that appears to kill off Bond during a torture sequence — and the ensuing action only reinforces this conclusion. What that means for the franchise going forward will be dealt with in what is currently being called “Shatterhand." Perhaps this will be Bond’s “A Matter of Life and Death."</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"Spectre"

This is easily the most derided Bond film since “Die Another Day," but is it really that bad? Director Sam Mendes did his best to reintroduce the cheekiness of the Moore Bond films he enjoyed as a child while serving Craig’s edict to draw the series into more thematically provocative territory. The result is a narratively schizophrenic mess that appears to kill off Bond during a torture sequence — and the ensuing action only reinforces this conclusion. What that means for the franchise going forward will be dealt with in what is currently being called “Shatterhand." Perhaps this will be Bond’s “A Matter of Life and Death."

<p>Brosnan’s second Bond installment came within a few million dollars of besting “Titanic” over its opening weekend in December 1997, but, alas, it fell significantly short of its overall worldwide gross. This Roger Spottiswoode-directed film features a crackerjack set piece wherein Bond remotely drives a car from its back seat, and it pairs him with the great Michelle Yeoh, whose martial arts expertise nearly landed her a spinoff franchise. Yeoh is the show. Jonathan Pryce plays a world-domination-obsessed baddie inspired by Rupert Murdoch, which is splendid in theory and limp in execution.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/20_tv_characters_who_were_recast_010724/s1__39326582'>20 TV characters who were recast</a></p>

"Tomorrow Never Dies"

Brosnan’s second Bond installment came within a few million dollars of besting “Titanic” over its opening weekend in December 1997, but, alas, it fell significantly short of its overall worldwide gross. This Roger Spottiswoode-directed film features a crackerjack set piece wherein Bond remotely drives a car from its back seat, and it pairs him with the great Michelle Yeoh, whose martial arts expertise nearly landed her a spinoff franchise. Yeoh is the show. Jonathan Pryce plays a world-domination-obsessed baddie inspired by Rupert Murdoch, which is splendid in theory and limp in execution.

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<p>Adjusted for inflation, “Thunderball” is the highest-grossing Bond movie of all time. It’s laden with gadgets and massive action set pieces, and every now and then it calms down for a few minutes to advance the story it has no interest in telling. It’s the Michael Bay of Bond movies. For kids of a certain era, Bond soaring around with a jetpack and getting into prolonged underwater brawls was the greatest thing ever. But what was a one-of-a-kind spectacle in 1965 is quite the slog nowadays. This goes double for the non-Eon remake, “Never Say Never Again," which brought Connery back to the role he swore he’d never play again. He should’ve stuck to that promise.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"Thunderball"

Adjusted for inflation, “Thunderball” is the highest-grossing Bond movie of all time. It’s laden with gadgets and massive action set pieces, and every now and then it calms down for a few minutes to advance the story it has no interest in telling. It’s the Michael Bay of Bond movies. For kids of a certain era, Bond soaring around with a jetpack and getting into prolonged underwater brawls was the greatest thing ever. But what was a one-of-a-kind spectacle in 1965 is quite the slog nowadays. This goes double for the non-Eon remake, “Never Say Never Again," which brought Connery back to the role he swore he’d never play again. He should’ve stuck to that promise.

<p>A great novel and a great theme song (via Paul McCartney and Wings) tee up a solid first go-round for Roger Moore as James Bond. This should be a better film. Yaphett Kotto’s Dr. Kananga/Mr. Big is a terrifically menacing baddie, and his henchmen — Tee Hee (Julius Harris), Whisper (Earl Jolly Brown) and Baron Samedi (Geoffrey Holder) — are the stuff of nightmares. The stunning Gloria Hendry gets a too-brief appearance as the first African-American Bond girl. But it’s junky. The redneck Sheriff Pepper (Clifton James) was a huge hit with audiences, but the comedic diversion he provides is at odds with the film’s mostly dark tone. If you ever wondered what a Bond film directed by Hal Needham might look like, here it is.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/best_solo_albums_from_singers_of_legendary_bands_121723/s1__37690611'>Best solo albums from singers of legendary bands</a></p>

"Live and Let Die"

A great novel and a great theme song (via Paul McCartney and Wings) tee up a solid first go-round for Roger Moore as James Bond. This should be a better film. Yaphett Kotto’s Dr. Kananga/Mr. Big is a terrifically menacing baddie, and his henchmen — Tee Hee (Julius Harris), Whisper (Earl Jolly Brown) and Baron Samedi (Geoffrey Holder) — are the stuff of nightmares. The stunning Gloria Hendry gets a too-brief appearance as the first African-American Bond girl. But it’s junky. The redneck Sheriff Pepper (Clifton James) was a huge hit with audiences, but the comedic diversion he provides is at odds with the film’s mostly dark tone. If you ever wondered what a Bond film directed by Hal Needham might look like, here it is.

