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Difference Between Article and Journal

article-vs-journal

On the contrary, Journal is a periodical publication in a specific field of study, which is often reviewed by experts in the concerned area. Journal publications are regarded as one of the highly honoured forms of publications, because of its high standards in reviewing and publishing.

Come let’s discuss the differences between article and journal.

Content: Article Vs Journal

Comparison chart, definition of article.

The article implies an independently written composition, usually short and precise, which is traditionally included in the newspaper, magazines, websites, journals, etc. It is written for a large audience in an entertaining manner, so as to grab and retain their interest and attention. The name of the person who wrote the article is always mentioned.

An article not just integrates facts, but the thoughts and opinions of the writer and experts, and balanced arguments are also included. A well-drafted article often brings out topics of interest into the limelight.

An article may cover fascinating stories, reported speech, information, suggestions and other descriptions. It can also describe any event, experience, person or anything else. Articles are classified on the basis of need or preference:

  • News Articles : Articles containing breaking news, information, happenings, events of public interest, what will happen in the near future or a trending topic. It may contain photographs, charts, interviews, debates, etc. Its objective is to report on when, how, where and why the event took place and who is involved in it.
  • Feature Articles : One that is written creatively and descriptively so as to entertain, engage and influence the reader. The article can be based on anything, i.e. from people to place or from event to experience.
  • Editorial Articles : These are commonly found in newspapers and magazines, which often showcase a new outlook or opinion, on a current issue. It often expresses a distinctive angle or approach about someone or something and provokes the reader to think that way.
  • How-to Articles : Such articles are instructional in the sense that they offer complete guidelines on how-to-do something.
  • Marketing Articles : A short piece of writing, which is actually an advertisement, written to catch the attention of the reader towards the company’s product or service.
  • Question-Answer Articles : As the name suggest, these articles are in question-answer format, based upon an interview with the famous personality. It does not contain an introductory paragraph.
  • Profile Articles : Profile articles are all about a specific person, which requires research and interview, to gather relevant information about that person.

Definition of Journal

Journal can be defined as a professional or academic publication, which features a number of educational articles, written by researchers, experts or someone having academic qualifications in the concerned subject, which presents original and new research, book reviews, feedback, review articles and so forth. It includes references and targets academic audience only.

A journal is always on a specific discipline, that targets a particular group of people, typically students pursuing that discipline and not the general public. It must be noted, the journals are usually peer-reviewed (refereed) and so they undergo an extensive editorial process. However, all the journals are not peer-reviewed.

They focus on current developments in the field of study. It is available in both offline (printed form) and online mode. One can use journal articles for the purpose of research as they are authoritative, up to date, topic-specific and understandable.

Journals are published periodically, i.e. weekly, bi-monthly, monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually. Each copy is termed as an issue, and a set of issues are called volume.

Key Differences Between Article and Journal

The points given below are noteworthy so far as the difference between article and journal is concerned:

  • An article is a written composition on a topic of interest, which forms a separate part of a book, magazine or newspaper. On the other hand, Journal is a type of magazine which contains articles and other descriptions on a particular discipline or professional activities.
  • While the article is a work of literature, the journal is a form of publication.
  • An article is non-fictional and informative in nature. As against, the journal is educational and academic.
  • The article can include news, stories, information, facts or writer’s experience, opinion, suggestion, facts, etc. Conversely, a journal contains articles, book reviews, editorial content, achievements, feedback, recent developments in the field of study and many more.
  • An article is written on the topic of interest of the writer or any burning issue. In contrast, a journal is all about the specific field of study or professional course and developments thereon.
  • The main objective of writing an article is to influence the reader and urging them to think. On the flip side, a journal aims to provide relevant information relating to the professional course.

In a nutshell, an article differs from a journal in the sense that an article is a written composition, which is just a small part of the journal, while the journal is itself a publication containing a number of articles and other relevant material.

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Answered By: Laura Marek Last Updated: Dec 07, 2023     Views: 1073

An article is a nonfiction writing that forms an independent part of a publication like a journal.

A journal is a collection of articles and is published periodically throughout the year.  Examples would be the  Journal of the American Medical Association  or American Journal of Public Health .  You would find articles in a journal.

Let's take a look at a citation to see where the article title and journal name appear:

Wright, C.V., Perez, S., Johnson, D.M. (2010). The mediating role of empowerment for African American women experiencing intimate partner violence.  Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 2 (4), 266-272. 

The article is:  The mediating role of empowerment for African American women experiencing intimate partner violence.

The journal it is published in is:  Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy

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Answered By: Rachel Whittingham Last Updated: Jan 09, 2019     Views: 4244

A "journal article title" is what each article, within a journal, has been titled by its author.

Journals are similar to magazines, except that they contain academic, scholarly content that generally has been reviewed by experts in the content field around which the journal focuses, i.e. "peer-reviewed journal." A journal title is what the journal itself is called.

So, for example, our library gets the journal, Social Work & Christianity (this is the title of the journal).  Within the Spring 2012 issue of this journal, I'm looking at an article titled "Is that Church on Fire? A Unique Moment of Opportunity for Social Work Leadership" written by Diana R. Garland.

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Answered By: Elizabeth Galoozis (she/her) Last Updated: Sep 27, 2019     Views: 74159

In assignments, or on the library website, you’ve probably seen the three words “article,” “journal,” and “database.” How do they relate to each other, and how do they relate to searching for sources?

When you search in the libraries’ home page, you’re searching across several databases , including collections of books, e-books, and films, along with individual databases  - for example, JSTOR or ProQuest Research Library. Each database includes sources such as articles, government documents, and many more. You can search for databases by name using the “Databases” search on the libraries’ home page.

One of the most common types of sources is a journal . This word may be used interchangeably in some places with periodical or serial , but basically a journal is a publication that comes out in issues on a regular basis - for example, four times a year. An example is Feminist Economics:

An issue of a journal contains individual articles . These are probably what you’re used to finding when you search for sources in the libraries or online, but you usually find them detached from their particular journal issue.

You can search for journals by title using the “Journals” search on the libraries’ home page.

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Home » Education » What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

The main difference between article and journal is that an article is much shorter than a journal .

When you are writing an academic paper or conducting a research study, you will need to consult various articles and journals. An article is a written composition in prose, usually nonfiction, on a specific topic, forming an independent part of a publication. A journal, on the other hand, is a collection of scholarly articles. We sometimes use the word journal article to refer to an individual article in a journal.

Key Areas Covered

1.  What is an Article      – Definition, Features 2.  What is a Journal      – Definition, Features 3.  What is the Difference Between Article and Journal     – Comparison of Key Differences

Difference Between Article and Journal - Comparison Summary

What is an Article

An article is a piece of writing that is included with others in a newspaper, magazine or other publication. It is a form of nonfiction that is prose. You can find articles in magazines, encyclopedias, journals, websites, newspapers or other publications; the content and the structure of an article may depend on the source. For example, an article can be an editorial, review, feature article, scholarly article, etc.

An article is much shorter than a book  – it can be as short as one or two paragraphs or as long as a few dozen pages. The main aim of an article is to inform the readers about a certain topic. However, they are written about very specific topics. Moreover, articles usually follow a heading and sub-headings format; this format makes readers understand the concepts dealt with in the article easily. Articles can also vary according to the type of information they present. Writers present these facts and information in an objective manner since their goal is to give out information, not to persuade the readers towards accepting their views.

Difference Between Article and Journal

A collection of academic or scholarly articles is known as a journal. Moreover, most journal articles have an abstract at the beginning and include extensive documentation at the end of the article.

What is a Journal

In academia, a journal is a scholarly publication. It’s a collection of articles written by researchers, professors and other experts. Journals typically focus on a specific discipline or field of study. For example, medical journals. Unlike magazines or newspapers, journals target an academic or technical audience, not general readers. Journals are available in print medium or as online publications.

Articles on a journal typically have original research and are peer-reviewed. Moreover, they focus on current developments in that field and cite related other works and contains bibliographies .

Main Difference - Article vs Journal

Furthermore, journals are usually published on a regular basis; for example, monthly, quarterly, annually, etc. Moreover, they have sequential numbers. Each journal is an issue; a set of issues makes a volume. In general, each year has a separate volume. 