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<p>The unprecedented blockbuster success of “Star Wars” launched countless imitators, and it’s a shame that this film, based on one of Ian Fleming’s best novels, was one of them. <em>That said</em>…round up some friends, crack open some beers and enjoy the space-bound heck out of the most egregiously silly James Bond film ever made. There are overt “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” references. Richard Kiel’s Jaws returns and falls in love with a braces-wearing nerd. It’s an out-of-control lark, and now that we know it didn’t kill the franchise we can appreciate it as <a href="https://www.cbr.com/marvels-assistant-editors-month-the-greatest-comic-books/" rel="noopener noreferrer">the Assistant Editors’ Month</a> of Bond movies.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"Moonraker"

The unprecedented blockbuster success of “Star Wars” launched countless imitators, and it’s a shame that this film, based on one of Ian Fleming’s best novels, was one of them. That said …round up some friends, crack open some beers and enjoy the space-bound heck out of the most egregiously silly James Bond film ever made. There are overt “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” references. Richard Kiel’s Jaws returns and falls in love with a braces-wearing nerd. It’s an out-of-control lark, and now that we know it didn’t kill the franchise we can appreciate it as the Assistant Editors’ Month of Bond movies.

<p>For whatever reason, the Bond film that starts with 007 scooping up Blofeld with a helicopter and depositing him into a smokestack has acquired the reputation of being a “grounded” installment in the series. If you take that gesture as a farewell to the “Star Wars”-inspired silliness of “Moonraker," it’s possible to regard the next two hours of intermittent excitement as a course correction. Unfortunately, Moore just wasn’t credible as a hard-nosed Bond; he wasn’t that far off from Dean Martin or James Coburn in their respective secret agent parodies.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/20_unforgettable_moments_in_live_television_history_102623/s1__35260103'>20 unforgettable moments in live television history</a></p>

"For Your Eyes Only"

For whatever reason, the Bond film that starts with 007 scooping up Blofeld with a helicopter and depositing him into a smokestack has acquired the reputation of being a “grounded” installment in the series. If you take that gesture as a farewell to the “Star Wars”-inspired silliness of “Moonraker," it’s possible to regard the next two hours of intermittent excitement as a course correction. Unfortunately, Moore just wasn’t credible as a hard-nosed Bond; he wasn’t that far off from Dean Martin or James Coburn in their respective secret agent parodies.

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<p>A noble attempt to do a down-and-dirty Bond ala Fleming, but the franchise couldn’t shake loose of its addiction to spectacle. Dalton’s 007 seeks revenge against the scumbag drug dealer (Robert Davi) who murdered Felix Leiter’s wife and <em>partially </em>fed his CIA agent buddy to a tiger shark. Dalton is the right Bond for this ruthless job, and Carey Lowell is every bit his equal as the CIA informant who goes globetrotting with him. But longtime house director John Glen can’t maintain a consistent tone. It’s a slightly above-average Bond film that could’ve been so much more. </p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"License to Kill"

A noble attempt to do a down-and-dirty Bond ala Fleming, but the franchise couldn’t shake loose of its addiction to spectacle. Dalton’s 007 seeks revenge against the scumbag drug dealer (Robert Davi) who murdered Felix Leiter’s wife and partially  fed his CIA agent buddy to a tiger shark. Dalton is the right Bond for this ruthless job, and Carey Lowell is every bit his equal as the CIA informant who goes globetrotting with him. But longtime house director John Glen can’t maintain a consistent tone. It’s a slightly above-average Bond film that could’ve been so much more. 

<p>It’s telling that the most iconic image in the first James Bond film is that of Ursula Andress’ Honey Ryder emerging from the sea in her white bikini. Sean Connery was clearly born to play 007 from frame one, but this is more of a production than a story — a pioneering piece of bet-hedging cinema that exists to get to the second movie. As such, it’s probably one of the most influential movies ever made. It’s fine. But you’ll want to throw on “From Russia with Love” the minute it’s finished.</p>

"Dr. No"

It’s telling that the most iconic image in the first James Bond film is that of Ursula Andress’ Honey Ryder emerging from the sea in her white bikini. Sean Connery was clearly born to play 007 from frame one, but this is more of a production than a story — a pioneering piece of bet-hedging cinema that exists to get to the second movie. As such, it’s probably one of the most influential movies ever made. It’s fine. But you’ll want to throw on “From Russia with Love” the minute it’s finished.

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<p>“You were expecting someone else,” asked Pierce Brosnan in the sleek teaser for “GoldenEye." Bond fans had actually been expecting him for close to a decade, but "Cubby" Broccoli blanched at a television star taking over the larger-than-life role in 1986 after Moore, a former television star, exited the franchise. Better late than never — for one film, at least. The series’ Mr. Fix-It, Martin Campbell, delivered an extravagantly entertaining (if somewhat bloated) film that made Brosnan the movie star he was always destined to be. Famke Janssen’s Xenia Onatopp, with her midsection crushing thighs, is a ridiculously sexy villainess. They should’ve made her the new Blofeld.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"GoldenEye"

“You were expecting someone else,” asked Pierce Brosnan in the sleek teaser for “GoldenEye." Bond fans had actually been expecting him for close to a decade, but "Cubby" Broccoli blanched at a television star taking over the larger-than-life role in 1986 after Moore, a former television star, exited the franchise. Better late than never — for one film, at least. The series’ Mr. Fix-It, Martin Campbell, delivered an extravagantly entertaining (if somewhat bloated) film that made Brosnan the movie star he was always destined to be. Famke Janssen’s Xenia Onatopp, with her midsection crushing thighs, is a ridiculously sexy villainess. They should’ve made her the new Blofeld.

<p>Sam Mendes brought Best Picture-winning pedigree to the Bond franchise with this hugely consequential installment in the Daniel Craig cycle. Some purists loathed the Bond family backstory getting dragged into the mix, but it was less about exploring the character’s upbringing than considering his iconography; Monty Norman’s theme kicking in right as the Aston Martin blows up (off Craig’s outraged reaction) was the most meta moment in a Bond movie prior to “Spectre” — and it actually worked here! Mendes’ affection for “Live and Let Die” surfaces here and there to lighten up the otherwise dour mood. Adele’s theme song is the series’ best since “A View to a Kill." </p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/20_country_songs_that_will_definitely_make_you_cry_112823/s1__37736863'>20 country songs that will definitely make you cry</a></p>

"Skyfall"

Sam Mendes brought Best Picture-winning pedigree to the Bond franchise with this hugely consequential installment in the Daniel Craig cycle. Some purists loathed the Bond family backstory getting dragged into the mix, but it was less about exploring the character’s upbringing than considering his iconography; Monty Norman’s theme kicking in right as the Aston Martin blows up (off Craig’s outraged reaction) was the most meta moment in a Bond movie prior to “Spectre” — and it actually worked here! Mendes’ affection for “Live and Let Die” surfaces here and there to lighten up the otherwise dour mood. Adele’s theme song is the series’ best since “A View to a Kill." 

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<p>The most underrated Bond film also happens to star the franchise’s most underappreciated 007. Timothy Dalton lacked the brash novelty of Connery or the familiarity of Moore when he took over the role in 1987. He possessed the unremarkable physical bearing of the character initially envisioned by Fleming, and he might’ve pulled off a gritty, Craig-like reboot had the producers been willing to go against the blockbuster grain in the era of Stallone and Schwarzenegger. This is a big movie with a sweeping Barry score (his last for the series); the plot is hopelessly convoluted, but it’s at least more serious and somewhat grounded compared to most of the Moore films. It’s a hugely enjoyable film, and it’s to Dalton’s credit that his underplayed Bond doesn’t get lost in the ruckus.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"The Living Daylights"

The most underrated Bond film also happens to star the franchise’s most underappreciated 007. Timothy Dalton lacked the brash novelty of Connery or the familiarity of Moore when he took over the role in 1987. He possessed the unremarkable physical bearing of the character initially envisioned by Fleming, and he might’ve pulled off a gritty, Craig-like reboot had the producers been willing to go against the blockbuster grain in the era of Stallone and Schwarzenegger. This is a big movie with a sweeping Barry score (his last for the series); the plot is hopelessly convoluted, but it’s at least more serious and somewhat grounded compared to most of the Moore films. It’s a hugely enjoyable film, and it’s to Dalton’s credit that his underplayed Bond doesn’t get lost in the ruckus.