Difference Between Article and Journal

An article is a written composition in prose, usually nonfiction, on a specific topic, forming an independent part of a publication, while a journal is a collection of scholarly articles written by researchers and other experts.

A journal article is several pages long, and a collection of these articles make up a journal. Moreover, an article is much shorter than a book, while a journal may be roughly the same length of a book.

A journal article typically has an abstract, headings and sub-headings and a bibliography at the end. Each journal is an issue; a set of issues makes a volume. In general, each year has a separate volume.

An article is a prose; usually, nonfiction, on a specific topic, forming an independent part of a publication. A journal, on the other hand, is a collection of scholarly articles. Hence, this is the difference between article and journal. 

1. “What’s a Journal?” University of Victoria, Available here . 2. “What Is a Journal Article? (What Is an Article?) .” SFU Library, Available here .

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1. “Lorem Ipsum Article” By Paraschivu.Florin – Own work (CC BY-SA 4.0) via Commons Wikimedia 2. “Academic Journal of Languages and Literature” By Ulker Ramazan – Own work (CC BY-SA 4.0) via Commons Wikimedia

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My students seem increasingly confused by the difference between journal title vs. article title.

what is the difference between article and journal title

Academics… does it bother you that the EBSCOhost “Cite” tool places its own name and a link to EBSCOhost into every every citation it generates? Students who uncritically copy-paste what the “Cite” tool spits out are filling their papers with advertisements.

Sometimes students will submit bibliography entries that repeat a title — either the journal or the article.  I assume they are using an online citation generator and I assume they’re not bothering to check its output.

What I had previously thought of as a random careless error now seems evidence of a paradigm shift. I’ve been teaching on the assumption that students are more familiar with the concept of a periodical that gains credibility by publishing themed (or at least chronologically grouped) issues over the years.

Not knowing the difference between a journal and an article in that journal would be like saying “The Kansas City Chiefs” is name of the quarterback for “The Kansas City Chiefs,” or not getting the difference between your car and the gas tank of your car.

My intention is not to complain about my students, but just to register this paradigm shift. It’s been 30 years since I’ve used a knife and hot wax to “cut” and “paste” text. A common icon for “save” is a floppy disk, which my undergraduates have probably never used. It now seems like “volume” and “issue” even the whole concept of a “periodical” are legacy concepts that are losing their meaning in a streaming-based digital world.

One student said that as long as he could give the URL, he didn’t know why he needed to bother with including any of the other information in a citation. I need to be mindful of how my teaching must change in order to meet the needs of students whose everyday life experience trains them to think this way.

I’ve never before really taken the time to ask my freshmen why they think I’m bothering to ask them to cite their sources. I’m trying to pay closer attention to how their reliance on the EBSCOhost “Cite” feature makes it harder for them to grasp what I want them to learn about citation.

To do that, before I ask my students to assemble a bibliography citation, I first asked them to practice finding specific details. After they found some articles, I asked them basic questions like:

1. What database did you use? (“EBSCOhost is not specific enough.) 2. What is the title of the journal? 3. What is the title of the article?

My point is not to complain about the students. Three weeks into the term of course there’s plenty they need to learn, it’s my job to teach them, and this early assignment helps me to assess what they already know.

Even though prompt #1 repeated (yet again) my in-class warning that “EBSCOhost is not specific enough,” I still got answers that included “EBSCOhost.” Some students repeated the same text for #2 and #3, suggesting they don’t understand the difference between a journal title and an article title.

In the slot where I asked for the title of the journal, one student seems to have entered the keywords she searched for.

I’ve started saying that the journal title is like the name of a TV series. The article title is like the name of a specific episode in that series. A volume number is like which season, and the name of the database would be like Netflix, Hulu, or Disney+.

I’m not sure that simile helps me get across the idea of “issue number,” but it’s a start.

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What is a journal article? (What is an article?)

Definitions.

Journal articles are shorter than books and written about very specific topics. 

A  journal  is a collection of articles (like a magazine) that is published regularly throughout the year. Journals present the most recent research, and journal articles are written by experts, for experts. They may be published in print or online formats, or both. 

Sample images

The front cover of a sample academic journal ( PORTAL: Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies ). Note that it includes a year, as well as "Vol." (for "Volume") and "No." (for "Number"). Because journals are published regularly, this information identifies different issues (like month and year on a popular magazine).

Cover of journal: Portal: Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies

A sample table of contents from the same academic journal, listing the articles that appear in this issue. (Note: When accessing journals online, articles are usually available as separate PDF documents.)

sample table of contents page from an academic journal, showing article titles and authors, as well as links for accessing each article.

A sample  article (first page) from the same academic journal:

the first page of a sample article from an academic journal, showing the title, authors, abstract, and keywords.

More information

Finding academic or scholarly journal articles Tips for searching for journal articles in the Library.

What is a scholarly (or peer-reviewed) journal ? For the differences between scholarly journals, magazines, and trade publications -- and when to use them.

Finding and evaluating sources Searching for and evaluating sources on the open web, with tips for evaluating all sources, including journals and journal articles.

What is peer review? What is a peer-reviewed journal? What peer review means and how to tell if a journal is peer-reviewed.

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Types of journal articles

It is helpful to familiarise yourself with the different types of articles published by journals. Although it may appear there are a large number of types of articles published due to the wide variety of names they are published under, most articles published are one of the following types; Original Research, Review Articles, Short reports or Letters, Case Studies, Methodologies.

Original Research:

This is the most common type of journal manuscript used to publish full reports of data from research. It may be called an  Original Article, Research Article, Research, or just  Article, depending on the journal. The Original Research format is suitable for many different fields and different types of studies. It includes full Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections.

Short reports or Letters:

These papers communicate brief reports of data from original research that editors believe will be interesting to many researchers, and that will likely stimulate further research in the field. As they are relatively short the format is useful for scientists with results that are time sensitive (for example, those in highly competitive or quickly-changing disciplines). This format often has strict length limits, so some experimental details may not be published until the authors write a full Original Research manuscript. These papers are also sometimes called Brief communications .

Review Articles:

Review Articles provide a comprehensive summary of research on a certain topic, and a perspective on the state of the field and where it is heading. They are often written by leaders in a particular discipline after invitation from the editors of a journal. Reviews are often widely read (for example, by researchers looking for a full introduction to a field) and highly cited. Reviews commonly cite approximately 100 primary research articles.

TIP: If you would like to write a Review but have not been invited by a journal, be sure to check the journal website as some journals to not consider unsolicited Reviews. If the website does not mention whether Reviews are commissioned it is wise to send a pre-submission enquiry letter to the journal editor to propose your Review manuscript before you spend time writing it.  

Case Studies:

These articles report specific instances of interesting phenomena. A goal of Case Studies is to make other researchers aware of the possibility that a specific phenomenon might occur. This type of study is often used in medicine to report the occurrence of previously unknown or emerging pathologies.

Methodologies or Methods

These articles present a new experimental method, test or procedure. The method described may either be completely new, or may offer a better version of an existing method. The article should describe a demonstrable advance on what is currently available.

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Core Differences

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14 Difference between Article and Journal (With Table)

What is the main difference between article and journal? An Article is a written piece of content that focus on a specific topic or subject matter while a journal is a publication comprising of multiple articles or research papers within a specific discipline.

Articles and journals are popular among individuals conducting research study or writing academic papers. The styles of writing between these publications are different. But many people use journal article term to refer to an individual article in a journal.

We recommend understanding the difference between these two entities before navigating in the world of scholarly publications. This blog post shed light on the disparities between articles and journals for better understanding.

Difference between Article and Journal with Table

What is an article.

An article is a concise written piece of content that conveys information, ideas, or opinions on a specific topic. Articles are designed to inform, educate, entertain, or persuade a wide audience. They are often found in newspapers, magazines, blogs, websites, and other media outlets.

Articles vary widely in style and purpose. Some are news articles, reporting current events and facts, while others are feature articles, offering in-depth analysis or storytelling. They can be authored by individuals, journalists, or subject matter experts.