<p>Bond's Daniel Craig Cycle comes to a close in classic 007 fashion. It's sexy, stylish, funny, intermittently thrilling and hugely convoluted. Bond's tragic past once again rears its head and destroys any opportunity of moving forward with Madeleine (Léa Seydoux). Five years later, Bond's called back into action when a deadly, nanobot-borne virus threatens to, you guessed it, wipe out the world. Rami Malek is properly annoying as terrorist mastermind Lyutsifer Safin, and there's a Cuban set-piece that ranks with the series' best. But it's all a little draggier than it ought to be. The film's final act will be forever divisive, more likely to resonate for those who prefer "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" to "Goldfinger".</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/the_25_best_pulpy_movies_010624/s1__39009308'>The 25 best pulpy movies</a></p>

"No Time to Die"

Bond's Daniel Craig Cycle comes to a close in classic 007 fashion. It's sexy, stylish, funny, intermittently thrilling and hugely convoluted. Bond's tragic past once again rears its head and destroys any opportunity of moving forward with Madeleine (Léa Seydoux). Five years later, Bond's called back into action when a deadly, nanobot-borne virus threatens to, you guessed it, wipe out the world. Rami Malek is properly annoying as terrorist mastermind Lyutsifer Safin, and there's a Cuban set-piece that ranks with the series' best. But it's all a little draggier than it ought to be. The film's final act will be forever divisive, more likely to resonate for those who prefer "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" to "Goldfinger".

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<p>Sean Connery missed his chance to do “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” when the Bond producers balked at the location difficulties that film presented, and he opted to make this Roald Dahl-scripted, Japan-set extravaganza instead. Donald Pleasance makes for a fabulously menacing Ernst Stavro Blofeld, whose vast, volcanic lair (designed by the great Ken Adam) should look <em>very </em>familiar to fans of “The Incredibles." The wild gadgets are more deftly integrated into the fabric of this film than they were in the ludicrous “Thunderball," making this the first official course correction in the series’ history. John Barry’s gorgeously orchestrated title track (sung by Nancy Sinatra) is a top five Bond theme.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"You Only Live Twice"

Sean Connery missed his chance to do “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” when the Bond producers balked at the location difficulties that film presented, and he opted to make this Roald Dahl-scripted, Japan-set extravaganza instead. Donald Pleasance makes for a fabulously menacing Ernst Stavro Blofeld, whose vast, volcanic lair (designed by the great Ken Adam) should look very  familiar to fans of “The Incredibles." The wild gadgets are more deftly integrated into the fabric of this film than they were in the ludicrous “Thunderball," making this the first official course correction in the series’ history. John Barry’s gorgeously orchestrated title track (sung by Nancy Sinatra) is a top five Bond theme.

<p>Younger viewers might need a moment to adjust to Marvin Hamlisch’s disco-inflected score during the opening ski-slope set piece, but Carly Simon’s all-timer of a Bond theme, “Nobody Does It Better” (complemented by what might be Maurice Binder’s most inventive title sequence), casts a timeless spell over the film that even the sight of 007 driving a Lotus Esprit underwater can’t break. This is by far Roger Moore’s top Bond effort. Barbara Bach is stunning as the vengeful Agent XXX, Richard Kiel makes his first appearance as the steel-toothed henchman Jaws and Ken Adam’s sets (particularly Stromberg’s massive supertanker lair) are some of the most spectacular ever constructed.</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/the_most_memorable_tv_show_catchphrases_102623/s1__29638418'>The most memorable TV show catchphrases</a></p>

"The Spy Who Loved Me"

Younger viewers might need a moment to adjust to Marvin Hamlisch’s disco-inflected score during the opening ski-slope set piece, but Carly Simon’s all-timer of a Bond theme, “Nobody Does It Better” (complemented by what might be Maurice Binder’s most inventive title sequence), casts a timeless spell over the film that even the sight of 007 driving a Lotus Esprit underwater can’t break. This is by far Roger Moore’s top Bond effort. Barbara Bach is stunning as the vengeful Agent XXX, Richard Kiel makes his first appearance as the steel-toothed henchman Jaws and Ken Adam’s sets (particularly Stromberg’s massive supertanker lair) are some of the most spectacular ever constructed.

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<p>The Bond franchise had once again collapsed into unrealistic, gadget-heavy silliness with “Die Another Day," forcing the producers into a tonal revamp that saved the series. Daniel Craig’s brooding bruiser drew comparisons to the popular Jason Bourne series, but this being Bond, he was allowed to slow down, enjoy a martini and generally exhibit the kinds of human qualities denied Matt Damon’s character. Audiences fell hard for Craig, while director Martin Campbell delivered the action goods and then some. Eva Green’s Vesper Lynd was the most fleshed-out Bond girl since Diana Rigg’s Tracy; alas, it didn’t end well for her either.</p><p><a href='https://www.msn.com/en-us/community/channel/vid-cj9pqbr0vn9in2b6ddcd8sfgpfq6x6utp44fssrv6mc2gtybw0us'>Follow us on MSN to see more of our exclusive entertainment content.</a></p>

"Casino Royale"

The Bond franchise had once again collapsed into unrealistic, gadget-heavy silliness with “Die Another Day," forcing the producers into a tonal revamp that saved the series. Daniel Craig’s brooding bruiser drew comparisons to the popular Jason Bourne series, but this being Bond, he was allowed to slow down, enjoy a martini and generally exhibit the kinds of human qualities denied Matt Damon’s character. Audiences fell hard for Craig, while director Martin Campbell delivered the action goods and then some. Eva Green’s Vesper Lynd was the most fleshed-out Bond girl since Diana Rigg’s Tracy; alas, it didn’t end well for her either.