Articles may or may not include citations and references, depending on their context and intended audience. Articles are not always subjected to rigorous peer review, making them more accessible for general readers.

They serve as valuable sources of information and commentary on a broad spectrum of topics, from news and entertainment to education and opinion.

What Is A Journal?

A journal is a specialized, scholarly publication that serves as a repository of original research, academic studies, and in-depth analyses within a particular field of knowledge. Journals are published periodically and they adhere to a structured format.

These publications are written by experts, researchers, and scholars in their respective fields, with the content organized into sections like abstracts, introductions, methods, results, discussions, and conclusions.

Journals often require rigorous peer review before acceptance, ensuring the quality, accuracy, and validity of the research presented. Journals are essential for the dissemination of new knowledge and the advancement of academic disciplines.

They provide a platform for researchers to share their findings, contribute to existing scholarship, and engage in scholarly discourse. Access to journal articles is often restricted, with subscriptions or institutional access required, reflecting their significance in academic and research.

Main Difference between Article and Journal

  • An article is a written piece found in books, magazines, or newspapers, typically non-fictional and informative. Conversely, a journal is a specialized magazine focused on a specific discipline or profession, containing articles, reviews, and academic content.
  • Articles encompass a wide range of topics and can include news, stories, opinions, and facts. In contrast, journals feature articles, book reviews, editorial content, and updates in the field of study.
  • While articles aim to influence and engage readers, journals primarily provide educational and professional information. Articles are often driven by writer’s interests or current issues, whereas journals are centered on a particular field or course of study.
  • Articles are individual written compositions that appear in books, magazines, or newspapers. They are typically non-fictional and serve to inform, entertain, or persuade. In contrast, journals are specialized publications, often focusing on a specific academic or professional field, containing scholarly articles, reviews, and research.
  • Articles cover a broad spectrum of topics, including news, stories, opinions, and factual information. In contrast, journals encompass articles, book reviews, editorials, achievements, feedback, and updates relevant to their respective fields.
  • While the primary purpose of an article is to engage and influence readers, encouraging thought and discussion, journals primarily exist to disseminate educational and academic content.
  • Articles are often driven by the writer’s interests or current events, whereas journals are dedicated to advancing knowledge within a specific domain or profession.

Similarities between Article and Journal

  • Both contain written content on various topics.
  • Both can be published in print or online formats.
  • Both may be authored by individuals or experts in the field.
  • Both serve as platforms for sharing knowledge and ideas.
  • Both aim to communicate and convey information to readers.

Final Thoughts from Experts

Articles and journals serve different purposes in the world of written content. Articles are shorter, versatile pieces often found in newspapers, magazines, or online sources. They can cover a wide range of topics and are accessible to a broad audience. Journals are specialized publications, emphasizing academic or professional content, backed by rigorous peer review. They are typically longer, structured, and focus on specific fields of study.

Articles aim to inform, entertain, or persuade with a diverse range of content, while journals prioritize scholarly research and educational information within their respective domains. Articles are more varied in authorship and review processes, whereas journals adhere to standardized formats and strict peer review.

In essence, articles are like quick reads for general knowledge, while journals are the deep dives into specialized expertise and research, catering to different information needs and audiences.

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  • How to cite a journal article in APA Style

How to Cite a Journal Article in APA Style | Format & Example

Published on November 5, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on January 17, 2024.

An APA Style citation for a journal article includes the author name(s), publication year, article title, journal name, volume and issue number, page range of the article, and a DOI (if available). Use the buttons below to explore the format, or try the free  APA Citation Generator to quickly and easily create citations.

Cite a journal article in APA Style now:

Table of contents, basic format for an apa journal citation, citing an article with an elocator or article number, citing unpublished journal articles, special issue of a journal, frequently asked questions about apa style citations.

The article title appears in plain text and sentence case, while the journal name is italicized and in title case (all major words capitalized).

When viewing a journal article online, the required information can usually be found on the access page.

APA journal source info

Linking to online journal articles

A DOI should always be used where available. Some databases do not list one, but you may still find one by looking for the same article on another database. You don’t need to include the name of the database in your citation.

If no DOI is available and the article was accessed through a database, do not include a URL.

If the article is not from a database, but from another website (e.g. the journal’s own website), you should ideally use a stable URL: this is often provided under a “share” button. Otherwise, copy the URL from your browser’s address bar.

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

Articles published only in PDF form may provide an article number or “eLocator” instead of a page range; in this case, include the number in your citation, preceded by the word “Article.”

When citing from an article that has not yet been formally published, the format varies depending on whether or not it has already been submitted to a journal. Note that different formats are used for unpublished dissertations and raw data .

Unpublished article

The text of an article which has not yet appeared online or in publication (i.e. which is only available directly from the author) should be cited as an “Unpublished manuscript.” The title is italicized and information about the author’s university is included if available:

Article submitted for publication

An article that has been submitted to a journal but not yet accepted is cited as a “Manuscript submitted for publication.” The title is italicized, and the name of the journal to which it was submitted is not included:

Article in press

An article that has been submitted and accepted for publication in a journal is cited as “in press.” Here, the name of the journal is included, university information is omitted, and “in press” is written in place of the year (both in the reference list and the in-text citation):

If you want to cite a special issue of a journal rather than a regular article, the name(s) of the editor(s) and the title of the issue appear in place of the author’s name and article title:

Note that if you want to cite an individual article from the special issue, it can just be cited in the basic format for journal articles.

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The AI-powered APA Citation Checker points out every error, tells you exactly what’s wrong, and explains how to fix it. Say goodbye to losing marks on your assignment!

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what is the difference between article and journal title

In an APA journal citation , if a DOI (digital object identifier) is available for an article, always include it.

If an article has no DOI, and you accessed it through a database or in print, just omit the DOI.

If an article has no DOI, and you accessed it through a website other than a database (for example, the journal’s own website), include a URL linking to the article.

Include the DOI at the very end of the APA reference entry . If you’re using the 6th edition APA guidelines, the DOI is preceded by the label “doi:”. In the 7th edition , the DOI is preceded by ‘https://doi.org/’.

  • 6th edition: doi: 10.1177/0894439316660340
  • 7th edition: https://doi.org/ 10.1177/0894439316660340

APA citation example (7th edition)

Hawi, N. S., & Samaha, M. (2016). The relations among social media addiction, self-esteem, and life satisfaction in university students. Social Science Computer Review , 35 (5), 576–586. https://doi.org/10.1177/0894439316660340

The abbreviation “ et al. ” (meaning “and others”) is used to shorten APA in-text citations with three or more authors . Here’s how it works:

Only include the first author’s last name, followed by “et al.”, a comma and the year of publication, for example (Taylor et al., 2018).

You may include up to 20 authors in a reference list entry .

When an article has more than 20 authors, replace the names prior to the final listed author with an ellipsis, but do not omit the final author:

Davis, Y., Smith, J., Caulfield, F., Pullman, H., Carlisle, J., Donahue, S. D., James, F., O’Donnell, K., Singh, J., Johnson, L., Streefkerk, R., McCombes, S., Corrieri, L., Valck, X., Baldwin, F. M., Lorde, J., Wardell, K., Lao, W., Yang, P., . . . O’Brien, T. (2012).

In an APA reference list , journal article citations include only the year of publication, not the exact date, month, or season.

The inclusion of volume and issue numbers makes a more specific date unnecessary.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2024, January 17). How to Cite a Journal Article in APA Style | Format & Example. Scribbr. Retrieved February 26, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/apa-examples/journal-article/

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Article Types: What's the Difference Between Newspapers, Magazines, and Journals?

  • Journal Articles
  • Definitions
  • Choosing What's Best

Journal Article Characteristics

  • Magazine Articles
  • Trade Magazine/Journal Articles
  • Newspaper Articles
  • Newsletter Articles

PMLA -- Publications of the Modern Language Association (an example of an academic journal)

Analyzing a Journal Article

Authors : Authors of journal articles are usually affiliated with universities, research institutions, or professional associations. Author degrees are usually specified with the author names, as are the affiliations.

Abstract : The article text is usually preceded with an abstract. The abstract will provide an overview of what the article discusses or reveals and frequently is useful in identifying articles that report the results of scientific studies. Use of Professional Terminology and Language: The language used in journal articles is specific to the subject matter being covered by the journal. For example, an article written for a psychological journal is written in an academic rather than popular style and will make heavy use of psychological terms.

In Text References : Journal articles normally will be profusely documented with sources that have provided information to the article authors and/or that provide further related information. Documentation of sources can be handled by in-text parenthetical references (MLA, APA, Chicago sciences styles), by the use of footnotes (Chicago humanities style), or by the use of endnotes (Turabian style). Individual journals will specify their own requirements for documentation.

Bibliography : Because journal articles use numerous sources as documentation, these sources are often referenced in an alphabetically or numerically arranged bibliography located at the end of the article. Format of the bibliography will vary depending on the documentation style used in the article.

Charts, Graphs, Tables, Statistical Data : Articles that result from research studies will often include statistical data gathered during the course of the studies. These data are often presented in charts and tables.

Length of Article : Journal articles, in general, tend to be fairly lengthy, often consisting of a dozen or more pages. Some journals also publish book reviews. These are typically brief and should not be confused with the full-length research articles that the journal focuses on.

Use of volume and issue numbering : Journals normally make use of volume and issue numbering to help identify individual issues in their series. Normally a volume will encompass an entire year's worth of a journal's issues. For example, a journal that is published four times yearly (quarterly) will have four issues in its yearly volume. Issues may be identified solely with numbers or with both numbers and date designations. For example, a quarterly journal will typically number its issues 1 through 4, but it might also assign season designations to the individual numbers, such as Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. A monthly journal will have twelve issues in a yearly volume and might use the month names along with the issue numbers (issue 1, January; issue 2, February; and so on). Some magazines, trade publications, and newspapers might also make use of volume and issue numbering, so this isn't always the best indicator.

Subject Focus : Journals typically gather and publish research that focuses on a very specific field of inquiry, like criminology, or southern history, or statistics.

Overall Appearance : Journals are typically heavy on text and light on illustration. Journal covers tend toward the plain with an emphasis on highlighting key research articles that appear within a particular issue.

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How to reference a Journal Article using the Chicago Manual of Style

The most basic entry for a journal article consists of the author name(s), article title, journal name, volume number, year published, and page numbers.

Last Name, First Name. “Article Title.” Journal Name Volume Number (Year Published): Page Numbers.

Smith, John. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12 (2009): 78-93.

The first author’s name should be reversed, with a comma being placed after the last name and a period after the first name (or any middle name). The name should not be abbreviated and should be written exactly as it appears in the newspaper. Titles and affiliations associated with the author should be omitted. A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr. should appear after the author’s given name, preceded by a comma.

For an article written by two or more authors, list them in order as they appear in the journal. Only the first author’s name should be reversed, while the others are written in normal order. Separate author names with a comma.

Smith, John, and Jane Doe. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12 (2009): 78-93.

The full article title, which is followed by a period, should be placed within quotation marks. Place the period within the quotation marks. Although Chicago traditionally uses the headline style of capitalizing the first letter of each word in the title, sentence style is also acceptable. Be consistent in your bibliography in using either style.

The article title is followed by the name of the journal, which is italicized. Omit any introductory articles (e.g. A, An, The) from the journal name. Journal names are usually given in full, since it is not incorrect to spell out a journal name. You can abbreviate a journal name if you wish, except if it consists of one word. It is common to abbreviate journal names from scientific works (e.g. Comp Tech Evol).

Include the volume number after the journal name. If an issue number is available, include it after the volume number and before the year published. Precede the issue number with a comma and the text “no.”.

Smith, John. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12, no. 3 (2009): 78-93.

Put the year of publication in parentheses. Afterwards, include a colon, the page numbers the article appears on, and a period. You may include the month or season in parentheses before the year, although it is not necessary if you include an issue number.

Smith, John. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12 (April 2009): 78-93.

If the article was published online, include the web address of the article, and then place the word “accessed”, along with the date on which you accessed the website (written in the format of “month day, year”) in parentheses. Conclude the citation with a period after the parentheses. For an article found in a database, cite it the same way you would an article published online: place the database URL in place of the website URL and cite the date on which you accessed the article.

Smith, John. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12 (2009): 78-93. http://www.weirdscience.org/articles/id=1212 (accessed February 21, 2009).

Smith, John. “Studies in pop rocks and Coke.” Weird Science 12 (2009): 78-93. http://www.lexisnexis.com (accessed February 21, 2009).

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willa cather chicago in text body reference citation

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Difference Between Article and Journal

An article is a written work published in a print or electronic medium. It may be for the general public or for a specific audience, such as academics or professionals. Articles can be published in various forms, such as news articles, feature articles, or opinion pieces.

A journal, on the other hand, is a periodical publication that contains a collection of articles, often written by researchers or experts in a particular field. Journals are typically more specialized and academic in nature, and they are often peer-reviewed, which means that the articles they contain have been reviewed and evaluated by other experts in the field before they are published.

Table of Contents

Comparison Chart

Here is a comparison table that summarizes the main differences between articles and journals:

What is Article?

An article is a written work that is published in a print or electronic medium. It may be for the general public or for a specific audience, such as academics or professionals. Articles can take various forms, such as news articles, feature articles, or opinion pieces. They may be published in newspapers, magazines, websites, or other types of publications. The purpose of an article is to communicate information, ideas, or opinions to the reader. Articles can be informative, persuasive, or both, and they often include supporting evidence, such as facts, statistics, and quotes.

What is Journal?

A journal is a periodical publication that contains a collection of articles, often written by researchers or experts in a particular field. Journals are typically more specialized and academic in nature than other types of publications. They may cover a wide range of topics within a specific subject area, or they may focus on a narrow field of study. Journals are often peer-reviewed, which means that the articles they contain have been reviewed and evaluated by other experts in the field before they are published. This helps to ensure the quality and reliability of the research presented in the journal. Journals are typically published on a regular basis, such as monthly or quarterly, and they may be available in print or electronic format.

Main Key Difference Between Article and Journal

Here are the main differences between articles and journals, summarized in bullet points: Article :

  • Short piece of writing on a specific topic
  • Can be found in magazines, newspapers, or academic journals
  • Often written by journalists, experts or freelance writers
  • Written in a more accessible, layman’s language
  • Purpose is to inform, entertain or educate the general public
  • Collection of articles, usually focused on a specific subject or field
  • Can be academic or professional in nature
  • Articles are usually peer-reviewed or edited by experts in the field
  • Written in a more technical, specialized language
  • Purpose is to share and advance knowledge among professionals or researchers in a particular field.

In conclusion, it is important to consider both the similarities and differences between articles and journals when deciding which type of publication is the most appropriate for your needs. While articles can provide a wide range of information and perspectives on a variety of topics, journals are typically more specialized and academic in nature, and they often present research findings that have been rigorously reviewed and evaluated by experts in the field. Ultimately, the choice between an article and a journal will depend on your specific goals and needs as a writer or researcher.

Sajius Islam

Sajius Islam is a creative writer who enjoys Blog & Content Writing. He received his Bachelor of Science (B.Sc) degree from Guwahati University, Guwahati. He loves spending time with her family and friends, traveling, and exploring new cultures.

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Difference Between a Journal and an Article

• Categorized under Career & Education | Difference Between a Journal and an Article

Journal vs Article

Ancient man told his stories through painting and by orally passing them down to his descendants. When he started to interact with people from other places and to trade with them, he turned to writing. It provided him with a more reliable means of keeping records and transmitting information.

It was originally meant to record historical events and to maintain financial records. Today, there are many forms of writing. Writing is used as entertainment (novels and fairy tales), in education (encyclopedias and textbooks), and it is also used to record events and state facts about people, places, and other topics (articles and journals).

An article is defined as a nonfictional literary composition which is published in print or electronic medium. It has three types, namely; text (news, academic paper, blog, marketing, Usenet), spoken (audio recordings or podcasts), and listicles (contain lists).