<p>The James Bond movie template was set with this Guy Hamilton-directed classic: the splashy opening action set piece followed by a knockout of a theme song (none better than Shirley Bassey’s iconic warbling here), the obligatory trip to Q’s gadget workshop (where Bond typically gets his tricked-out wheels for the movie) and an emphasis on cheeky, quip-heavy humor. Honor Blackman’s audaciously named Pūssy Galore is the most famous Bond girl of them all, while Harold Sakata’s sinisterly silent Oddjob, with his razor-brimmed bowler hat, makes for a memorably formidable henchman. The franchise was already a hit, but it became a pop cultural institution with “Goldfinger."</p><p>You may also like: <a href='https://www.yardbarker.com/entertainment/articles/21st_century_tv_shows_canceled_too_soon_010624/s1__38890714'>21st-century TV shows canceled too soon</a></p>

"Goldfinger"

The James Bond movie template was set with this Guy Hamilton-directed classic: the splashy opening action set piece followed by a knockout of a theme song (none better than Shirley Bassey’s iconic warbling here), the obligatory trip to Q’s gadget workshop (where Bond typically gets his tricked-out wheels for the movie) and an emphasis on cheeky, quip-heavy humor. Honor Blackman’s audaciously named Pūssy Galore is the most famous Bond girl of them all, while Harold Sakata’s sinisterly silent Oddjob, with his razor-brimmed bowler hat, makes for a memorably formidable henchman. The franchise was already a hit, but it became a pop cultural institution with “Goldfinger."

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<p>This Terence Young-directed gem is the closest any Bond film has come to capturing the tough, unsentimental spirit of Ian Fleming’s novels. Even the gadgets — notably Bond’s multi-purpose attaché case — are plausible. It also boasts the most coherent plot of the series and two of the franchise’s most memorable fights: the outlandish (and sexist in nature) Martine Beswick/Aliza Gur gypsy clash and a ferociously realistic train-bound brawl between Connery and Robert Shaw’s bruiser of a henchman. If you’re looking for a “grounded” Bond movie, this is the closest you’ll get. </p>

"From Russia with Love"

This Terence Young-directed gem is the closest any Bond film has come to capturing the tough, unsentimental spirit of Ian Fleming’s novels. Even the gadgets — notably Bond’s multi-purpose attaché case — are plausible. It also boasts the most coherent plot of the series and two of the franchise’s most memorable fights: the outlandish (and sexist in nature) Martine Beswick/Aliza Gur gypsy clash and a ferociously realistic train-bound brawl between Connery and Robert Shaw’s bruiser of a henchman. If you’re looking for a “grounded” Bond movie, this is the closest you’ll get. 

<p>The broken heart of the James Bond franchise features the best ever Bond girl (Diana Rigg), the best John Barry score, the best story, some of the best, <a href="http://extension765.com/soderblogh/2-most-irrelevant-no-1" rel="noopener noreferrer">most meticulously constructed action set pieces</a> ever put to film and…George Lazenby. Taking over for Sean Connery was a thankless task to begin with, and screenwriter Richard Maibaum didn’t do Lazenby any favors in his first (and last) Bond performance by writing him a very Connery-ish script. But could Connery have projected the vulnerability necessary to put over the tragic romance with Rigg’s Tracy? It’s a shame this project didn’t arrive earlier in Connery’s tenure, when he wasn’t checked out. Then this wouldn’t be a debate. Not even close.</p>

"On Her Majesty's Secret Service"

The broken heart of the James Bond franchise features the best ever Bond girl (Diana Rigg), the best John Barry score, the best story, some of the best, most meticulously constructed action set pieces ever put to film and…George Lazenby. Taking over for Sean Connery was a thankless task to begin with, and screenwriter Richard Maibaum didn’t do Lazenby any favors in his first (and last) Bond performance by writing him a very Connery-ish script. But could Connery have projected the vulnerability necessary to put over the tragic romance with Rigg’s Tracy? It’s a shame this project didn’t arrive earlier in Connery’s tenure, when he wasn’t checked out. Then this wouldn’t be a debate. Not even close.

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Screen Rant

Players review: sleazy netflix rom-com celebrates the terrible side of dating culture.

As far as rom-coms go, Players barks up a creative tree, but this story is about as trashy as they come.

  • Players fails to critique dating culture, instead celebrating and glamorizing shallow hook-up schemes.
  • The film lacks depth and realistic characterizations, focusing on unfunny humor rather than quality storytelling.
  • Despite the efforts of the talented cast, Players is a forgettable rom-com that disappoints with its rushed and undeserved ending.

It’s Valentine’s Day Week, and there are plenty of old and new rom-coms to look forward to, with Netflix also releasing its latest romantic comedy, Players , starring Jane the Virgin's Gina Rodriguez. Written by Whit Anderson and directed by Trish Sie, the story sees Mack (Rodriguez), an outgoing sports reporter, who develops schemes to land one-night stands. When she starts falling in love with her latest play, Mack intends to turn her latest interest into a long-term relationship. As far as rom-coms go, Players barks up a creative tree, but this story is about as trashy as they come.

Netflix Players temp Logo Poster

Players is a 2024 romantic comedy movie created for Netflix by director Trish Sie. Mack, a sportswriter in New York City, leads a crew with her best friend, Adam, as they run plays to help one another hook up with various people. However, when Mack begins to break one of the group's cardinal rules - don't fall in love with a mark - she shifts gears and learns the rules of real love.

  • Gina Rodriguez is her usual charming self.
  • Anderson's script never fully analyzes its central character.
  • The film celebrates sleazy dating culture over critiquing it.
  • The on-screen friendships seem unrealistic and contrived.
  • The ending of Players is rushed and completely unearned.

Mack has spent her post-college years devising dating plays so that she and her friends could hook up with whoever they set their sights on. When a war correspondent, Nick ( Lucifer actor Tom Ellis ), begins working at her dying newspaper, Mack turns on her tricks with the help of her crew, including Adam ( New Girl's Damon Wayans Jr. ), Brannagan (Augustus Prew), Little (Joel Courtney), and Ashley (Liza Koshy). This hook-up scheme is at the center of their friendships, which is where the first big issue of this film surfaces.

Players Doesn't Know How To Incorporate Realistic Dating Culture Criticisms

It's difficult to support a film whose characters’ entire personalities revolve around hooking up with other people. Even in the real world, people are more complex and interesting than whatever shallow part of humanity this script wants to highlight. Whatever feminist view or girl power the story also attempts to celebrate through Mack, who doesn’t seem to have any female friends, completely fails. Instead, the film is a wasted opportunity to critique the dating world. With the internet now being a hub for podcasters to share their grievances on the topic, Players is a poor excuse for a dating/hook-up story.

Towards the middle of Players , we come to understand that Mack lost her parents, which may explain her rambunctious appetite for hooking up with no strings attached. But this is a Netflix rom-com where Anderson finds no need to dive deep into Mack’s personality or psychological state that would clue the audience in on her actions. Never mind that even her reasoning for wanting to finally try a relationship is half-assed and silly, to say the least. Humor and ridiculous scheming to trick people into relationships is the priority of this messy script.

With the internet now being a hub for podcasters to share their grievances on the topic, Players is a poor excuse for a dating/hook-up story.

There’s a point when Mack quickly learns that turning a hookup into a quality relationship when it’s built off of lies is nearly impossible. For example, when Mack and Nick join Adam and Claire (Ego Nwodim) on a double date, the conversation reveals that Mack and Nick have very little, if anything at all, in common. It begs the question of why Mack is even interested in Nick in the first place. This brief moment highlights the problems with dating culture, in that people no longer seem interested in important commonalities or virtues, but that’s the extent of it.

The Cast Tries Their Best, But Players Is A Rom-Com You'll Want To Forget

Gina Rodriguez and Damon Wayans Jr ride bikes in Players

Moments like this contrived dinner date is exactly what happens when a script caters to comedy, albeit unfunny humor at that, over quality characterizations and storytelling. It leans into unrealistic territory, and we’re unfortunately left with a trashy story that very few will like. Not even the ever-charming Gina Rodriguez and confident Damon Wayans Jr. could save this film. And thanks to an ending that is so undeserved, I wouldn’t be surprised if Players actually ended up turning everyone’s sweet Valentine’s Day sour.