It is composed of:

  • Headline, which specifies what the article is about and is located at the top of each article.
  • Byline, which states the name and title of the writer.
  • Lead, which guides the reader and is intended to catch their attention.
  • Body, which provides details about the subject of the article which may be a list, a narrative, an interview, or any other form.
  • Conclusion, which may be a quote, a summary, a descriptive scene, or a play on the lead.

The word “article” comes from the Latin word “articulus” which means “small joint” and the Old French word “article” which means “separate parts of anything written.” Its first use to mean literary composition was in 1712.

The word “journal,” on the other hand, comes from the Latin word “diurnalis” which means “daily.” It reached the English language through the Anglo-French word “jurnal” which means “a day.” Its first recorded use to describe a daily record of transactions was in the mid-16th century.

Today, a journal is used to refer to a daily record of business or events such as accounting journals and diaries. It may also mean periodicals such as newspapers and other publications such as magazines and scholarly journals.

Scholarly journals are also called open access journals that are available on the Internet and are financed by the government or an academic institution. Business and accounting journals are used in bookkeeping and to record the transactions of a business.

1. An article is a published nonfictional literary work while a journal refers to a daily record of events or business as well as to periodicals like newspapers and magazines. 2. Journals are usually kept personally by its author (diaries) or owners (accounting journals); they can be viewed or read for a fee (magazines) or for free at websites or libraries while articles are usually written for publication wherein the writer is paid for his article. 3. An article may be composed as text, in audio form, or as listings while a journal cannot be made in audio form. 4. The word “article” comes from the Latin word “articulus” while the word “journal” comes from the Latin word “diurnalis.”

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Cite APA 7 M, E. (2011, August 26). Difference Between a Journal and an Article. Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects. http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/career-education/difference-between-a-journal-and-an-article/. MLA 8 M, Emelda. "Difference Between a Journal and an Article." Difference Between Similar Terms and Objects, 26 August, 2011, http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/career-education/difference-between-a-journal-and-an-article/.

sure indeed as say prof dr mircea orasanu

then sure must consider importance of thes questions as say prof dr mircea orasanu and importance of the articles

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Written by : Emelda M. and updated on 2011, August 26 Articles on DifferenceBetween.net are general information, and are not intended to substitute for professional advice. The information is "AS IS", "WITH ALL FAULTS". User assumes all risk of use, damage, or injury. You agree that we have no liability for any damages.

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Citation Style Guide : Telling Citations Apart

Telling citations apart.

  • Citation Builders and Managers
  • Google Docs Citation Builder
  • AI and Citations

OK, let's say you have a citation and you need to find its source. Can you tell just by looking at the citation is it's a book, journal, or something else? Of course you can!

There are different citation rules for around 59 different types of resources. There are different rules for books, journals, websites, music, oral interviews, and even comics. However, most citations you will deal with will fall into one of three categories: books, journals, or websites.   

Book citations always include a publisher and, in most cases, a publisher location. For example:

Example Book Citations

  Why This Is Important?

Why is it important to know if you have a citation for a book? The citation tells you where to look. If you know you are looking for a book, you will know to start your search with the Library Catalog  since that's the best place to find books in the Library.   

Journal citations usually include article title, journal title, date, pages, volume, and issue number (Note: not all journals have volume and issue numbers). Journals never include publisher information or publisher location. Behold:

Example Journal Citations

Why is it important to know if you have a citation for a journal? The citation tells you where to look. If you know you are looking for a journal, you will know to start your search with the Journal Search since that's the best place to find journals and newspapers in the Library. 

  Websites

Websites are usually the easiest citations to tell because in many cases the citation includes the URL of the website. As more and more books and journals move to online formats, you do need to be careful and make sure that the URL is not from a library database. You can usually tell if it's from your library because it will have your library's name somewhere ( https://ezproxy.library. astate .edu). Here's some examples of websites:

Example Website Citations

   Why This Is Important?

Why is it important to know if you have a citation for a website? The citation tells you where to look. If you know you are looking for a website, you will know that you won't need to use the Library resources, you can just go straight to the website from your browser.

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Periodicals

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Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

This section contains information on The Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style , which was issued in 2017.

Periodicals include print journals, electronic journals, magazines, and newspapers. Citations for these sources should include enough information for the reader to find them   in a library or a database, and as such, publication dates are essential. Magazines and newspapers are typically serialized by day, month, and year; journals include volume, year, month, or season and issue number.

One of the major differences between notes and bibliographic entries for periodicals is the way in which major elements are separated. In notes, the major elements are separated by commas. In the bibliography, the major elements are separated by periods.

Notes and bibliographic entries for a journal include the following: full name of the author(s), article title, journal title, and issue information. Issue information refers to volume, issue number, month, year, and page number(s). For online works, retrieval information and the date of access are also included. Author Name:

Notes include the author’s name as listed in the article. Bibliographic entries, however, invert the author’s name (last name, first name). Article Title: Both notes and bibliographies use quotation marks to set off the titles of articles within the journal. Journal Title: Journal titles may omit an initial “The” but should otherwise be given in full, capitalized (headline-style), and italicized. Issue Information: The volume number follows the journal title with no punctuation and is not italicized. The issue number (if it is given) is separated from the volume number with a comma and is preceded by “no.” The year appears in parentheses after the volume number (or issue number if given). The year may be preceded by a specific date, month, or season if given. Page information follows the year. For notes, page number(s) refer only to the cited material; the bibliography includes the first and last pages of the article.

Electronic Journals

Citing electronic journals generally follows the same format for printed periodicals, which is explained in the Journals section. Additionally, entries include the DOI or URL (DOIs are preferred). The date accessed is not required by CMOS for citations of formally published electronic sources. If an access date is required for other reasons (i.e. by discipline, publisher, or instructor), the access date should be included immediately prior to the DOI or URL. If included, access dates should be separated by commas in notes or periods in bibliographical entries.

Even if weekly or monthly magazines are numbered by volume or issue, they are cited by date only. When following the CMOS Note and Bibliography style, the year is presented as shown in the examples below. When following the CMOS Author-Date style, the date is essential to the citation and it is not enclosed in parentheses.

Page Numbers: Citations for journal articles may include a specific page number. Inclusive page numbers for the entire article are often omitted in bibliographical entries, however, because the pages of the article are often separated by many pages of unrelated material. If page numbers are included, they should follow the date and be preceded by a colon.

Notes and bibliographic entries for magazines include the following information: author’s name, article title (enclosed by quotation marks), magazine title (italicized), and date. Page numbers are included in notes but are omitted in bibliographic entries. Regular departments (or regularly occurring subsections) in a magazine are capitalized but not put in quotation marks. For example, National Geographic is the magazine that regularly includes a department called Foods of the Region.  

Online Magazines

Notes and bibliographic entries for online magazines should follow the relevant examples for printed magazines. Additionally, online magazine entries should contain the URL at the end of the citation. If no stable URL exists, the name of the database can be substituted. Note:  In the examples below, Green Room is not placed in quotation marks because it is the department title rather than the article title. Access Date:

Access dates are not required by CMOS in citations of formally published electronic sources. If an access date is required for other reasons (i.e. by discipline, publisher, or instructor), the access date should be included immediately prior to the URL. In notes, access dates are surrounded by commas and in bibliographic entries they are surrounded by periods.

Notes and bibliographic entries for newspapers should include the following: name of the author (if listed), headline or column heading, newspaper name, month (often abbreviated), day, and year. Since issues may include several editions, page numbers are usually omitted. If an online edition of a newspaper is consulted, the URL should be added at the end of the citation. Time stamps may be appropriate to include when stories for unfolding events are modified. Names of Newspapers: If the name of a newspaper begins with “The,” this word is omitted. For American newspapers that are not well-known, a city name should be added along with the newspaper title (see below). Additionally, a state abbreviation may be added in parentheses after the city name. News Services: News services, such as the Associated Press or the United Press International, are capitalized but not italicized and often appear in the author position of the citation. Headlines: Headlines may be capitalized using “headline style,” in which all major words are capitalized. Although many major newspapers prefer sentence style, the CMOS recommends headline style for consistency among various types of cited sources. Headlines presented entirely in full capital letters in the original are usually converted to headline-style upper and lower case in the citation. Regular Columns: If a regular column is cited, the column name may be included with the article title.

Editorials, Letters to the Editor, and Readers’ Comments: Published editorials and letters to the editor should be treated generically, usually without headlines. Instead of a title, use “letter to the editor” [14.196]. Citing in Text: Newspapers are more often cited in notes or parenthetical references than in bibliographies. If newspaper sources are carefully documented in the text, they need not be cited in the bibliography.

Crafting an Appropriate Running Title for Your Scientific Paper

  • Research Process
  • Peer Review

What should your approach be to crafting a running title? Should it be catchy? Abbreviated? What do editors look for?

Updated on June 10, 2014

aje editing tips

Many journals require that a running title, also known as a running head or short title, be included in submitted manuscripts. This shortened form of the main title, usually cited at the top of each published page of an article, serves to guide readers browsing a print journal, shuffling loose printed pages, or toggling between multiple papers in PDF form. The running head may also be used in RSS feeds and mobile applications instead of the frequently more unwieldy main title.

Requirements for running titles vary between journals, but generally, they must be 50-60 characters long at most, often including spaces. To achieve brevity, these titles typically include abbreviations, even if the main title does not (or cannot , based on journal guidelines). Articles (the, a, an) may also be omitted to conserve characters, and wordy phrasing , including filler phrases , should be minimized. However, if the main title is brief enough, it can function as the running head as well.

Unlike for the manuscript title itself, being catchy is not a priority for a running title. Rather, because it is so abbreviated, clarity and accuracy should be priorities. Some also suggest that as much content as possible should be preserved from the main title, although in practice, this approach is not widespread; authors instead tend to include only what they deem most important to highlight.

The following is an example of effective title abridgment, drawn from a recently published article (Lambert et al., 2013; CC-BY license ):

  • Manuscript title: Dendritic Cell Immunoreceptor Is a New Target for Anti-AIDS Drug Development: Identification of DCIR/HIV-1 Inhibitors (117 ch with spaces, 103 ch without spaces)
  • Running title: Inhibitors of DCIR Limit HIV-1 Infection (40 characters with spaces, 35 characters without spaces)

The authors combined a few strategies here to reduce the title length by two thirds, applying the abbreviation “DCIR,” omitting articles (“DCIR” instead of “the DCIR”), and focusing on what they judged to be the central concept (the limitation of HIV-1 infection by the inhibitors, rather than the novelty of the target, the application in drug development, or the identification process). Of course, this task may be easier for papers with a narrower and more descriptive focus, such as review articles.

We hope that this editing tip has clarified what a running title is and how to approach writing one. Please email us with any questions or comments. We wish you the best in your manuscript writing!

Michaela Panter, Writing Support Consultant at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, PhD, Immunobiology, Yale University

Michaela Panter, PhD

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Writing titles and abstracts

The importance of writing a good title and abstract.

The title and abstract are the most visible parts of your article.

During peer review, the title and abstract are used when we invite reviewers. Invited reviewers are asked to decide whether they wish to review the manuscript on the basis of the title and abstract alone.

If and when the manuscript is published, more people will read the title and abstract than the whole article. In fact, many people will only read the title and abstract, and may only try to read them once. It is thus important to catch the reader's attention by making the title and abstract as concise, accurate and readable as possible.

Most people rely on electronic search engines to find articles. Usually they search through databases that contain only the title, author list and abstract of articles, excluding any keywords attached to the article by its authors. This is the case, for example, for the National Library of Medicine's databases, including Medline and PubMed. It is therefore important to include in the title and/or abstract the words that potential readers of the article are likely to use during a search.

If you want to make sure that your article is found as a "Related Article" in PubMed searches, please bear in mind that the algorithm used for this functionality gives more weight to less common terms, words used more frequently within a document, and terms in the title.

Titles: The key to ensuring your article will be found

The title is an essential way to bring the article to potential readers' attention, especially in those cases where the database being searched does not include the abstract of the article. The title must therefore be as accurate, informative and complete as possible.

Some tips on titles

  • Be as descriptive as possible and use specific rather than general terms: for instance, include the specific drug name rather than just the class of drug.
  • Use simple word order and common word combinations: e.g. "juvenile delinquency" is more commonly used than "delinquency amongst juveniles".
  • Avoid using abbreviations; they could have different meanings in different fields.
  • Avoid using acronyms and initialisms: e.g. "Ca" for calcium could be mistaken for "CA", which means cancer.
  • Write scientific names in full, e.g. Escherichia coli rather than E. coli.
  • Refer to chemicals by their common or generic name instead of their formulas.
  • Avoid the use of Roman numerals in the title as they can be interpreted differently: for instance, part III could be mistaken for factor III.

Abstracts: Selecting the most important information

The abstract must outline the most important aspects of the study while providing only a limited amount of detail on its background, methodology and results. Authors need to critically assess the different aspects of the manuscript and choose those that are sufficiently important to deserve inclusion in the abstract.

Once the abstract is ready it can be helpful to ask a colleague who is not involved in the research to go through it to ensure that the descriptions are clear. After the manuscript is written, the authors should go back to the abstract to check that it agrees with the contents of the final manuscript.

Abstract structure

Abstracts should have a structured format. This serves several purposes: it helps authors summarize the different aspects of their work; it makes the abstract more immediately clear; and it helps peer reviewers and readers assess the contents of the manuscript.

The abstract structure varies between journals and between types of article. Authors should check that the abstract of their manuscript is consistent with the requirements of the article type and journal to which the manuscript will be submitted. Please note that the abstract requirements differ between the biology and medical journals in the BMC series published by BMC, for example.

The abstracts of manuscripts submitted to the biology journals in the BMC series should be structured as follows:

Background: This should place the study into the context of the current knowledge in its field and list the purpose of the work; in other words, the authors should summarize why they carried out their research. Results: This section should describe the main findings of the study. Conclusions: A brief summary of the content of the manuscript and the potential implications of its results. The abstracts of manuscripts submitted to the medical journals in the BMC series should be structured as follows: Background, Methods , Results, and Conclusions. The Background, Results, and Conclusions are as for the biology journals, above. In addition, the Methods section should summarize how the study was performed and mention the different techniques employed. It should also include details of any statistical tests employed.

For further details on the requirements of any particular journal published by BMC, please check the relevant 'Instructions for Authors' page.

Some tips on writing abstracts

  • Check the abstract length: Abstracts should not exceed 350 words. Abstracts that are too long lose their function as summaries of the full article, and excess words may be omitted by some indexing services.
  • Include synonyms for words and concepts that are in the title: e.g. if referring to 'stillbirths' in the title mention 'perinatal deaths' in the abstract (if appropriate).
  • As in the title, use simple word order and common word combinations.
  • Make sure the salient points of the manuscript are included, but be consistent; the abstract should only reflect those points covered in the manuscript.
  • Minimize the use of abbreviations.
  • Avoid citing references.

Rigorous Themes

  • Internet , Website Tools & Tips

Website Title vs Article Title – What’s The Difference?

If your website isn’t optimized for the web, there’s a high chance it won’t be successful. Correct web optimization allows search engines to crawl your site and understand it so as to drive traffic to it. On top of that, it boosts your brand’s visibility and business growth.

After all, the right people need to see and navigate your website so you can generate the right results that you want for your business.

One of the key search engine optimization (SEO) aspects is the website and article titles. These are the first things people will see as they search for specific keywords and view the search results or when they click on your link and visit your webpage.

In brief, a website title signifies search engines what your website is about. Whereas an article title indicates what kind of content a web page has. It could simply be the name, or the headline of the article.

What Is A Website Title?

Why you need a website title, keep your website title within 50-60 characters to avoid title truncation, use sentence or title case, place keywords naturally, use unique page titles, use separate titles, what is an article title, why you need an article title, how to properly word and optimize an article title, how to set a website title on wordpress, how to set an article title on wordpress, wrapping up.

If your website title or article title isn’t correctly optimized, users can opt to click away instead of clicking through your site.

In this guide today, I will explain what each of these represents and how you can optimize them on your site.

Let’s get started.