Players (2024)

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James Bond 007 Movies By Ratings

  • Movies or TV
  • IMDb Rating
  • In Theaters
  • Release Year

1. Casino Royale (2006)

PG-13 | 144 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

After earning 00 status and a licence to kill, secret agent James Bond sets out on his first mission as 007. Bond must defeat a private banker funding terrorists in a high-stakes game of poker at Casino Royale, Montenegro.

Director: Martin Campbell | Stars: Daniel Craig , Eva Green , Judi Dench , Jeffrey Wright

Votes: 689,887 | Gross: $167.45M

2. No Time to Die (2021)

PG-13 | 163 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond has left active service. His peace is short-lived when Felix Leiter, an old friend from the CIA, turns up asking for help, leading Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain armed with dangerous new technology.

Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga | Stars: Daniel Craig , Ana de Armas , Rami Malek , Léa Seydoux

Votes: 439,987 | Gross: $160.87M

3. Goldfinger (1964)

PG | 110 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

While investigating a gold magnate's smuggling, James Bond uncovers a plot to contaminate the Fort Knox gold reserve.

Director: Guy Hamilton | Stars: Sean Connery , Gert Fröbe , Honor Blackman , Shirley Eaton

Votes: 201,156 | Gross: $51.08M

4. Skyfall (2012)

PG-13 | 143 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond's loyalty to M is tested when her past comes back to haunt her. When MI6 comes under attack, 007 must track down and destroy the threat, no matter how personal the cost.

Director: Sam Mendes | Stars: Daniel Craig , Javier Bardem , Naomie Harris , Judi Dench

Votes: 726,741 | Gross: $304.36M

5. From Russia with Love (1963)

PG | 115 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond willingly falls into an assassination plot involving a naive Russian beauty in order to retrieve a Soviet encryption device that was stolen by S.P.E.C.T.R.E.

Director: Terence Young | Stars: Sean Connery , Robert Shaw , Lotte Lenya , Daniela Bianchi

Votes: 144,270 | Gross: $24.80M

6. Dr. No (1962)

A resourceful British government agent seeks answers in a case involving the disappearance of a colleague and the disruption of the American space program.

Director: Terence Young | Stars: Sean Connery , Ursula Andress , Bernard Lee , Joseph Wiseman

Votes: 178,200 | Gross: $16.07M

7. GoldenEye (1995)

PG-13 | 130 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

Years after a friend and fellow 00 agent is killed on a joint mission, a secret space based weapons program known as "GoldenEye" is stolen. James Bond is assigned to stop a Russian crime syndicate from using the weapon.

Director: Martin Campbell | Stars: Pierce Brosnan , Sean Bean , Izabella Scorupco , Famke Janssen

Votes: 268,878 | Gross: $106.60M

8. The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

PG | 125 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond investigates the hijacking of British and Russian submarines carrying nuclear warheads, with the help of a K.G.B. agent whose lover he killed.

Director: Lewis Gilbert | Stars: Roger Moore , Barbara Bach , Curd Jürgens , Richard Kiel

Votes: 115,442 | Gross: $46.80M

9. Thunderball (1965)

PG | 130 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond heads to the Bahamas to recover two nuclear warheads stolen by S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Agent Emilio Largo in an international extortion scheme.

Director: Terence Young | Stars: Sean Connery , Claudine Auger , Adolfo Celi , Luciana Paluzzi

Votes: 126,247 | Gross: $63.60M

10. You Only Live Twice (1967)

PG | 117 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond and the Japanese Secret Service must find and stop the true culprit of a series of space hijackings, before war is provoked between Russia and the United States.

Director: Lewis Gilbert | Stars: Sean Connery , Akiko Wakabayashi , Mie Hama , Tetsurô Tanba

Votes: 116,735 | Gross: $43.08M

11. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)

PG | 142 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

British agent James Bond goes undercover to pursue the villainous Ernst Stavro Blofeld, who is planning to hold the world to ransom.

Director: Peter R. Hunt | Stars: George Lazenby , Diana Rigg , Telly Savalas , Gabriele Ferzetti

Votes: 98,625 | Gross: $22.80M

12. Live and Let Die (1973)

PG | 121 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond is sent to stop a diabolically brilliant heroin magnate armed with a complex organisation and a reliable psychic tarot card reader.

Director: Guy Hamilton | Stars: Roger Moore , Yaphet Kotto , Jane Seymour , Clifton James

Votes: 114,681 | Gross: $35.38M

13. For Your Eyes Only (1981)

PG | 127 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

Secret service agent James Bond is assigned to find a missing British vessel equipped with a weapons encryption device and prevent it from falling into enemy hands.