A website title, also known as the title tag, appears in several places across the web. The title helps users and search engines identify your web page and what it’s about.

In code, the website title is displayed on top of a XHTML or HTML document within the head tag as follows:

<head>

<title> your website title </title>

</head>

what is the difference between article and journal title

On a web browser, the website title is displayed at the top of the window or tab while in search results, the website title appears as bold hyperlinked texts. Ideally, you need to ensure that your website title is clear, 50 to 65 characters long, and is descriptive without being truncated.

The website title provides users with a brief but comprehensive description of the content of your web page. This way, search engine algorithms can determine whether your website is relevant enough to the inputted keyword or search term.

Check Out : Best Link Building Outreach Tools

what is the difference between article and journal title

The website title acts as an entry point for users to your website while serving as your brand or business online storefront. Visitors can get more information as to what your page and website are about.

If you don’t optimize or word your website title correctly, users may not click through to your site. On the other hand, a properly worded and optimized website title can bring copious amounts of visitors to your site, which is why your overall SEO optimization strategy must include experimentation and optimization of your website titles.

Strong website titles also encourage and attract clicks especially if your web page isn’t ranking in the top five results on page one of search engine results pages (SERPs).

Adding a target search term or keyword in your website title also allows search engine bots to know that the content is relevant. This way, they can pair the information with what the visitor is looking for.

Once users are familiar with your brand, you can always include your brand name in the website title to encourage more clicks based on the name.

For example, you can have a website title like, Website Title Vs Article Title: What’s The Difference – Rigorous Themes . Here, the brand name Rigorous Themes is included to ensure that the users who are already familiar with the brand can click through to learn more about the keyword.

Also Read : SEMrush Review

How To Properly Word And Optimize A Website Title?

As we’ve already seen, you need to optimize and word your website title correctly to avoid common mistakes that may cost you website traffic and business growth. Here are some best practices you can follow to ensure that your website title is presented in the best possible way:

Title truncation happens when the title is too long to fit into search engines’ pixel width. If it’s too long, visitors may not be willing to click through because the title looks unfinished and uninformative. Plus, it can affect your site’s rankings if the search engine bots can’t crawl the entire title. Keep it precise and concise enough for your visitors to get the information they need.

Website titles need to look professional, not spammy. If your brand name is in all caps, you can keep it at the end of the website title, but make sure the main title is in sentence or title case for better formatting.

Keywords should appear in your website title naturally, and not be stuffed such that irrelevant keywords are placed all over the website title to manipulate page rank. Optimize your website titles for a particular selected keyword, not many.

Give each of your pages unique titles just as your page on a website should be unique. Each page’s website title needs to be optimized such that it will reflect the content on the page. This way, search engine bots and users can understand the information in your content and what your page is about.

It’s possible to duplicate your page titles, but this only affects your search engine rankings because the search engine bots aren’t able to differentiate the difference between the pages. When this happens, the bots will consider and rank the pages as the same.

The risk of duplication is higher for eCommerce store owners especially if they sell similar products in shape, identity, or size. Create titles that reflect your page content accurately, whether or not the difference between the pages is minor. You can have different creative angles through which you can present the content or focus on a particular aspect per page.

what is the difference between article and journal title

An article title appears above the content on the web page to show what the content is about. It’s the large heading displayed above the article content and forms the basis for the page name and URL.

The title may be something as simple as a name or the subject of your article. However, if the article topic doesn’t have a name, it may be a description of the topic.

It’s not possible for two articles to share a title, so it’s necessary to add information that distinguishes them from each other often in the form of a description after the name.

Generally, an article title takes the <h1></h1> format and helps identify the subject precisely.

what is the difference between article and journal title

An article title, commonly referred to as an H1 header tag is significant for several reasons.

To begin with, the article title is essential for your website visitors and for search engines as it determines the kind of impression both will have with your content.

From the user side, the article title represents their first experience with your content, while helping search engines understand what it’s about.

As the headline of your page or article, this title gets more attention from Google because it’s the largest thing the website visitors can see on the page.

Just like writing a website, there are certain common best practices you need to follow in order to write a suitable and optimized article title, including:

  • Creating a catchy article title that will draw the user’s attention
  • Using the article title only once on the page
  • Using the recommended number of characters (usually 50)
  • Avoiding over spamming with queries
  • Intersecting exclusively with what is discussed in the text (body) of the article
  • Using a frequent question that didn’t fit in the title

Your article and website titles don’t have to match though they often intersect in meaning and tend to have similar queries.

If you use them properly, the website and article titles can help you rank better in search engines. On the other hand, if misused, they can affect your position in search engines negatively, sometimes leading to penalties so be sure to use them appropriately.

Difference Between A Website Title And An Article Title

A website title and article title may look similar but there are some distinct differences that can help you tell one from the other. Both titles serve to describe to your site’s visitors what your webpage and website are about and they can be leveraged for SEO.

To be sure you know which is which, here are the subtle differences between a website title and article title.

A website title acts as a meta tag and is found at the head of the page but it doesn’t form part of the actual content. You won’t see the website title on the page but at the top of the screen of your web browser.

An article title, on the other hand, is visible on your web page and is the most prominent text.

A website title is designed to let Google and search engine bots know what your page is about and is displayed in the SERPs as people searching for specific keywords click on to visit your page. When someone bookmarks your web page, the website title provides a default bookmark title.

The website title also contains keywords that help promote a specific page and boost its ranking in the SERPs.

An article title, on the other hand, helps your site’s visitors know what to expect on that page.

How To Set A Website Title And Article Title On WordPress?

If you run a site that’s powered by WordPress, you can easily set the website and article titles using a few simple steps. Here’s how.

Once you’ve installed WordPress, you can change your website title and its tagline too so as to welcome the users to your site while letting them know the purpose of your site. The website title and tagline also help promote a good user experience and encourage engagement.

To set a website title on your site in WordPress, you’ll use the Theme Customizer in the WordPress dashboard by following these steps:

  • Sign in to your WordPress dashboard .

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • Navigate to Appearance > Customize or select Customize in the left pane.

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • In the Customizer, click Site Identity .

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • Next, select Site Title and Tagline .

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • Once you’re done, hit the Publish button to save your changes.

what is the difference between article and journal title

Note : In the Site Identity options, you can set the website title and tagline, set a site favicon or icon, and upload a logo too. If you just want to show a logo, you can disable the website title and tagline.

To set an article title on WordPress, use the steps below:

  • Open a new post by selecting Posts on the left pane and then select Add New .

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • In the new post screen, you’ll see a section at the top labeled Add Title (depending on your theme).

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • Type in your article title and select Save Draft so you can save your changes as you work on the rest of the content.

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • Once your article is ready to go, select Preview to see how the article will look like when published.

what is the difference between article and journal title

  • If everything looks good, hit Publish and your article will be live on the site.

what is the difference between article and journal title

Web optimization is a key part of any business or brand as it boosts visibility and business growth in general.

A website title and article title may look like a minute part of the overall strategy. However, they help search engine bots understand your pages, serve them to the right users, and make it easier for them to navigate and find whatever they’re looking for.

Creating useful titles for all your website pages doesn’t require writing much, but you shouldn’t assume they’re the same, and that they’re something you should treat as easy and quick. Ignoring their role in SEO and optimizing them for the web can cost you dearly.

Take some time to create the best website title and article titles as they’ll signal to search engines what your page is about and communicate better to users. Ultimately, if you get these two components right, they can improve your site’s rankings and increase your click-through rates.

what is the difference between article and journal title

Tom loves to write on technology, e-commerce & internet marketing. I started my first e-commerce company in college, designing and selling t-shirts for my campus bar crawl using print-on-demand. Having successfully established multiple 6 & 7-figure e-commerce businesses (in women’s fashion and hiking gear), I think I can share a tip or 2 to help you succeed.

Title: Impact of digital financial infrastructure in furthering financial inclusion in India

Authors : Arindam Metia

Addresses : Raiganj University, Raiganj, Uttar Dinajpur, 733134, West Bengal, India

Abstract : Information technology and digital infrastructure have ushered in India's fourth industrial revolution. One of the most important aspects of providing digital services is digital identity, which has become possible after the implementation of biometric identification (Aadhaar). The goal of this study is to highlight the current state of the banking and mobile money industries. This article highlights India's success in digital adoption as well as points out areas that need to be improved to realise the goals of financial inclusion. The study also compares the current state of India/s financial inclusion to that of other SAARC and high-income nations. Financial inclusion is being hampered by a number of factors, including digital fraud and the difference in digital services between rural and urban areas, the report said. Financial integration, as well as strong digital security and financial literacy programs, can improve India/s financial stability and long-term prosperity.

Keywords : inclusion; digital finance; India; subscribers; financial access.

DOI : 10.1504/IJICBM.2024.136804

International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management, 2024 Vol.31 No.2, pp.160 - 183

Received: 07 May 2022 Accepted: 22 Jul 2022 Published online: 22 Feb 2024 *

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IMAGES

  1. What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

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  2. What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

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  3. Citation Styles

    what is the difference between article and journal title

  4. My students seem increasingly confused by the difference between

    what is the difference between article and journal title

  5. What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

    what is the difference between article and journal title

  6. Difference Between Journal Article and Research Paper

    what is the difference between article and journal title

VIDEO

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  4. Cute Journal title ideas 💖 #shorts #tiktok #journal

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  6. journal title {black morning} part 1

COMMENTS

  1. Difference Between Article and Journal (with Comparison Chart)

    While the article is a work of literature, the journal is a form of publication. An article is non-fictional and informative in nature. As against, the journal is educational and academic. The article can include news, stories, information, facts or writer's experience, opinion, suggestion, facts, etc. Conversely, a journal contains articles ...

  2. What is the difference between an article and a journal?

    Dec 07, 2023 990. An article is a nonfiction writing that forms an independent part of a publication like a journal. A journal is a collection of articles and is published periodically throughout the year. Examples would be the Journal of the American Medical Association or American Journal of Public Health. You would find articles in a journal.

  3. Article vs Journal: Usage Guidelines and Popular Confusions

    On the other hand, a journal article is a piece of writing that is published in an academic journal. It is typically longer than an article, and it is written for a specialized audience of experts in a particular field. With these definitions in mind, it is clear that there are important differences between articles and journal articles.

  4. What's the difference in the "journal article title" and "journal title

    Answered By: Rachel WhittinghamJan 09, 2019 4141. A "journal article title" is what each article, within a journal, has been titled by its author. Journals are similar to magazines, except that they contain academic, scholarly content that generally has been reviewed by experts in the content field around which the journal focuses, i.e. "peer ...

  5. What's the difference between an article, a journal, and a database

    Each database includes sources such as articles, government documents, and many more. You can search for databases by name using the "Databases" search on the libraries' home page. One of the most common types of sources is a journal. This word may be used interchangeably in some places with periodical or serial, but basically a journal ...

  6. What is the Difference Between Article and Journal

    The main difference between article and journal is that an article is much shorter than a journal.. When you are writing an academic paper or conducting a research study, you will need to consult various articles and journals. An article is a written composition in prose, usually nonfiction, on a specific topic, forming an independent part of a publication.

  7. My students seem increasingly confused by the difference between

    Some students repeated the same text for #2 and #3, suggesting they don't understand the difference between a journal title and an article title. In the slot where I asked for the title of the journal, one student seems to have entered the keywords she searched for. I've started saying that the journal title is like the name of a TV series.

  8. What is a journal article? (What is an article?)

    Journal articles are shorter than books and written about very specific topics. A journal is a collection of articles (like a magazine) that is published regularly throughout the year. Journals present the most recent research, and journal articles are written by experts, for experts. They may be published in print or online formats, or both.

  9. Types of journal articles

    This is the most common type of journal manuscript used to publish full reports of data from research. It may be called an Original Article, Research Article, Research, or just Article, depending on the journal. The Original Research format is suitable for many different fields and different types of studies.

  10. Titles in research articles

    Abstract. Titles are a key part of every academic genre and are particularly important in research papers. Today, online searches are overwhelmingly based on articles rather than journals which means that writers must, more than ever, make their titles both informative and appealing to attract readers who may go on to read, cite and make use of ...

  11. 14 Difference between Article and Journal (With Table)

    An Article is a written piece of content that focus on a specific topic or subject matter while a journal is a publication comprising of multiple articles or research papers within a specific discipline. Articles and journals are popular among individuals conducting research study or writing academic papers. The styles of writing between these ...

  12. How to Cite a Journal Article in APA Style

    If you want to cite a special issue of a journal rather than a regular article, the name (s) of the editor (s) and the title of the issue appear in place of the author's name and article title: APA format. Last name, Initials. (Ed. or Eds.). ( Year ). Title of issue [Special issue]. Journal Name, Volume ( Issue ).

  13. Definitions

    Journal articles are typically of substantial length (often more than 10 pages) and usually reflect research, whether it be surveys of existing research or discussions of original research. Most journal articles will be prefaced with an abstract and will include extensive documentation within the article or at the end of the article.

  14. Journal Articles

    Authors: Authors of journal articles are usually affiliated with universities, research institutions, or professional associations.Author degrees are usually specified with the author names, as are the affiliations. Abstract: The article text is usually preceded with an abstract.The abstract will provide an overview of what the article discusses or reveals and frequently is useful in ...

  15. Citing a Journal Article

    The article title is followed by the name of the journal, which is italicized. Omit any introductory articles (e.g. A, An, The) from the journal name. Journal names are usually given in full, since it is not incorrect to spell out a journal name. You can abbreviate a journal name if you wish, except if it consists of one word.

  16. Difference Between Article and Journal with Comparison Chart

    Written in a more accessible, layman's language. Purpose is to inform, entertain or educate the general public. Journal: Collection of articles, usually focused on a specific subject or field. Can be academic or professional in nature. Articles are usually peer-reviewed or edited by experts in the field. Written in a more technical ...

  17. Difference Between a Journal and an Article

    3. An article may be composed as text, in audio form, or as listings while a journal cannot be made in audio form. 4. The word "article" comes from the Latin word "articulus" while the word "journal" comes from the Latin word "diurnalis.". Author.

  18. LibGuides: Citation Style Guide : Telling Citations Apart

    Journal citations usually include article title, journal title, date, pages, volume, and issue number (Note: not all journals have volume and issue numbers). Journals never include publisher information or publisher location.

  19. Periodicals

    One of the major differences between notes and bibliographic entries for periodicals is the way in which major elements are separated. ... Notes and bibliographic entries for a journal include the following: full name of the author(s), article title, journal title, and issue information. Issue information refers to volume, issue number, month ...

  20. PDF APA Style Reference Guide for Journal Articles, Books, and Edited Book

    Provide the title of the book in which the chapter appears. Capitalize only the first letter of the first word. For a two-part title, capitalize the first word of the second part of the title. Also capitalize proper nouns. Italicize the book title. Include the chapter page range. End with a period.

  21. Crafting an Appropriate Running Title for Your Scientific Paper

    Requirements for running titles vary between journals, but generally, they must be 50-60 characters long at most, often including spaces. To achieve brevity, these titles typically include abbreviations, even if the main title does not (or cannot, based on journal guidelines). Articles (the, a, an) may also be omitted to conserve characters ...

  22. Writing titles and abstracts

    The importance of writing a good title and abstract. The title and abstract are the most visible parts of your article. During peer review, the title and abstract are used when we invite reviewers. Invited reviewers are asked to decide whether they wish to review the manuscript on the basis of the title and abstract alone.

  23. Website Title vs Article Title

    Difference Between A Website Title And An Article Title. A website title and article title may look similar but there are some distinct differences that can help you tell one from the other. Both titles serve to describe to your site's visitors what your webpage and website are about and they can be leveraged for SEO.

  24. Article: Impact of digital financial infrastructure in furthering

    International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management; 2024 Vol.31 No.2; Title: Impact of digital financial infrastructure in furthering financial inclusion in India Authors: Arindam Metia. Addresses: Raiganj University, Raiganj, Uttar Dinajpur, 733134, West Bengal, India. Abstract: Information technology and digital infrastructure have ushered in India's fourth industrial revolution.