Director: John Glen | Stars: Roger Moore , Carole Bouquet , Topol , Lynn-Holly Johnson

Votes: 107,568 | Gross: $62.30M

14. The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)

James Bond is targeted by the world's most expensive assassin, while he attempts to recover sensitive solar cell technology that is being sold to the highest bidder.

Director: Guy Hamilton | Stars: Roger Moore , Christopher Lee , Britt Ekland , Maud Adams

Votes: 112,335 | Gross: $20.97M

15. Quantum of Solace (2008)

PG-13 | 106 min | Action, Adventure, Mystery

James Bond descends into mystery as he tries to stop a mysterious organisation from eliminating a country's most valuable resource.

Director: Marc Forster | Stars: Daniel Craig , Olga Kurylenko , Mathieu Amalric , Judi Dench

Votes: 468,281 | Gross: $168.37M

16. Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

PG | 120 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

A diamond smuggling investigation leads James Bond to Las Vegas where he uncovers an evil plot involving a rich business tycoon.

Director: Guy Hamilton | Stars: Sean Connery , Jill St. John , Charles Gray , Lana Wood

Votes: 113,374 | Gross: $43.82M

17. The Living Daylights (1987)

James Bond is sent to investigate a KGB policy to kill all enemy spies, and uncovers an arms deal that potentially has major global ramifications.

Director: John Glen | Stars: Timothy Dalton , Maryam d'Abo , Jeroen Krabbé , Joe Don Baker

Votes: 105,156 | Gross: $51.19M

18. Octopussy (1983)

PG | 131 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

A fake Fabergé egg recovered from the body of a fellow British secret service agent leads James Bond to uncover a jewel smuggling operation headed by the mysterious Octopussy, and a plot to blow up a NATO air base.

Director: John Glen | Stars: Roger Moore , Maud Adams , Louis Jourdan , Kristina Wayborn

Votes: 112,234 | Gross: $67.90M

19. Licence to Kill (1989)

PG-13 | 133 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

A vengeful James Bond goes rogue to infiltrate and take down the organization of a drug lord who has murdered his friend's new wife and left him near death.

Director: John Glen | Stars: Timothy Dalton , Robert Davi , Carey Lowell , Talisa Soto

Votes: 111,281 | Gross: $34.67M

20. Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

PG-13 | 119 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond sets out to stop a media mogul's plan to induce war between China and the UK in order to obtain exclusive global media coverage.

Director: Roger Spottiswoode | Stars: Pierce Brosnan , Jonathan Pryce , Michelle Yeoh , Teri Hatcher

Votes: 203,682 | Gross: $125.33M

21. The World Is Not Enough (1999)

PG-13 | 128 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

James Bond uncovers a nuclear plot while protecting an oil heiress from her former kidnapper, an international terrorist who can't feel pain.

Director: Michael Apted | Stars: Pierce Brosnan , Sophie Marceau , Robert Carlyle , Denise Richards

Votes: 209,035 | Gross: $126.94M

22. A View to a Kill (1985)

The recovery of a microchip from the body of a fellow British secret agent leads James Bond to a mad industrialist scheming to cause massive destruction.

Director: John Glen | Stars: Roger Moore , Christopher Walken , Tanya Roberts , Grace Jones

Votes: 104,128 | Gross: $50.33M

23. Moonraker (1979)

PG | 126 min | Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi

James Bond investigates the mid-air theft of a space shuttle, and discovers a plot to commit global genocide.

Director: Lewis Gilbert | Stars: Roger Moore , Lois Chiles , Michael Lonsdale , Richard Kiel

Votes: 108,036 | Gross: $70.31M

24. Die Another Day (2002)

James Bond is sent to investigate the connection between a North Korean terrorist and a diamond mogul, who is funding the development of an international space weapon.

Director: Lee Tamahori | Stars: Pierce Brosnan , Halle Berry , Rosamund Pike , Toby Stephens

Votes: 228,124 | Gross: $160.94M

25. Spectre (I) (2015)

PG-13 | 148 min | Action, Adventure, Thriller

A cryptic message from James Bond's past sends him on a trail to uncover the existence of a sinister organisation named SPECTRE. With a new threat dawning, Bond learns the terrible truth about the author of all his pain in his most recent missions.

Director: Sam Mendes | Stars: Daniel Craig , Christoph Waltz , Léa Seydoux , Ralph Fiennes

Votes: 463,130 | Gross: $200.07M

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COMMENTS

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    Many characters are shot and/or. Parents need to know that No Time to Die is the 25th James Bond movie and the fifth with Daniel Craig in the lead role. It's more epic, tragic, and emotional than is typical for the franchise, and, despite its length (163 minutes), it's worth seeing for teen and adult fans. Expect the usual guns and shooting,….

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